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Diseuse

English translation: Reciter (A singer who speaks words to music.)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Diseuse
English translation: Reciter (A singer who speaks words to music.)
Entered by: Gayle Wallimann
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14:56 Mar 8, 2002
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: Diseuse
About singing and voice.
Tan
Reciter (A singer who speaks words to music.)
Explanation:
Many times the French word is used "diseuse" or "diseur"o describe singers who speak to music, usually in rhythm. I can only think of one example off the top of my head. Paul McCartney the beginning of the song "Rocky Raccoon" in this fashion. It started out speaking in rhythm, and then, he did sing.
I can only find "fortuneteller" in Fr-Eng dictionaries.
However, if you look it up in an English dictionary, you will find "reciter". The following is from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Etymology: French, feminine of diseur, from Old French, from dire to say, from Latin dicere -- more at DICTION
Date: 1896
: a skilled and usually professional woman reciter


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Note added at 2002-03-08 15:23:05 (GMT)
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A reciter can also recite poetry, of course. It is not necessary to have music.
Selected response from:

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 02:24
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Reciter (A singer who speaks words to music.)
Gayle Wallimann
4 +1a wit
irat56
5 -1ScattingJane Lamb-Ruiz
4elocutionist
Elisabeth Ghysels
4monologuist
GILOU


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
elocutionist


Explanation:
specifically: female elocutionist.
Greetings,

Nikolaus

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Note added at 2002-03-08 15:01:54 (GMT)
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in other context it\'s: female fortune teller

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 02:24
PRO pts in pair: 200

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  GILOU: c'est davantage un prof de diction
5 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
monologuist


Explanation:
celui qui déclame

GILOU
France
Local time: 02:24
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 2482
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Reciter (A singer who speaks words to music.)


Explanation:
Many times the French word is used "diseuse" or "diseur"o describe singers who speak to music, usually in rhythm. I can only think of one example off the top of my head. Paul McCartney the beginning of the song "Rocky Raccoon" in this fashion. It started out speaking in rhythm, and then, he did sing.
I can only find "fortuneteller" in Fr-Eng dictionaries.
However, if you look it up in an English dictionary, you will find "reciter". The following is from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Etymology: French, feminine of diseur, from Old French, from dire to say, from Latin dicere -- more at DICTION
Date: 1896
: a skilled and usually professional woman reciter


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-08 15:23:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A reciter can also recite poetry, of course. It is not necessary to have music.


    Reference: http://www.m-w.com
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 02:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1213
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lise Boismenu, B.Sc.
2 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  xxxNicola Da Si
23 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Scatting


Explanation:
Jazz singers do scatting, speaking nonsense words in rhyme to the music.
Believe it or not, there is also operatic scat.
But the person who does it is not a scatter. You have to say, She or he scats

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Gayle Wallimann: Scatting is still different than "diseuse". I personally love scat singers, but it's melodious, even if the words are nonsense, whereas a "diseuse" does not have a real melody at all. It's just recitation.
2 hrs
  -> nonsense is not necessarily bad
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a wit


Explanation:
A particular kind of artist, in French and British cabarets, just telling stories to please "soldiers and nurses" just before WWI (Concert Mayol, Le Lapin Agile, and even, I think Le Moulin Rouge) They were followed by "realist singers" Frehel, Yvette Guilbert, and even Edith Piaf. They always used the "double-entendre" with a pretention to witty ends!

irat56
France
Local time: 02:24
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 372

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: a raconteuse, then? there's huge vaudeville tradition and there must be a word for this.
3 hrs
  -> Agree. But apart "story-teller" (slightly different) I can't think of any! Thank tou!
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