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extrait d'acte de naissance

English translation: extract from a birth certificate (Australia); birth certificate (US, Canada, UK)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:extrait d'acte de naissance
English translation:extract from a birth certificate (Australia); birth certificate (US, Canada, UK)
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

06:39 Jul 25, 2002
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: extrait d'acte de naissance
Heading on a birth certificate. Does 'extrait' in this case mean 'extract' or is it part of the usual term 'extrait de naissance'?
Stella Woods
Local time: 15:01
Extract of Birth Certificate
Explanation:
The full details of birth registration are recorded at the Registrar's office. A document made by consulting these records may be called an "Extract of Birth Certificate". This is a common term and should do as a translation.

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Note added at 2002-07-25 06:48:25 (GMT)
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Here is the information that the Australian government supplies about the status of different kinds of birth certificates:-

Birth certificates

In Australia, The Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages issues birth certificates for the State or Territory in which the birth took place.

If you were born in Australia on or after 20 August 1986, in addition to the birth certificate, you will also need to provide evidence that one parent was an Australian citizen or had permanent resident status at the time of your birth.
Copies or extracts of a birth certificate.

Copies or extracts of a birth certificate are not acceptable. If born in Australia, an original full birth certificate issued by a State or Territory Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages must be presented in support of each new adult passport application (but not a renewal form) and each child application regardless of whether a child has had a previous passport. An \"Extract of Birth\" which shows only your name, date and place of birth is not acceptable. Commemorative birth certificates are not accepted.

http://www.passports.gov.au/requirements/birth_certificates....
Selected response from:

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 12:31
Grading comment
many thanks for your assistance
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3Disagree with chosen answermckinnc
4 +3Extract of Birth CertificatexxxR.J.Chadwick
5 +1Extract from Birth EntryxxxR.J.Chadwick
5birth certificatexxxhartran


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Extract of Birth Certificate


Explanation:
The full details of birth registration are recorded at the Registrar's office. A document made by consulting these records may be called an "Extract of Birth Certificate". This is a common term and should do as a translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-25 06:48:25 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is the information that the Australian government supplies about the status of different kinds of birth certificates:-

Birth certificates

In Australia, The Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages issues birth certificates for the State or Territory in which the birth took place.

If you were born in Australia on or after 20 August 1986, in addition to the birth certificate, you will also need to provide evidence that one parent was an Australian citizen or had permanent resident status at the time of your birth.
Copies or extracts of a birth certificate.

Copies or extracts of a birth certificate are not acceptable. If born in Australia, an original full birth certificate issued by a State or Territory Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages must be presented in support of each new adult passport application (but not a renewal form) and each child application regardless of whether a child has had a previous passport. An \"Extract of Birth\" which shows only your name, date and place of birth is not acceptable. Commemorative birth certificates are not accepted.

http://www.passports.gov.au/requirements/birth_certificates....


xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 12:31
PRO pts in pair: 71
Grading comment
many thanks for your assistance

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GILOU
2 mins
  -> Thank you for your support

agree  Linda Young
9 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  poulson
7 hrs
  -> Thank you for your support
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
birth certificate


Explanation:
I checked three dictionaries (including legal) and they all list birth certificate (not extract). I admit being surprised, but apparently for birth certificate, marriage certificate etc.
it is the actual certificate and not an extract, which is logical if you think about it.

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Note added at 2002-07-25 08:41:46 (GMT) Post-grading
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answer to asker;
forget about the magical \'kudoz points\'. of course you can use whatever you want but I\'d like to reaffirm:
3 sources gave just \'birth certificate\'. we are talking about a translation of what something is, not just the words used to express it. it\'s logical anyway. what \'extract\' do you want from a birth certificate. just the name and address, just the date, just the name of official who signed? if you translate everything so literally, especially in legalese, you will run into unimagineable trouble.
as so often on proZ, you can lead a horse to water...

xxxhartran
Local time: 06:31
PRO pts in pair: 52
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59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Disagree with chosen answer


Explanation:
The word extract should not appear in an English translation of this. It is far too much of a direct translation. It's simply a birth certificate

mckinnc
Local time: 06:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 922

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lesley Clayton
8 mins

agree  cmwilliams
29 mins

agree  Clare27
13 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Extract from Birth Entry


Explanation:
In view of the flurry of agreement and disagreement after I posted an answer to this question I feel compelled to make a few extra comments:-

If the original text says "Extrait d'acte de naissance" then the document in question cannot be the certificate (acte) itself. And if the term "extract of birth certificate" (carrying the same implication that the document is not the certificate itself but an extract) exists in English then that should do as the translation.

But thinking about it latter I realized that this is a bit of a vexed question. I myself have two documents which I use as "birth certificates" (loosely speaking). One is titled "Extract from Birth Entry" which is limited to a few details and carries the Registrars signed guarantee that those details accord with the registration records. The second is titled "Birth in the State of XXX" and is what is known (in Australia) as a "full" birth certificate. It contains much more detail and is described as "a true copy of the particulars recorded in a Register kept in the Office of the Registrar General ...".

Both may be loosely referred to as "birth certificates" thugh they have a different status for administrative purposes. But this is not a matter of translation.

PEACE!

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 12:31
PRO pts in pair: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad: Legal terminology is nation-specific. Birth certificate is the standard term used in, i.e., the US for such documents (certifying that birth is registered with state), but it appears your answer is appropriate for Ms Woods, who is also from Australia.
3 hrs
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