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difference en plus ou en moins, exce'da^t-elle un vingtieme

English translation: any variation therein, even exceeding 5%, to be the purchaser's gain or loss as the case may be

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:différence en plus ou en moins, excédât-elle un vingtième
English translation:any variation therein, even exceeding 5%, to be the purchaser's gain or loss as the case may be
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
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22:10 Oct 15, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: difference en plus ou en moins, exce'da^t-elle un vingtieme
Now I've got some of the rest of the sentence sorted out, this is still confusing me.

It refers to a 'deficit dans la contenance' but then goes on to say 'toute difference en plus ou en moins, exceda^t-elle un vingtieme, devant faire son profit ou sa perte'.

I don't know what they mean. How can you have a 'deficit' and then talk about en plus ou en moins? I wonder if they've just used the wrong word, and what they really mean is if the floor area of the property is misreported, any discrepancy that makes the property either 1/20 bigger or smaller will be to either his (the buyer's I guess?) advantage or disadvantage.

What does anyone else think?
Lucy Simpson
Local time: 23:01
any variation therein, even exceeding 5%, to be the purchaser's gain or loss as the case may be
Explanation:
The vingtieme seems odd - one would expect it to be a limit
Selected response from:

Peter Freckleton
Australia
Local time: 08:01
Grading comment
Glad to have my suspicions backed up - thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +220 % morless
Thierry LOTTE
4COMMENT
Tony M
2 +2any variation therein, even exceeding 5%, to be the purchaser's gain or loss as the case may be
Peter Freckleton


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
20 % morless


Explanation:
"20 pct morless" ( contraction of "more or less").
I Have not red your previous query but having worked 20 years in import export business I may guess it....
In a contract of commodities (wheat, rice, corn etc) it is somehow difficult to fix a final quantity of goods because it may depends on crops/ transport capacities/ etc... so it is usual to mention xxx pct more or less ( usually 5 pct in case of sugar...).

Thierry LOTTE
Local time: 00:01
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 87

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MikeGarcia: ABSOLUTELY!!!
13 mins
  -> Muchas gracias Miguel

neutral  JCEC: 1 / 20 = 20 % ?
27 mins
  -> Ok I am lousy in maths but the meaning remains the same....

agree  monigeha
9 hrs
  -> Tks Monighea
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
any variation therein, even exceeding 5%, to be the purchaser's gain or loss as the case may be


Explanation:
The vingtieme seems odd - one would expect it to be a limit

Peter Freckleton
Australia
Local time: 08:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 722
Grading comment
Glad to have my suspicions backed up - thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, see my comment in answer below
4 hrs
  -> thanks- where is the comment ?

agree  Buzzy: Yes, standard clause in property purchases: people occasionally get surprises when a new surveyor's report is issued!
5 hrs
  -> thanks for the comment
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
COMMENT


Explanation:
Yes, this is an historical throwback to a time when anything less than 'one twentieth part' was regarded as 'normal margin for error', whilst anything more than that was grounds for redress; this is what is being clarified here: EVEN quite a large error must be accepted by the buyer (once the contract has been signed...)

I agree with your basic interpretation, Lucy.

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14064
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