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arrondi (here)

English translation: rounded streamlining

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:arrondi (here)
English translation:rounded streamlining
Entered by: Diana Chemparathy
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19:49 Jul 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Other / other
French term or phrase: arrondi (here)
Hi everyone. another one that gives me headaches...:-) "arrondi" which seems to be a noun here (?). Can anyone give me a translation/explanation for the above word? thanks a lot

"Des aménagements de carrosserie permettront d’assurer une grande esthétique.
En particulier il faudra prévoir:
•Des arrondis ‘‘haut de caisse’’, au dessus du pavillon
•Un arrondi bas de caisse
•L’aménagement d’un arrondi avant dans le cercle de giration, intégrant les compresseurs de climatisation et une échelle encastrée d’accès pavillon."

thanks again.
Diana Chemparathy
United States
Local time: 11:37
See explanation below... [NFG]
Explanation:
As Anna has so rightly said, this must be some kind of rounded edge to the bodywork --- at the top, along the bottom edges, and at the front (presumably this is some kind of semi-trailer?). This was very common at one time (cf. my own mobile, 1963), then went out of fashion, and now seems to be back in again!

I did think of 'rounded fairing', but strictly speaking, that's not QUITE the same thing. This rounded edge will probably have quite a large radius, it's almost certain to be more than just an 'edging strip' or 'bead'

I think it's one (rather optimistic) way to try and make a large, clumsy vehicle appear slightly less so.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 31 mins (2005-07-18 07:21:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although the term is slightly skewed from your case, Vaughan\'s suggestion of \'streamlining\' [Oxford prefers without hyphen] might well be an elegant solution --- though you might need to add in the \'rounded\' or even \'radiussed\', just to be quite clear.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:37
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4See explanation below... [NFG]
Tony M
3 +2roundness/rounded form/rounded edgeAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
roundness/rounded form/rounded edge


Explanation:
:)

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 20:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: 'rounded edge' seems to fit best to my ears, in the absence of a specific term. // Wise move! Can avoid later embarrassment ;-)
2 mins
  -> Thank you Dusty. I kept my CL down just in case!

agree  chinesetrans
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
See explanation below... [NFG]


Explanation:
As Anna has so rightly said, this must be some kind of rounded edge to the bodywork --- at the top, along the bottom edges, and at the front (presumably this is some kind of semi-trailer?). This was very common at one time (cf. my own mobile, 1963), then went out of fashion, and now seems to be back in again!

I did think of 'rounded fairing', but strictly speaking, that's not QUITE the same thing. This rounded edge will probably have quite a large radius, it's almost certain to be more than just an 'edging strip' or 'bead'

I think it's one (rather optimistic) way to try and make a large, clumsy vehicle appear slightly less so.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 31 mins (2005-07-18 07:21:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although the term is slightly skewed from your case, Vaughan\'s suggestion of \'streamlining\' [Oxford prefers without hyphen] might well be an elegant solution --- though you might need to add in the \'rounded\' or even \'radiussed\', just to be quite clear.

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 282

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Vaughn: we used to call this stream-lining
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Vaughan! Indeed, it is to improve the lines, though on such a vehicle, I doubt it would have much real aerodynamic effect.

agree  gad
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gad!

agree  Anne McKee
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Transanne!

agree  Michele Fauble
3 days8 hrs
  -> Merci, Michele !
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