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concluant

English translation: petitioner

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:concluant
English translation:petitioner
Entered by: Stephanie Mitchel
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20:25 Aug 24, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / criminal law
French term or phrase: concluant
In a summation, the attorney seems to be referring to his client when he uses the term 'concluant,' but I'm not finding any definition for 'concluant' that would make sense in this context.

'C'est à la demande de M. X que le concluant a été amené à se rendre durant quelques heures par jour, sur une période très courte à l'entrepôt de Noisy.'

It would seem to me that 'the accused' would fit here but I would prefer an equivalent of the term 'concluant.'

Many thanks.
Stephanie Mitchel
United States
Local time: 09:41
the petitioner
Explanation:
First of all: the overall context is not at all clear.

But it does occur to me that the term you could be looking for, depending on context, is "the petitioner".

I have been through a translation problem like this w.r.t. Indonesian language texts -- i.e. where I have had to choose between "the plaintiff" / "the accused" / etc.

The problem with "the accused" is that it certainly does not fit some contexts -- i.e. those where there are no charges filed.

The problem with "the plaintiff" is that it will always (for etymological reasons) carry connotations of there being specific complaints (even if not charges).

"The petitioner" (a time-honoured term) is neutral in these respects -- i.e. it can be applied to someone who asks for something in court (e.g. a legal right) without having made charges or accusations or complaints, etc.

And so it fits certain cases, e.g. insurance claims, and so on, where people go to court merely in pursuit of something owed to them.

If it fits your context then this could be an appropriate term.

However, judging from dictionary definitions (deriving from "conclure") it sounds to me as if it more likely refers to the party to a contract or agreement or to a dispute settlement process.

Having said all that, if the person referred to has instituted a legal process against someone else (which is something you could check from the rest of the text) then "the plaintiff" (as suggested above) would certainly be the best choice (and you do best to ignore my present suggestion).

If, however, the person referred to is responding to a suit brought against him/her, then the complementary term to "plaintiff" (i.e. "defendant") would be best.

See the following dictionary defintion:-

plaintiff
n. [F. plaintif making complaint, plaintive; in Old French equiv. to plaignant complainant, prosecutor, fr. plaindre. See Plaint, and cf. Plaintive.] (Law) One who commences a personal action or suit to obtain a remedy for an injury to his rights; -- opposed to defendant.

Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.

I hope that, in one way or another, this is of some help to you.
Selected response from:

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 21:41
Grading comment
Thanks for the detailed explanation. In fact, it is unclear to me at this point what side the 'concluant' is on - so 'petitioner' will be useful if it remains unclear. The case, by the way, is a criminal one.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2plaintiffcheungmo
5plaintiffPaul Stevens
5the defendant
Alina Matei
4 +1claimant
Jean-Luc Dumont
3my clientMpoma
3concluder
Daniel Bichis
3the petitionerxxxR.J.Chadwick


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
plaintiff


Explanation:
HTH

Paul Stevens
Local time: 14:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 347
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
concluder


Explanation:
This phrase is in the conclusive part of your document - therefore, the defendent takes the position of "concluder"

conclude [knklud]
vb. (mainly tr.)
1. (also intr.) to come or cause to come to an end or conclusion.
2. (takes a clause as object) to decide by reasoning; deduce: the judge concluded that the witness had told the truth.

concluder n.

Daniel Bichis
Romania
Local time: 16:41
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 4
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
claimant


Explanation:
...




Jean-Luc Dumont
France
Local time: 15:41
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 1108

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: if there a payment involved, this would have been it. as so often, not enough context to go on
1160 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the defendant


Explanation:
partial synonym for 'the accused'.
'defendant'= person sued in law-suit. Depends on the law-suit whether you use 'the accused' or 'the defendant'. But the context above seems to favour 'the defendant'.
accused

\Ac*cused"\, a. Charged with offense; as, an accused person. Commonly used substantively; as, the accused, one charged with an offense; the defendant in a criminal case.

defendant = n : a person against whom an action is brought in a court of law [syn: accused, suspect] [ant: plaintiff]

So, it is all about whether it is a civil case or a criminal one. My guess is it is a civil one.

good luck



    Reference: http://www.dictionary.com
Alina Matei
Australia
Local time: 23:11
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 9
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
plaintiff


Explanation:
In most civil law jurisdictions, a plaintiff, rather than filing a statement of claim, files conclusions (as in "logical conclusions" not as in "the conclusion of a concert"). The party in question is referred to, in French, as "le concluant" or "la concluante".

There is no usage I could find for "concluder", the logical literal translation, in English, the usual translation is "plaintiff", and every document I've ever worked on translated "concluant/e" to "plaintiff".


cheungmo
PRO pts in pair: 339

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Isabelle Louis
34 mins

agree  xxxPaulaMac
14 hrs
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1 day8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the petitioner


Explanation:
First of all: the overall context is not at all clear.

But it does occur to me that the term you could be looking for, depending on context, is "the petitioner".

I have been through a translation problem like this w.r.t. Indonesian language texts -- i.e. where I have had to choose between "the plaintiff" / "the accused" / etc.

The problem with "the accused" is that it certainly does not fit some contexts -- i.e. those where there are no charges filed.

The problem with "the plaintiff" is that it will always (for etymological reasons) carry connotations of there being specific complaints (even if not charges).

"The petitioner" (a time-honoured term) is neutral in these respects -- i.e. it can be applied to someone who asks for something in court (e.g. a legal right) without having made charges or accusations or complaints, etc.

And so it fits certain cases, e.g. insurance claims, and so on, where people go to court merely in pursuit of something owed to them.

If it fits your context then this could be an appropriate term.

However, judging from dictionary definitions (deriving from "conclure") it sounds to me as if it more likely refers to the party to a contract or agreement or to a dispute settlement process.

Having said all that, if the person referred to has instituted a legal process against someone else (which is something you could check from the rest of the text) then "the plaintiff" (as suggested above) would certainly be the best choice (and you do best to ignore my present suggestion).

If, however, the person referred to is responding to a suit brought against him/her, then the complementary term to "plaintiff" (i.e. "defendant") would be best.

See the following dictionary defintion:-

plaintiff
n. [F. plaintif making complaint, plaintive; in Old French equiv. to plaignant complainant, prosecutor, fr. plaindre. See Plaint, and cf. Plaintive.] (Law) One who commences a personal action or suit to obtain a remedy for an injury to his rights; -- opposed to defendant.

Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.

I hope that, in one way or another, this is of some help to you.

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 21:41
PRO pts in pair: 71
Grading comment
Thanks for the detailed explanation. In fact, it is unclear to me at this point what side the 'concluant' is on - so 'petitioner' will be useful if it remains unclear. The case, by the way, is a criminal one.
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4567 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
my client


Explanation:
who submits the pleas (conclusions)? The barrister. Who is pleading through the barrister? The barrister's client. Who (supposedly) writes these pleas? The barrister... ergo, "my client".

Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:41
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 68
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