KudoZ home » French to English » Linguistics

les populations riveraines

English translation: populations along the (edges of the) major maritime and road transport routes

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
14:19 Sep 10, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics / NGO
French term or phrase: les populations riveraines
**Les populations riveraines** des grands axes routiers et maritimes des zones transfrontalières (commerçants), fonctionnaires (douaniers, gendarmes, policiers, enseignants, personnel de santé) et les dockers.

I cannot think of a good way of saying it in English, is there a speical term used?
TIA
Mireille K
United States
Local time: 19:41
English translation:populations along the (edges of the) major maritime and road transport routes
Explanation:
I am not entirely happy with this, and not entirely sure I understand the rather parsimonious "context". For example, why is "commerçants" in parentheses? It seems to suggest that the "populations riveraines" are all traders, and the other groups listed are separate items in a list, not further examples of these "populations riveraines". I am fairly sure, however, that this suggestion is wrong. That's part of the reason why I would like to see the whole sentence (at least), to see how it all fits together.

BTW I reordered "road" and "maritime" to avoid confusion, since "road" is a noun in its own right.
Selected response from:

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 01:41
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +9populations along the (edges of the) major maritime and road transport routes
Richard Benham
3 +9neighbouring populations/populations operating in the vicinity ofxxxCMJ_Trans
4 +4resident/living around
Rob Grayson
5"the population in the vicinity of" or "the proximity population of"
gabuss
3 +2local residents
Kate Hudson
4 -4river dwellers
Jennifer Gal


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -4
river dwellers


Explanation:
There's one citation below, but there were many, many hits. I think it comes from my past life as an anthropology major.

Best of luck with your translation! You must be a good translator, beause you get lots of work, and are very often on-line.

Hats off,

Jennifer Gal

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 perc (2006-09-10 14:36:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.granddictionnaire.ca/btml/fra/r_motclef/index800_...

You may be correct in this context, but if you peruse these definitions from le Grand Dictionnaire, you'll see that in many cases it does have to do with bodies of ware (e.g. riparian).


    Reference: http://www.umary.edu/faculty/jlbrud/His471/Power%20Points/Ma...
Jennifer Gal
Hungary
Local time: 01:41
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Richard Benham: Nothing to do with rivers here.//Still nothing to do with rivers. Even in relation to a river, it means on the *banks* of the river.
1 min
  -> See my additional comment above.

disagree  xxxCMJ_Trans: this is clearly one French world that you don't know - in this life or in an earlier one!// you can find virtually anything in a dictionary but in the above sentence it just wouldn't make sense anyway. In transport a riverain is local population
3 mins

disagree  Tony M: Commonly used in FR for anyone on the 'rive' of anything, by no means always a river, as the context above makes perfectly clear! / In all my years as a busy translator with lots of work, I have only rarely encountered this in connection with rivers
5 mins
  -> See my additional comment above.

disagree  xxxdf49f: faux-sens - entirely inappropriate, does not reflect at all the meaning of populations riveraines or even of riverains - see Richard's and CMJ's answers below for correct meaning
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
les populations riveraines des grands axes routiers et maritimes
populations along the (edges of the) major maritime and road transport routes


Explanation:
I am not entirely happy with this, and not entirely sure I understand the rather parsimonious "context". For example, why is "commerçants" in parentheses? It seems to suggest that the "populations riveraines" are all traders, and the other groups listed are separate items in a list, not further examples of these "populations riveraines". I am fairly sure, however, that this suggestion is wrong. That's part of the reason why I would like to see the whole sentence (at least), to see how it all fits together.

BTW I reordered "road" and "maritime" to avoid confusion, since "road" is a noun in its own right.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 01:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Debbie Tacium Ladry: makes the most sense, in light of the context - along the edges of is the key part, I think// nope, wasn't me. Must be an internal malfunction.//no. I opened it anew, once.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks. But it seems you keep reposting this (hitting refresh?) as I got notified by email about it 5 times!//Actually it was 6. You weren't backing up onto the page for instance then?//Let's hope it's stopped!

agree  Tony M: Nice one, RB! / Now we know it's epidemiologiy, I don't think there's any need, 'population' is explicit; and 'along' on its own is fine...
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Dusty. A few months ago I got 128 copies of the same email through this very site. What do you say to adding "working" after "populations"?//Of course, good point! I only asked because you seemed to dislike "populations".

agree  xxxdf49f
6 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Flo Demolis
6 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  jlrsnyder: Larousse says: 1. Qui est situé ou qui habite le long d'une rivière 2. qui est situé ou qui habite le long d'une rue, à la lisière d'une bois, etc.
10 hrs

agree  JCEC
13 hrs

agree  Dr Sue Levy
16 hrs

agree  Gabrielle Leyden: without "on the edges"; "riverains" corresponds to "along"; just for info "les riverains" are often "local residents" in Belgium, at least
17 hrs

agree  Michele Fauble
17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
local residents


Explanation:
One possibility in this contexts;;
The local residents along or around....

Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 01:41
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: The problem, again, is that these 'residents' are then qualified as (shopkeepers/traders) / Because there business activities bring them into contact with an itinerant public... Need I say more?
3 hrs
  -> I don't seem how being a shopkeeper or not affects this -

agree  juliebarba: lots of articles around on this subject ref NGO's, Africa, Big dam being built in Cameroon for example - English sites refer to them as local residents. Why they would suddenly become shop keepers? une hallu encore? as the French would say
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  suezen: local populations is quite sufficient in this context
1 day44 mins
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
neighbouring populations/populations operating in the vicinity of


Explanation:
this is an old way to use the word: population riveraine usually refers to people who live close to something - in this case a major highway or waterway but here it also seems to suggest that they are peope who work in the vicinity because of the proximity of a national border. Maybe the sentences before and after shed some more light?

What is the previous sentence?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2006-09-10 14:36:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and ODD way ( not "old")

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2006-09-10 14:56:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To Jennifer - I'm sorry if you read irritation ino my remarks - it is not meant to be there. It is the same old problem of trying to put a maximum amount of information in these tiny boxes where you soon run out of space. My comment to a05, for example, he or she surely saw the said sign near the CH-F border but it is not related to the border as such. That's what I meant.
Also there is a certain "disagree" that has suddenly been converted into an "agree" which puts a whole new complexion on the exchange. My comment related to that now hidden "disagree" but there is no way anyone who hadn't laready seen it could tell.......

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2006-09-10 14:57:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry - to a "neutral"

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 01:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I think now we have a bit more context, 'population' is fine; I would avoid 'neighbouring', and I don't think there's any need to add 'operating'; 'commerçants' are clearly a subset of the 'population' at special risk
3 mins

agree  Richard Benham: I essentially agree with Dusty on this one. "Operating" is probably justified, given that it seems to be about people earning their money there.
12 mins

agree  a05: Where I saw the sign, "acces interdit" was due to the proximity of the border. I mentioned it as an argument for those who believe it is related to rivers. The border in question is not a river.
1 hr

agree  writeaway: yeah-people living/working in the immediate area
2 hrs

agree  xxxdf49f
6 hrs

agree  Flo Demolis
6 hrs

agree  JCEC
13 hrs

agree  Dr Sue Levy
16 hrs

agree  Michele Fauble
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
resident/living around


Explanation:
"Un riverain" is a resident of an area. In this context, you could equally well say "the population living around...." or "the population living in close proximity to....".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2006-09-10 14:46:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I understand the neutral comments below - I was going for the most general translation given the context (or lack of!).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 44 mins (2006-09-10 15:03:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Having thought I fully understood this term, I've now checked in a couple of different dicos. As a noun, "riverain" is simply a resident. As an adjective (i.e. as used here), it clearly has a connotation of living along (the edge of) something. My suggestion of "around" is therefore not specific enough.

Rob Grayson
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jennifer Gal: We have almost the same word in American English meaning "fluvial", but maybe not in French. Not sure, I'm checking for own peace of mind.
3 mins
  -> Sorry, it has nothing to do wirth river dwellers

neutral  Richard Benham: Two slight problems "riverains" is literally "on the banks", and it seems to be more about how they earn their living rather than where they live.//@Dusty, I agree. The point was that Rob misses out the "edge" part. "Around" is too broad.
4 mins
  -> See my last comment

agree  Fiorsam: OR those who live in proximity of...
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Fiorsam

neutral  Tony M: Although I think a better term ought to exist, I would just like to say to RB that 'riverain' is indeed often used for people having ANY kind of connection with 'along the edges' of something...
8 mins
  -> Fair comment, Tony - point taken.

agree  a05: It is where they live (and earn their living). Near the Swiss-French border one can see signs "acces interdit sauf riverains"
9 mins
  -> Thanks, a05

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: comment to a05 - your comment on the Swiss-French border is irrelevant -
10 mins

agree  xxxPFB: Don'tknow about "resident", but you're right about "around" ("riverain DE" = close to , next to , around, etc...)
17 mins
  -> Thanks, Philippe

agree  xxxsarahl
31 mins
  -> Thanks, sarah

neutral  xxxdf49f: would be closer to living "along" than "around"... - but anyway, these "populations" include more than just residents
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"the population in the vicinity of" or "the proximity population of"


Explanation:
Ceci doit aller je pense

gabuss
Local time: 23:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Sep 11, 2006 - Changes made by Michele Fauble:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO
Sep 10, 2006 - Changes made by JCEC:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search