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Mise au blanc/mettre au noir

English translation: daylight / blackout

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Mise au blanc/mettre au noir
English translation:daylight / blackout
Entered by: Felicite Robertson
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19:35 Feb 16, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Other / Tax
French term or phrase: Mise au blanc/mettre au noir
Je cale sur ces termes qui apparaissent dans un document
sur le lavage d'un circuit film (la machine ou passe le film de camera)
Mise au blanc
Ensuite nettoyage
Vérifier le sol et mettre au noir

Auriez-vous des idées?

Merci
Felicite Robertson
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:16
daylight / blackout
Explanation:
I'm assuming this is the same machine that Felicite is asking about in a later question - i.e. it is part of a photographic/motion-picture film manufacturing plant. These machines operate in total black-out conditions. Before opening the machine for cleaning, it would be set to a 'safe for daylight' status, to avoid exposure to daylight of film inside the machine while cleaning is in progress; when cleaning is finished, black-out conditions would be restored. I guess that 'vérifier le sol' means just that: 'check the floor' , i.e. the floor inside the machine.
Unfortunately, I have not been able to find the words actually used by equipment manufacturers for these two conditions.
Selected response from:

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 13:16
Grading comment
Thank you for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3daylight / blackout
Robin Levey
1remove reel / place reelxxxBourth


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
daylight / blackout


Explanation:
I'm assuming this is the same machine that Felicite is asking about in a later question - i.e. it is part of a photographic/motion-picture film manufacturing plant. These machines operate in total black-out conditions. Before opening the machine for cleaning, it would be set to a 'safe for daylight' status, to avoid exposure to daylight of film inside the machine while cleaning is in progress; when cleaning is finished, black-out conditions would be restored. I guess that 'vérifier le sol' means just that: 'check the floor' , i.e. the floor inside the machine.
Unfortunately, I have not been able to find the words actually used by equipment manufacturers for these two conditions.

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 13:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 38
Grading comment
Thank you for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: This looks like it, tho' it is hard to shed light on the jargon!
1 hr

agree  gad
2 days16 hrs

agree  Judy Gregg
3 days12 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
remove reel / place reel


Explanation:
Mediamatrix (got it right this time) has asked very pertinent questions about context, but I'll try to preempt a pertinent guess!

Total guesswork, but I wonder if these are not projectionist's jargon. When working on a horizontal film reeling system with "platters", I can well imagine that "mettre à blanc" could mean "remove the reel", i.e. expose the bare metal (?) of the platter. "Sol" could possibly refer to the platter itself, i.e. a horizontal surface, like the ground. And "mettre au noir" could be "place a new reel of film" since a reel of film appears to be black.

Have not succeeded in finding any relevant ghits to support this, however.

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Note added at 17 hrs (2006-02-17 13:15:30 GMT)
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Further to Mediamatrix's answer below, maybe it's just the jargon for "open" and "close" the machine (or those parts of it where film is wound).

xxxBourth
Local time: 18:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 328
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