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être travaillé

English translation: worried

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21:24 Mar 25, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: être travaillé
Je ne suis pas sûre si c'est une erreur dans cette phrase ou une expression bien québécoise que je ne connais pas.

"Mme nous décrit la réaction génerale de la famille face à l'arrestation et l'incarcération. La mère de XX a fait une dépression (terme utilisé par Mme XX) et son père n'avait pas été travaillé."

Au cas où c'est une erreur, comment suggérez-vous que je la traduit, pour faire connaître que ça ne fait pas de sens?
lcmolinari
Canada
Local time: 14:23
English translation:worried
Explanation:
on dit 'ça me travaille' pour 'ça m'inquiète' c'est peut-être Québecois aussi mais on dit ça ici en France..

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Note added at 2002-03-25 21:28:27 (GMT)
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Harrap\'s :
It\'s been preying on my mind
tormented
worried

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Note added at 2002-03-25 21:57:26 (GMT)
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c\'est possible aussi qu\'il n\'ait pas été travailler mais peut-être est-ce que le reste du contexte aiderait..

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Note added at 2002-03-25 22:20:08 (GMT)
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ma deuxième phrase n\'est pas claire :
-si c\'est vraiment \'travaillé\' cela signifie \'worried\' - On dit cela très facilement (son fils est en prison, ça le travaille)
-s\'il y a une faute d\'orthographe et qu\'en fait c\'est \'travailler\' alors cela signifie \'he had not been to work\'

Selected response from:

Florence B
France
Local time: 20:23
Grading comment
Well, this was a tough one to be sure. I think this suggestion of being worried definitely fits in the context, not going to work just doesn't make much sense, but I have indicated with a note in my translation that the phrase is ambiguous due to possible transcription error. I really appreciate everyone's input.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5has not been to workErika Pavelka
5 +2had not been to workJane Lamb-Ruiz
4 +3had not been to work/had not been able to work???
Parrot
4 +2hasn't been workingKlaus Dorn
4 +1worried
Florence B
5her father had not been back to workmckinnc


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
worried


Explanation:
on dit 'ça me travaille' pour 'ça m'inquiète' c'est peut-être Québecois aussi mais on dit ça ici en France..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 21:28:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Harrap\'s :
It\'s been preying on my mind
tormented
worried

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 21:57:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

c\'est possible aussi qu\'il n\'ait pas été travailler mais peut-être est-ce que le reste du contexte aiderait..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-25 22:20:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ma deuxième phrase n\'est pas claire :
-si c\'est vraiment \'travaillé\' cela signifie \'worried\' - On dit cela très facilement (son fils est en prison, ça le travaille)
-s\'il y a une faute d\'orthographe et qu\'en fait c\'est \'travailler\' alors cela signifie \'he had not been to work\'



Florence B
France
Local time: 20:23
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 753
Grading comment
Well, this was a tough one to be sure. I think this suggestion of being worried definitely fits in the context, not going to work just doesn't make much sense, but I have indicated with a note in my translation that the phrase is ambiguous due to possible transcription error. I really appreciate everyone's input.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcldumas
17 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
has not been to work


Explanation:
Travailler should be written in the infinitive form. It means "son père n'est pas allé au travail" (his father hasn't been to work).

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Note added at 2002-03-25 21:30:51 (GMT)
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I\'ve both seen and heard this used here in Quebec.

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Note added at 2002-03-25 21:34:16 (GMT)
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I\'ve just re-read the sentence, and even though a plus-que-parfait is used in the French, it doesn\'t imply one. I see lots of mistakes in tenses in the texts I translate (all from Quebec).

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Note added at 2002-03-25 21:38:52 (GMT)
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I\'ve just re-read the sentence, and even though a plus-que-parfait is used in the French, it doesn\'t imply one. I see lots of mistakes in tenses in the texts I translate (all from Quebec).

Erika Pavelka
Local time: 14:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 54

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Geller: Definitely
1 hr

agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
1 hr

agree  R. A. Stegemann: As it is a reaction to a past event spoken about in the present. This is the best answer. Hamo
3 hrs

agree  Bits P Ltd
8 hrs

agree  Lise Boismenu, B.Sc.: That's it from Quebec ! Dans le sens de: il ne s'est pas rendu au travail.
14 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
had not been to work/had not been able to work???


Explanation:
It's an interpretation, of course, assuming it's an error, and maybe you'd do well to put the original expression in a footnote. (My parrot would say, "had not been crafted").

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 20:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ALI DJEBLI
5 mins

agree  michael jordan
1 hr

agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
1 hr
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
hasn't been working


Explanation:
Would in my opinion be the correct term in English (present perfect continuous).

As for the French source, my French grammar is a bit rusty, but it should be "n'est pas été travaillé"...but, PLEASE, before everyone beats me up again, I said, my grammar is rusty...

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 21:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: Not me, I don't beat up anyone...
2 mins

agree  xxxPaulaMac
4 mins
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
her father had not been back to work


Explanation:
I also think it should be the infinitive as this is a common enough expression. I would use the above tense to express this.

mckinnc
Local time: 20:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 922
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
had not been to work


Explanation:
This is spoken French, written down.

it merely says he had not been to work. It doesn't say anything more.

For example, "L'autre jour, j'ai été acheté des fringues sur la Rue de Rivoli." The use of ETRE like this instead of saying "je suis allée acheté ou J'ai acheté" is the spoken register of colloquial French.
Another example: T'as été faire tes courses? Instead of: Est-ce tu es allé faires tes courses?

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  michael jordan
21 mins

agree  zaphod: Nice and succint. Very cool.
10 hrs
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