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vanne de type pelle

English translation: sluice valve

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11:01 Feb 18, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Nuclear Eng/Sci / valves
French term or phrase: vanne de type pelle
Hi,

just looking for someone to confirm a term for me

The "Lexique des pipelines à terre et en mer" gives "sluice valve" for "vanne à pelle".
(http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=tgNa8UgQYtkC&pg=PA299&dq="vanne+à+pelle&ei=OeibSajIGYW6yQS6kPT-Cg)

Wikipedia says that a "gate valve" is the same as a "sluice valve".
A Google image search seems to confirm this too.

Contexte:
We're still in a document that is talking about the EPR design and the SEC (essential service water system).
L'eau collectée est alors rejetée dans le canal d'amenée par la mise en place d'un batardeau ou la fermeture d'une vanne de type Pelle.

Can anyone tell me whether they would suggest using "gate valve" or "sluice valve" - or something else?
Please give a little explanation to help me understand your answer.

Thanks!
Philip Watterson
France
Local time: 10:50
English translation:sluice valve
Explanation:
The water collected is then let out in the inlet channel by placing a lock gate or a sluice valve. These sluice valves are used to control the flow of water. It is extensively used to feed water to the pen stock in Hydraulic power stations.
Selected response from:

narasimha
India
Local time: 14:20
Grading comment
Thank you to both answerers for suggestion and explanation. This is the option I plumped for in the end
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1sluice gatexxxBourth
5sluice valve
narasimha


  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
sluice valve


Explanation:
The water collected is then let out in the inlet channel by placing a lock gate or a sluice valve. These sluice valves are used to control the flow of water. It is extensively used to feed water to the pen stock in Hydraulic power stations.

narasimha
India
Local time: 14:20
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you to both answerers for suggestion and explanation. This is the option I plumped for in the end

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  B D Finch: A high level of certainty, but no explanation for why you think this is correct and Bourth's explanation wrong.
3 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sluice gate


Explanation:
a) The AFNOR/Framatome nuclear dictionary gives:
sluice gate (pump station): batardeau (station de pompage)

b) Chambers' Sci&Tech says:
sluice gate(Hyd.Eng.). A barrier plate free to slide vertically across a water or sewage channel or an opening in a lock gate, so controlling flow and enabling a sudden rush of water to be used.

c) Imagine you have a channel in your garden slightly narrower than your garden spade with water running through it and at some point you wish to stop that flow: you stick your spade (pelle) into the channel.

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Note added at 19 mins (2009-02-18 11:20:33 GMT)
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d) More than 20 years of experience translating for dams and irrigation schemes.

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Note added at 24 mins (2009-02-18 11:26:01 GMT)
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Further to that, the Dams dictionary of ICOLD gives "sluice valve" as a synonym for "wedge gate valve", a "robinet-vanne" and shows it as a plate for closing pipe flow, i.e. it is housed in a sealed vertical enclosure above the pipe when open, much like the top part of a tap housing the spindle.

Since your flow seems to be free surface flow in a channel, not a pipe, I'd go for "sluice gate.

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Note added at 1 day8 hrs (2009-02-19 19:22:55 GMT)
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"Batardeau" can be one of several things. It can be a "gate" that is not permanently in place but can be lowered into grooves in the side of a channel using a crane. This is suggested by the "mise en place d'un batardeau" as opposed to the "fermeture d'une vanne". By extension from this "independent" gate leaf, "batardeau" can mean a "proper" gate, one that is permanently installed and operated by its own mechanism, in which case - in dams at least - it can be called a bulkhead gate or guard gate since it is used to protect another gate downstream undergoing maintenance. Usually a "batardeau" of these types only closes into still water, i.e. it won't stop flow, but will hold it stopped.

Hence there is quite some confusion as to what might be meant by "batardeau" here, confusion amplified by the "inclusive/exclusive" meanings of "ou" (Chirac or Mitterand, Sarkozy or "Sarko") AND by the fact that AFNOR gives "batardeau" as "sluice gate" whereas yr text has both "batardeau" AND "vanne pelle". I'm afraid I can't help other than to complexify matters by explaining all the options!

"Batardeau" is often also said when "batardeauX" is meant. These are "stoplogs". The result is the same, it's just that the gate is not in one piece but a series of interlocking "planks" (originally logs). This makes for easier handling by crane.

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Note added at 1 day8 hrs (2009-02-19 19:28:25 GMT)
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Knowing for sure that the section of water conveyance concerned at this point is a channel as opposed to a pipe (which I suspect it is) would make things considerably easier, however, and "installation of a bulkhead gate or closure of a sluice gate" would work.

xxxBourth
Local time: 10:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 218
Notes to answerer
Asker: given that 'batardeau' is one option for the discharge route (see context) - don't we need a different term for the vanne, which would be an alternative option? Isn't the the idea that there is a sluice gate OR some type of valve (sluice valve/gate valve)? (see the context I give)

Asker: I really appreciated your thoughtful, extensive explanations, but on this occasion I have chosen to differ - mainly because of the way I interpret the "ou" in the wider contexte of the paragraphe and document (which I didn't give you, so you couldn't know). I think that they are saying there may potentially be two or more different solution, one with "batardeaux", and another with "vannes type pelle", and they haven't yet decided which it will be. I really appreciate all your help, though!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: The reason for choice of terminology clearly explained, as ever!
3 hrs
  -> Tho' looking @ it again, I'm not so sure this IS open-channel flow. Certainly the water is discharged into a channel, but is it in channel or pipe at the location of this valve/gate. "Batardeau" tends 2 suggest open-channel flow on the upstream side tho'.
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