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juge d'instruction

English translation: examining/investigating magistrate

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:juge d'instruction
English translation:examining/investigating magistrate
Entered by: Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:48 May 18, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / foreign request for assistance
French term or phrase: juge d'instruction
Foreign requests for judicial assistance may be made by a foreign court or tribunal, including an investigating magistrate or juge d'instruction.
anglista
Local time: 19:50
Question
Explanation:
"investigating magistrate" is one of the most common ways of translating "juge d'instruction".

Is your original text in English or in French?





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 12:41:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"examining magistrate\" is another common translation of this term.

What has to be borne in mind though is that neither magistrates nor judges play any investigative role in the UK. Note also that the term \"magistrate\" has a particular meaning in England and Wales - but that\'s a diffierent story!

http://switzerland.isyours.com/e/banking/secrecy/anti.money....

Swiss examining magistrate has the right to conduct a search of a bank within the context of a criminal case. The search must be justified by accurate and objectively founded evidence (i.e. there has to be proof) and it must be conducted with precision.


http://www.switzerland.isyours.com/f/banque/secret/instructi...

Un juge d\'instruction suisse a le droit d\'effectuer une perquisition dans une banque dans le cadre d\'une affaire pénale. Une telle perquisition doit être justifiée par des soupçons précis et objectivement fondée (c\'est à dire qu\'il doit y avoir des preuves), et elle doit être circonscrite avec précision.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 19:51:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for indicating the original language. As the original is in American English, then I think there is a simple explanation.

Where the original states :

\"... including an investigating magistrate or juge d\'instruction\"

then it is simply referring to the French system, the French having been left in to indicate to the reader what the French term for \"investigating magistrate\" is. This is one way round avoiding notes when translating a text in some instances.

Your obvious solution here when translating into French is to leave out \"investigating magistrate\" and just leave \"juge d\'instruction.\" It\'s surprising that your original did not have the term \"juge d\'instruction\" in inverted commas...

By the way, this ought to have been posted in the English>French section so I am going to move it over to the \"other side\".

Nikki Scott-Despaigne

Moderator FR>EN


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 19:56:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Actually, no, I shall leave this one in the FR>EN section after all as anyone checking the glossary for \"juge d\'instruction\" would find your question useful.
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 19:50
Grading comment
Actually, I'm translating the text from AmEnglish into Polish, I asked the question to make sure I understand the meaning of the French term inserted. Thank you very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3examining magistrate/judge
Parrot
4 +2Question
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 +2Investigating magistrate
Mabel Garzón
5investigating magistrateBrig


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
examining magistrate/judge


Explanation:
The "instruction" is the investigative stage of a case.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GILOU: oui je viens de changer, vous aviez répondu déjà)
2 mins

agree  Lise Boismenu, B.Sc.: Tout à fait!
2 mins

agree  irat56
4 mins

neutral  5Q: The word 'examining' could lead to confusion, see comment below, under Mabel's suggestion.
53 mins
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Investigating magistrate


Explanation:
Exp.

Mabel Garzón
Colombia
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  5Q: I prefer this one, because examining of the case also takes place in the court room. These judges - e.g. Halphen, Garzon (the Pinochet case) actually investigate and establish a case before it gets to court. Their role is like a detective.
20 mins

agree  DPolice
1 hr
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Question


Explanation:
"investigating magistrate" is one of the most common ways of translating "juge d'instruction".

Is your original text in English or in French?





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 12:41:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"examining magistrate\" is another common translation of this term.

What has to be borne in mind though is that neither magistrates nor judges play any investigative role in the UK. Note also that the term \"magistrate\" has a particular meaning in England and Wales - but that\'s a diffierent story!

http://switzerland.isyours.com/e/banking/secrecy/anti.money....

Swiss examining magistrate has the right to conduct a search of a bank within the context of a criminal case. The search must be justified by accurate and objectively founded evidence (i.e. there has to be proof) and it must be conducted with precision.


http://www.switzerland.isyours.com/f/banque/secret/instructi...

Un juge d\'instruction suisse a le droit d\'effectuer une perquisition dans une banque dans le cadre d\'une affaire pénale. Une telle perquisition doit être justifiée par des soupçons précis et objectivement fondée (c\'est à dire qu\'il doit y avoir des preuves), et elle doit être circonscrite avec précision.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 19:51:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for indicating the original language. As the original is in American English, then I think there is a simple explanation.

Where the original states :

\"... including an investigating magistrate or juge d\'instruction\"

then it is simply referring to the French system, the French having been left in to indicate to the reader what the French term for \"investigating magistrate\" is. This is one way round avoiding notes when translating a text in some instances.

Your obvious solution here when translating into French is to leave out \"investigating magistrate\" and just leave \"juge d\'instruction.\" It\'s surprising that your original did not have the term \"juge d\'instruction\" in inverted commas...

By the way, this ought to have been posted in the English>French section so I am going to move it over to the \"other side\".

Nikki Scott-Despaigne

Moderator FR>EN


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 19:56:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Actually, no, I shall leave this one in the FR>EN section after all as anyone checking the glossary for \"juge d\'instruction\" would find your question useful.

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4404
Grading comment
Actually, I'm translating the text from AmEnglish into Polish, I asked the question to make sure I understand the meaning of the French term inserted. Thank you very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  5Q: Good explanation on the differences in the role of judges or magistrates between UK and France.
13 mins

agree  Jennifer Thomas: and yes, almost two years on and this entry was very helpful to me - thanks!
719 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
investigating magistrate


Explanation:
"investigating magistrate" is the normal translation for "juge d'instruction" I am a criminologist and worked both in France and britain in that capacity, but of course there is no such function in the anglo-saxon system and unless the reader is aware of this, it might be necessary to make that explanation available..." In addition, is not the mention of the "juge d'instruction" in the text just an explanation of the preceding investigation magistrate ? so why the question ?

Is your original text in English or in French?



Brig
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