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courant secondaire technique

English translation: secondary technical power (if specifically measuring current in a transformer secondary: technical secondary current)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:courant secondaire technique
English translation:secondary technical power (if specifically measuring current in a transformer secondary: technical secondary current)
Entered by: Tony M
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02:14 Jul 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Other / other
French term or phrase: courant secondaire technique
It is about an energy/power bay and what it should contain. The exact sentence is
"Trois transformateurs d’intensité pour la mesure des courants secondaires techniques."

"courant secondaire" is clear but "technique"? I did not find any relevant reference anywhere on the net. Do you have any idea what "courant secondaire technique" may be? Thanks a lot.
Diana Chemparathy
United States
Local time: 09:08
secondary technical power
Explanation:
First, in these sort of contexts, 'courant' is often best translated as 'power' (and cf. some recent KudoZ questions;...)

Second, power is described as 'technical' when it is being used to feed technical equipment; in these sort of TV mobile applications it is very important to segregate 'technical', 'domestic' (lighting, heating, etc.) and sometimes 'auxiliary OR services' power, to avoid unwanted interactions / interferenece, and sometimes for load-sharing reasons.

Third, 'secondary' might mean 2 things, but either way it won't change the translation; it might refer to some kind of 'secondary' supply, or it might refer to the current flowing in the 'secondary' winding of a transformer.

Note that those 'transformateurs d'intensité' are current transformers, and that by definition, they measure the CURRENT being consumed; but there is still no reason why you can't translate the 'courant' as power here, since clearly this power can be readily deduced from the current! It's just a slight differnece between the way we look at things in FR / EN, is all.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 53 mins (2005-07-17 08:07:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Three current transformers for measuring secondary technical power\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs 15 mins (2005-07-17 14:29:42 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

This question of \'courant\' is always a thorny one; in everyday, colloquial French, the term is used almost exactly synonymously with the way we in English would say \'(electric) power\' or simply \'electricity\' --- \"we didn\'t get the \'courant\' in our village till 1956\"

In more technical usage, it is very often used in the same sort of way, i.e. to describe electrical power IN GENERAL, rather than specifically the technical characteristic of power (= puissance, measured in watts or kilowatss, for example). In this sense, the word \'energie\' is also often used virtually synonymously.

The technical sense of current is more often rendered in French by \'intensité\' (as it once would have been in English too), and indeed, the internationally-recognized symbol for current (in this physical sense) is I.

So in some ways, \'courant\' in an electrical context might be regarded as something of a \'faux ami\', with the issue being clouded by the fact that we sometimes also use \'current\' (or even more colloquially \'juice\') inaccurately like this in English too!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 344 days (2006-06-26 07:33:41 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Bealted apologies for the typos above — must have been having a 'bad typing' day (when don't I?)

Of course:

interference
difference
kilowatts

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 344 days (2006-06-26 07:39:53 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Oh dear! And I introduced another one with 'belated' :-((
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:08
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Dusty.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4secondary technical power
Tony M
4 -1technical secondary currentsAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
technical secondary currents


Explanation:
can't think what else it could possibly be

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 18:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Please see my own answer for full explanation. Don't you think 4 is rather a high confidence rating in this case?
5 hrs
  -> You're right. I should have put 5. Question of numerology!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
secondary technical power


Explanation:
First, in these sort of contexts, 'courant' is often best translated as 'power' (and cf. some recent KudoZ questions;...)

Second, power is described as 'technical' when it is being used to feed technical equipment; in these sort of TV mobile applications it is very important to segregate 'technical', 'domestic' (lighting, heating, etc.) and sometimes 'auxiliary OR services' power, to avoid unwanted interactions / interferenece, and sometimes for load-sharing reasons.

Third, 'secondary' might mean 2 things, but either way it won't change the translation; it might refer to some kind of 'secondary' supply, or it might refer to the current flowing in the 'secondary' winding of a transformer.

Note that those 'transformateurs d'intensité' are current transformers, and that by definition, they measure the CURRENT being consumed; but there is still no reason why you can't translate the 'courant' as power here, since clearly this power can be readily deduced from the current! It's just a slight differnece between the way we look at things in FR / EN, is all.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 53 mins (2005-07-17 08:07:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Three current transformers for measuring secondary technical power\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs 15 mins (2005-07-17 14:29:42 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

This question of \'courant\' is always a thorny one; in everyday, colloquial French, the term is used almost exactly synonymously with the way we in English would say \'(electric) power\' or simply \'electricity\' --- \"we didn\'t get the \'courant\' in our village till 1956\"

In more technical usage, it is very often used in the same sort of way, i.e. to describe electrical power IN GENERAL, rather than specifically the technical characteristic of power (= puissance, measured in watts or kilowatss, for example). In this sense, the word \'energie\' is also often used virtually synonymously.

The technical sense of current is more often rendered in French by \'intensité\' (as it once would have been in English too), and indeed, the internationally-recognized symbol for current (in this physical sense) is I.

So in some ways, \'courant\' in an electrical context might be regarded as something of a \'faux ami\', with the issue being clouded by the fact that we sometimes also use \'current\' (or even more colloquially \'juice\') inaccurately like this in English too!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 344 days (2006-06-26 07:33:41 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Bealted apologies for the typos above — must have been having a 'bad typing' day (when don't I?)

Of course:

interference
difference
kilowatts

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 344 days (2006-06-26 07:39:53 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Oh dear! And I introduced another one with 'belated' :-((

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 282
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Dusty.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chinesetrans
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Chinese trans!

agree  writeaway: indeed;there are a couple of us who are not able to translate every single field and who tend to leave answering questions in fields they can't do to expert colleagues who can......
1 hr
  -> Thanks, W/A! Couldn't agree more! ;-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
  -> Efharisto, Vicky!

agree  JCEC
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, JCEC!
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