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séquelles

English translation: after effect

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22:35 Aug 7, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Register of term
French term or phrase: séquelles
I'm translating a consent form, in which the term séquelles (sequelae) is used repeatedly. In English, sequelae is of a high register, and only those proficient in medicalese would normally use the term. In ordinary English, we would say something like "lasting effects (from X disease/condition/procedure)". Is this term "séquelles" of a similarly high register in French? Or your average man-on-the-street know this term?
Eric Bullington
Local time: 13:01
English translation:after effect
Explanation:
or "relapse"in some cases

séquelles, meaning after effects, is very mainstream in French, not legalese per se
Selected response from:

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 12:01
Grading comment
Thanks Hugo and everyone else who contributed. I received a lot of good feedback on the register of this term.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10after effectJH Trads
4 +1sequelaexxxPRen


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
after effect


Explanation:
or "relapse"in some cases

séquelles, meaning after effects, is very mainstream in French, not legalese per se

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 12:01
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks Hugo and everyone else who contributed. I received a lot of good feedback on the register of this term.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
47 mins
  -> thanks Nancy :-)

agree  xxxdf49f: after-effects yes - and I confirm that séquelles is very much a mainstream "man-in-the-street" term in French, unlike the English term sequelae
1 hr
  -> thanks !

agree  sporran
4 hrs
  -> merci :-)

agree  Barbara Cochran, MFA: Found your exact translation in Lepine's Dictionnaire Francais/Anglais des Termes Medicaux et Biologiques.
4 hrs

agree  franglish
8 hrs

agree  avsie
8 hrs

agree  Natasha Dupuy
9 hrs

agree  Andreas THEODOROU: After-effects since it is for patients. I wouldn't use relapse though.
11 hrs

agree  Marion Sadoux: after effect not relapse, very common term also used metaphorically
12 hrs
  -> Marion you are totally right, "relapse" would be "rechute", yhanks :>

agree  sktrans
16 hrs
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sequelae


Explanation:
In this case, I would use the correct medical term to avoid using a term that may not accurately reflect the original meaning (for example, you could use complications, but that might not cover it), and let the client decide whether they want to use a more "user-friendly" term.

xxxPRen
Local time: 13:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxdf49f: hi Paula: problem is that a consent form (consentement éclairé) must be understood by the man in the street to get a truly "informed/éclairé" consent - would this truly be understood by, say your baker or your cleaning lady??
42 mins
  -> No, but my point is that rather than provide a term that is "user-friendly" but may not cover all the implications of sequela, why not provide the correct translation and let the client pick the best term based on their target audience.

agree  Carmen Schultz
46 mins

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: I can only say that nobody I know would use this word in everyday language and even less understand it - unless old enough to have studied Latin -i.e. ancient
7 hrs
  -> see my comment above.
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