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inerte

English translation: (thermal) inertia

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:inerte
English translation:(thermal) inertia
Entered by: Colin Ryan
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12:17 Feb 18, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Materials (Plastics, Ceramics, etc.)
French term or phrase: inerte
Maçonnerie des murs constitués d'une double cloison de 40 cm d'épaisseur, formée de briques de terre cuite alvéolaires, Le vide d'air central apportera une meilleure isolation thermique. Ce procédé de fabrication des murs assure une plus grande ___inerte___ et permet donc de réaliser des économies d'énergie.

...My inner child probably knows what this means, since I know how wall insulation works, but I'm damned if I can think of the term.
Colin Ryan
Local time: 05:46
inertia
Explanation:
Winter heat loss from buildings in the northern climates was reduced by using heavy masonry walls, minimizing the number and size of windows, and often using dark paint colors for the exterior walls. The heavy masonry walls used so typically in the late 19th century and early 20th century, exhibit characteristics that improve their thermal performance beyond that formerly recognized (fig. 4). It has been determined that walls of large mass and weight (thick brick or stone) have the advantage of high thermal inertia, also known as the "M factor." This inertia modifies the thermal resistance (R factor) (1) of the wall by lengthening the time scale of heat transmission. For instance, a wall with high thermal inertia, subjected to solar radiation for an hour, will absorb the heat at its outside surface, but transfer it to the interior over a period as long as 6 hours. Conversely, a wall having the same R factor, but low thermal inertia, will transfer the heat in perhaps 2 hours. High thermal inertia is the reason many older public and commercial buildings, without modern air conditioning, still feel cool on the inside throughout the summer. The heat from the midday sun does not penetrate the buildings until late afternoon and evening, when it is unoccupied.
http://www.architecturals.net/conserving-energy-in-historic-...


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Note added at 27 mins (2009-02-18 12:44:39 GMT)
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or would 'thermal inertia' be more precise?

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Note added at 33 mins (2009-02-18 12:50:08 GMT)
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http://www.everguardinsulation.com/pages/wall.html

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Note added at 6 days (2009-02-25 09:13:08 GMT) Post-grading
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Thanks for the points, ryancolm
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:46
Grading comment
Merci!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2inertia
Helen Shiner


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
inertia


Explanation:
Winter heat loss from buildings in the northern climates was reduced by using heavy masonry walls, minimizing the number and size of windows, and often using dark paint colors for the exterior walls. The heavy masonry walls used so typically in the late 19th century and early 20th century, exhibit characteristics that improve their thermal performance beyond that formerly recognized (fig. 4). It has been determined that walls of large mass and weight (thick brick or stone) have the advantage of high thermal inertia, also known as the "M factor." This inertia modifies the thermal resistance (R factor) (1) of the wall by lengthening the time scale of heat transmission. For instance, a wall with high thermal inertia, subjected to solar radiation for an hour, will absorb the heat at its outside surface, but transfer it to the interior over a period as long as 6 hours. Conversely, a wall having the same R factor, but low thermal inertia, will transfer the heat in perhaps 2 hours. High thermal inertia is the reason many older public and commercial buildings, without modern air conditioning, still feel cool on the inside throughout the summer. The heat from the midday sun does not penetrate the buildings until late afternoon and evening, when it is unoccupied.
http://www.architecturals.net/conserving-energy-in-historic-...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 27 mins (2009-02-18 12:44:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or would 'thermal inertia' be more precise?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2009-02-18 12:50:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.everguardinsulation.com/pages/wall.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 days (2009-02-25 09:13:08 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the points, ryancolm

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Merci!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: Agree with your note, "thermal inertia".
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, B D Finch

agree  rkillings: yes, don't leave out 'thermal'. True inertia is kinematic.
10 hrs
  -> Thank you, rkillings
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