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societé par actions simplifiée

English translation: do not translate

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:societé par actions simplifiée
English translation:do not translate
Entered by: Maricica W.
Options:
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21:05 Jul 19, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: societé par actions simplifiée
What would a company like this be called in American English.

Thanks very much!

Harold
xxxVadney
do not translate
Explanation:
When referring to a juridical term that doesn't exist in another language, the baest choice is to keep it in the original form, so that the reader would know that you are actually talking about a French juridical institution, and will know where to look for to find its explanation.

If you find an English equivalent, it's ok, but mention the French term.

As reader of juridical texts, i would prefer seeing some text even in a language i don't know, if i can find out faster what it means, and where it comes from, than seeing a good English equivalent that i can find out nothing about.

Use the French term (until bright English-speaking law doctrine finds an equivalent they can agree upon)...

HTH
Veronica Durbaca

Law School Graduate

Selected response from:

Maricica W.
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Limited Liability CompanyPeter Bagney
4 +3do not translateMaricica W.
4 +1Simplified joint-stock company
Ben Gaia MA
5"simplified corporation"Jane Lamb-Ruiz


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Limited Liability Company


Explanation:
***All of a sudden, businesspersons around the country have gotten very
excited by a relatively new way to do business--the limited liability company ... ***


Peter Bagney
Spain
Local time: 04:30
PRO pts in pair: 219

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell: Company with Limited Liability (old hat in German speaking countries)
43 mins

agree  MikeGarcia
48 mins

agree  Paul Mably
7 hrs

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: no, an llc in French is a SARL, société à responsabilité limitée
17 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Simplified joint-stock company


Explanation:
Ltd. is "société à responsabilité limitée"


    Collins-Robert
Ben Gaia MA
New Zealand
Local time: 14:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 111

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxhartran: with answer and remark about Ltd.
31 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"simplified corporation"


Explanation:
new French form of corporation; introduced a few years ago don;t know how it's being translated.

i would just say corporation because it is incorporated but has less paperwork and other details I cna't remember now

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
do not translate


Explanation:
When referring to a juridical term that doesn't exist in another language, the baest choice is to keep it in the original form, so that the reader would know that you are actually talking about a French juridical institution, and will know where to look for to find its explanation.

If you find an English equivalent, it's ok, but mention the French term.

As reader of juridical texts, i would prefer seeing some text even in a language i don't know, if i can find out faster what it means, and where it comes from, than seeing a good English equivalent that i can find out nothing about.

Use the French term (until bright English-speaking law doctrine finds an equivalent they can agree upon)...

HTH
Veronica Durbaca

Law School Graduate




    Reference: http://www.eads.net/eads/en/index.htm?/xml/intl/press/archiv...
Maricica W.
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mary Lalevee: Yes, give the French and the translation.
4 hrs

agree  xxxcmwilliams: Give the French term and perhaps a note of explanation.See www.faccparisfrance.com/them/document327.htm, which explains what it is.
6 hrs

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz
11 hrs
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