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cour d'assise

English translation: Cour d'Assises (Crown Court)

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07:45 Mar 13, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: cour d'assise
I've seen a number of translations for this: Crown Court, Ciminal Court, Court of Assizes
What would be the best British English equivalent?
Also for
Cour de cassation
tribunal de grande instance
Clair@Lexeme
France
Local time: 11:07
English translation:Cour d'Assises (Crown Court)
Explanation:
As a general rule here, I would stick to the French adding an English near-equivalent in brackets afterwards. The two systems are to different to enable a substitute term to be used safely. Watch out too for "British" equivalent as here Scotland is apart. The notes below apply to England and Wales.

Compare some extracts from the Lord Chancellor’s Dept site with that of the Ministry of Justice site…


http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/cjspub1.html (for general complete info and starting point for all you ever wanted to know about the criminal justice system in England and Wales & never dared to ask!)

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/cjschap3.html#D (the extract on the criminal court structure, with flow diagram thrown in)

See in particular Figure 3.1: The structure of the criminal court in England and Wales ( and compare it to the French equivalent, URL below).




http://www.justice.gouv.fr/justorg/courassi.htm

La Cour d'assises
Elle est située au tribunal de grande instance ou à la cour d'appel. Il y en une par département.
L'examen des affaires criminelles
La cour d'assises juge les crimes, c'est-à-dire les infractions les plus graves prévues par la loi : meurtre, viol, vol aggravé, émission de fausse monnaie...
La loi fixe pour chaque crime une ou plusieurs peines ( ex: emprisonnement pouvant aller jusqu'à la réclusion à perpétuité).
Une juridiction populaire
La cour d'assises est composée :
· du jury populaire : 9 jurés tirés au sort parmi la population française sur les listes électorales
· de 3 magistrats professionnels : un président assisté de 2 assesseurs et d'un greffier.
Une juridiction souveraine
Les décisions de la cour d'assises sont souveraines car elles représentent la volonté populaire.
Nul ne peut modifier le jugement du peuple, sauf en cas de violation de la loi.
Seul un recours devant la chambre criminelle de la Cour de Cassation est alors possible.

Here’s a general idea : as the Cour d’Assises sits to judge serious matters (‘crimes’ rather than ‘délits’, which are dealt with by the Tribunal Correctionnel), includes professional judges and has a jury, it comes close to the English Crown Court.

You may consider that the “chambre criminelle de la Cour de Cassation” is a close equivalent to the Court of Appeal, in so far as the Court of Appeal hears appeals from the Crown Court. The Cour de Cassation does not re-try a case, but will hear appeals on whether the law has been applied correctly. The Cour d’Appel has the power to re-examine a case in certain circumstances.

Finally the “Tribunal de Grande Instance” sometimes operates in a similar way to the English Magistrates’ Court in the type of cases it deals, which although helpful, might be too restrictive for your needs.

So, if you are desperate for a word for word substitute, try the following :
Cour d’Assises = Crown Court
Cour de Cassastion = Court of Appeal
Tribunal de Grande Instance = Magistrates’ Court

Here’s the URL for the organigram for the French system :
http://www.justice.gouv.fr/justorg/justorg5.htm

Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:07
Grading comment
Many thanks and sorry for answering so late!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naAssize Courtashiq mangel
natrail court
lefoque
naCour d'Assises (Crown Court)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
nafurther note
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naCrown Court
Marion Marshrons
naAssize Courtashiq mangel
naCourt of Cassation, or court of appealEmmaS
nadistrict courtEmmaS
na"Cour d'Assises"International Translation Agency Ltd //
naAssizes, Court of AssizesxxxHenri
naAssise CourtEmmaS


  

Answers


13 mins
Assise Court


Explanation:
This site might be of some use to you:
http://www.chez.com/zonzon/code/CPP/pp206.htm


    Reference: http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/
EmmaS
Local time: 10:07
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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19 mins
Court of Cassation, or court of appeal


Explanation:
http://www.courdecassation.fr/
check this site out, it looks helpful!


    Reference: http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/
EmmaS
Local time: 10:07
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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22 mins
district court


Explanation:
answer for tribunal de grande instance


    Reference: http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/
EmmaS
Local time: 10:07
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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54 mins
"Cour d'Assises"


Explanation:
As you may know these terms are difficult to translate because you do not necessarily have an English equivalent institution. However, I usually translate "Assize Court".

Cour de Cassation = Court of Cassation ("decides appeals on points of law and procedure, either upholding a judgement or setting it aside and remitting the matter to a court of appeal for retrial")

Tribunal de Grande Instance = Regional Court (not the best equivalent, but one can live with it!)

R. Titouah





International Translation Agency Ltd //
Local time: 11:07
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Sweetie
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1 hr
Assizes, Court of Assizes


Explanation:
Cour d'assises (Belg. + Fr. + Sw.) =
(UK) Assizes, Court of Assizes,
(US) Circuit Court of Appeal,
(Ir.) Central Criminal Court.

Please note that I am a sworn/certified translator = traducteur juré/ assermenté.


    Le Docte: Legal Dictionary in Four Languages,
    Dr. Herbst: Trilingual Dictionary of Commercial, Financial and Legal Terms
xxxHenri
Local time: 11:07
PRO pts in pair: 49

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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2 hrs
Assize Court


Explanation:
Cour de Casssation : Supreme Court of Appeal
Tribunal de Grande Instance: Crown Court

These terms are a bit confusing mostly because in American English they use different designations. Those I provided are refering to English used in England.

I 'm working as translator in a chamber of Commerce and Industry therefore we often have to deal with disputes between parties.


    Harrap's shorter
ashiq mangel
Pakistan
Local time: 15:07
PRO pts in pair: 30

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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2 hrs
Crown Court


Explanation:
The following dictionary gives the following:

"trial court for serious criminal matters (equiv. UK Crown Court)"


    Dictionnaire de l'anglais economique et juridique, Le Livre de Poche, Librairie Generale Francaise, 1996
Marion Marshrons
Local time: 10:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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2 hrs
Assize Court


Explanation:
Cour de Casssation : Supreme Court of Appeal
Tribunal de Grande Instance = Crown Court. this is a court presided over by three judges, authorized to try more serious cases.

These terms are a bit confusing mostly because in American English they use different designations. Those I provided are refering to English used in England.

I 'm working as translator in a chamber of Commerce and Industry therefore we often have to deal with disputes between parties.


    Harrap's shorter
ashiq mangel
Pakistan
Local time: 15:07
PRO pts in pair: 30

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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2 hrs
trail court


Explanation:
cours d'assise usually means a jury trial occurs
cours d'appels= appellatecourts
cours de cassation supreme court of appeal
cours de grande instance= district court
cours d'arrondissement=municipal court

lefoque
United States
Local time: 05:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 209

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Sweetie
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7 hrs
Cour d'Assises (Crown Court)


Explanation:
As a general rule here, I would stick to the French adding an English near-equivalent in brackets afterwards. The two systems are to different to enable a substitute term to be used safely. Watch out too for "British" equivalent as here Scotland is apart. The notes below apply to England and Wales.

Compare some extracts from the Lord Chancellor’s Dept site with that of the Ministry of Justice site…


http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/cjspub1.html (for general complete info and starting point for all you ever wanted to know about the criminal justice system in England and Wales & never dared to ask!)

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/cjschap3.html#D (the extract on the criminal court structure, with flow diagram thrown in)

See in particular Figure 3.1: The structure of the criminal court in England and Wales ( and compare it to the French equivalent, URL below).




http://www.justice.gouv.fr/justorg/courassi.htm

La Cour d'assises
Elle est située au tribunal de grande instance ou à la cour d'appel. Il y en une par département.
L'examen des affaires criminelles
La cour d'assises juge les crimes, c'est-à-dire les infractions les plus graves prévues par la loi : meurtre, viol, vol aggravé, émission de fausse monnaie...
La loi fixe pour chaque crime une ou plusieurs peines ( ex: emprisonnement pouvant aller jusqu'à la réclusion à perpétuité).
Une juridiction populaire
La cour d'assises est composée :
· du jury populaire : 9 jurés tirés au sort parmi la population française sur les listes électorales
· de 3 magistrats professionnels : un président assisté de 2 assesseurs et d'un greffier.
Une juridiction souveraine
Les décisions de la cour d'assises sont souveraines car elles représentent la volonté populaire.
Nul ne peut modifier le jugement du peuple, sauf en cas de violation de la loi.
Seul un recours devant la chambre criminelle de la Cour de Cassation est alors possible.

Here’s a general idea : as the Cour d’Assises sits to judge serious matters (‘crimes’ rather than ‘délits’, which are dealt with by the Tribunal Correctionnel), includes professional judges and has a jury, it comes close to the English Crown Court.

You may consider that the “chambre criminelle de la Cour de Cassation” is a close equivalent to the Court of Appeal, in so far as the Court of Appeal hears appeals from the Crown Court. The Cour de Cassation does not re-try a case, but will hear appeals on whether the law has been applied correctly. The Cour d’Appel has the power to re-examine a case in certain circumstances.

Finally the “Tribunal de Grande Instance” sometimes operates in a similar way to the English Magistrates’ Court in the type of cases it deals, which although helpful, might be too restrictive for your needs.

So, if you are desperate for a word for word substitute, try the following :
Cour d’Assises = Crown Court
Cour de Cassastion = Court of Appeal
Tribunal de Grande Instance = Magistrates’ Court

Here’s the URL for the organigram for the French system :
http://www.justice.gouv.fr/justorg/justorg5.htm




    Reference: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk
    Reference: http://www.justice.gouv.fr
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3629
Grading comment
Many thanks and sorry for answering so late!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Fuad Yahya

Heathcliff

Sweetie
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs
further note


Explanation:
Note on the Tribunal de Grande Instance, which is part of the civil system in France. It hears disputes between parties where the sums involved are greater than 50,000 F, otherwise, a dispute is dealt with by the Tribunal d'Instance. (One of the particularities of the English Magistrats' Court is that it deals with criminal and civil matters). Cf. the diagram of court system on the French gvt site.


    Reference: http://www.justice.gouv.fr/justorg/justorg5.htm
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3629

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Sweetie
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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