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tchatche

English translation: chit-chat

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tchatche
English translation:chit-chat
Entered by: Bianca AH
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

14:32 Feb 8, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics / slang
French term or phrase: tchatche
This is from something that I translated from French for my research. I can't seem to find the original French sentence, but I kept the word in question in French:

"No matter their role, I asked all the actors in the film to be as natural as possible. This is also reflected in the language, which consists of street slang mixed with African languages and English like an American-styled tchatche that one hears in yuppie bars and night clubs"

I've had a look online, and have found "chat". Though, I don't think this is the same.

TIA!
Bianca AH
France
Local time: 03:00
chit-chat
Explanation:
This is the closest I know of.

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Note added at 4 mins (2006-02-08 14:37:40 GMT)
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Essentially meaning, trivial banter. : )
Selected response from:

Elizabeth Lyons
United States
Local time: 18:00
Grading comment
Thanks again, Elizabeth! I'm probably going to footnote this, so chit-chat fits nicely because of the closeness in sound. Cheers, Bianca
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4here: banter, or simply 'talk'French Foodie
3 +5chit-chat
Elizabeth Lyons
4 +3lingo (in this context); talk, chatterMDI-IDM
4 +1chatting/small talk/chitter-chatter/etc.Michael McCain
3 +1smooth talkingSandra Petch
4 -1to have the gift of the gabCalou


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
chit-chat


Explanation:
This is the closest I know of.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2006-02-08 14:37:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Essentially meaning, trivial banter. : )

Elizabeth Lyons
United States
Local time: 18:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks again, Elizabeth! I'm probably going to footnote this, so chit-chat fits nicely because of the closeness in sound. Cheers, Bianca

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sandra Chiancone: Good one, Liz. Hi! // I've been well, thanks for asking!
1 min
  -> Hi Sandra, just popped on while translating today. Thank you and how have you been?//I look forward to more questions from your interesting projects ; ))

agree  Christine Schmit
2 mins
  -> Thank you so much Christine : )

agree  French Foodie: I posted banter just as you posted your note :-)
12 mins
  -> Thanks, Mara : )

agree  Rachel Davenport: Yes, in this context
2 hrs
  -> Hi Rachel, thank you! : )

agree  Judy Gregg
6 hrs
  -> Thanks so much Judy : )
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
to have the gift of the gab


Explanation:
avoir de la tchatche

Calou
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rachel Davenport: Not in this context
2 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
smooth talking


Explanation:
I think "tchatche" does have this connotation.

Sandra Petch
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  French Foodie: Yes, I think it has that connotation as well.
6 mins
  -> Thanks Mara, we're on the same wavelength here. Your suggestion "banter" works too
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
here: banter, or simply 'talk'


Explanation:
I agree with Calou that when someone "a de la tchatche", then he has the gift of the gab, but in this context I think it could replaced by banter.

"that American-style banter one hears in yuppie bars and night clubs", the idea of "talkin' or chattin' it up".

To be honest, even saying "American-styled talk" works here IMO.

Aristoi.org | France Six: Versailles
We were both biting our tongues as she and some other Americans discovered each
other and exchanged in obnoxious American banter. ...
www.aristoi.org/blog/archives/2004/11/france_six_vers.php - 32k - Cached - Similar pages

Kelleman - A light in the darkness
... for breakfast, lunch and dinner, in the studios, and even in the cafe at night
when you went to seek solace from the constant flow of American banter. ...
www.kelleman.com/text_writing3.html - 18k - Cached - Similar pages

Genetics and Society: Newsletter: Archive: Issue #31
"Lots of American-style talk. We had ethics panels, with the best experts.
We followed all their recommendations."
www.genetics-and-society.org/newsletter/archive/31.html - 46k - Cached - Similar pages

French Foodie
Local time: 03:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sandra Petch
2 mins
  -> thanks Sandra :-)

agree  Laurel Porter: Banter is nice...
31 mins
  -> thanks Laurel

agree  Dr Sue Levy
1 hr
  -> thanks Sue

agree  Peter Shortall
3 hrs
  -> thanks Peter
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
chatting/small talk/chitter-chatter/etc.


Explanation:

... or any synomym of these. Chitter-chatter seems to work well in this case.

Michael McCain
France
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LBMas: small talk -- most of the other suggestions are good, but "small talk" really hits the bar/night club context
10 mins
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
lingo (in this context); talk, chatter


Explanation:
You'll find this link useful; apparently the word came into French from the Spanish "cháchara", which translates as chatter, gab, or chitchat. But in the context of the sentence, I think lingo would fit in nicely.


    Reference: http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/ressources/bibliotheque/dictionna...
MDI-IDM
Local time: 02:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sandra Petch: lingo is great!
1 min

agree  Laurel Porter: I agree with lingo - fits the context best, IMO. I'd almost suggest "patois", but that's a much higher-register word, apparently (I had been unfamiliar with "tchatche" before now).
23 mins

agree  Alison High: lingo is good
31 mins
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