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cuisse/jambe

English translation: thigh/leg (medical jargon)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cuisse/jambe
English translation:thigh/leg (medical jargon)
Entered by: Angela Dickson
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11:23 May 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / connective tissue treatment; massage
French term or phrase: cuisse/jambe
I have put this question in PRO because it is from a technical medical document and I am not simply looking for the meaning of the words (otherwise = EASY). I am wondering what the medical distinction is between these two terms, as in the text below. Or are they simply meaning 'the whole leg' (!) - in which case, why not say so! (gotta love the French!)

L’application du Cellu M6 (modèle ES1) a été réalisée pendant 20 minutes sur l’ensemble d’un membre inférieur, cuisse et jambe, choisi par randomisation. L’intensité utilisée était de niveau 3.
French2English
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:11
thigh/lower leg
Explanation:
The standard term for 'whole leg' is 'lower limb' (or 'membre inférieur') - so this is indeed referring to the whole lower limb, thigh and leg - the key point is that 'leg' refers just to the bit below the knee.

It's not just the French - gotta love those doctors!

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Note added at 9 mins (2005-05-17 11:33:05 GMT)
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sorry, the bit in the answer box should read \'thigh/leg\', as that\'s technically correct
Selected response from:

Angela Dickson
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:11
Grading comment
Indeed. Gotta love those doctors, French or not. And I guess it's because the French do have a tendency to be tautological, to say the very least, that I 'got my knickers in a bit of a twist' (to use that quaint English expression) on this one. As I said, I did leave in the word 'lower' in my translation, just to make it absolutely clear. Thanks, Liz
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10thigh/lower leg
Angela Dickson


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
thigh/lower leg


Explanation:
The standard term for 'whole leg' is 'lower limb' (or 'membre inférieur') - so this is indeed referring to the whole lower limb, thigh and leg - the key point is that 'leg' refers just to the bit below the knee.

It's not just the French - gotta love those doctors!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2005-05-17 11:33:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, the bit in the answer box should read \'thigh/leg\', as that\'s technically correct

Angela Dickson
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 246
Grading comment
Indeed. Gotta love those doctors, French or not. And I guess it's because the French do have a tendency to be tautological, to say the very least, that I 'got my knickers in a bit of a twist' (to use that quaint English expression) on this one. As I said, I did leave in the word 'lower' in my translation, just to make it absolutely clear. Thanks, Liz

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  irat56
8 mins

agree  Rachel Fell
8 mins

agree  Marilyn Amouyal: "Jambe" for below the knee is standard in French medical texts.
11 mins

agree  Dr Sue Levy
19 mins

agree  Kate Hudson
23 mins

agree  Angie Garbarino
31 mins

agree  adelinea
38 mins

agree  Catherine Christaki
40 mins

agree  Assimina Vavoula
42 mins

agree  Martine Ascensio
5 hrs
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