KudoZ home » French to English » Other

'peguins'

English translation: péquin

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:'peguins'
English translation:péquin
Entered by: Red Cat Studios
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:13 Jul 2, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
/ History, jokes, military-civil relations
French term or phrase: 'peguins'
Bonjour. I´m translating a chapter from a book, titled as "Terorism versus democracy" from Emglish into Russian. I´ve made a decision to leave original French text (two phrases). I need translation comment, if possible. Explanations are welcome in English, Spanish, German, Russian. Thanx in advance. That´s my first question in your pair. Grande merci!
There is an amusing anecdote about civil-military hostility in the time of Napoleon. "The French military were at this time extremely arrogant, contemptuously describing civilians as 'peguins' (weaklings)".
Сергей Лузан
Russian Federation
Local time: 01:54
péquin :
Explanation:
I think this is the word better known as 'péquin ' (var. pékin, paican, pécot, pégot,... src Robert historique)

"Péquin



Surnom de civil

Point de "Pékin" dans ce "péquin", mais du provençal "pequin", "chétif, malingre" (en espagnol, "pequeño", en portugais, "pequeno", "petit", etc).
Les soldats de la Révolution, qui venaient du Midi, ont semble-t-il emporté ce mot dans leur besace.

Aujourd'hui, rien de plus imposant que d'entendre un militaire dire "Ah ! c'est un péquin !".
"
http://www.leximot.net/expression.php3?id_expr=1373

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:29:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"PÉKIN : « On nomme Pékin tout ce qui n\'est pas militaire, comme nous appelons militaire tout ce qui n\'est pas civil. » -- Talleyrand. -- « De vieux dialogues militaires des règnes de Henri III et Henri IV emploient souvent le mot piquini ou péquin pour désigner les adversaires en religion. Ainsi, dans un de ces dialogues, nous voyons un papiste traiter Coligny de pékin; un autre est intitulé les Pékins de Montauban. » -- Ambert, Constitutionnel du 25 juin 1854.
\"
http://abu.cnam.fr/DICO/excent/p.html

cela confirme qu\'il s\'agit bien de ce mot qui a été transcrit par \'péguin\'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:49:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

as I see that you have requested explanations in everything but French ;-) -
I have found the same Talleyrand\'s sentence with the word \'pékin\' instead of \'péguin\' - confirming that it\'s the same thing.

Note as well that the word is still used nowadays..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:52:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

translations into English found in Harrap\'s : civilian, guy, bloke
Selected response from:

Florence B
France
Grading comment
Thanx a lot, Oddie. Your idea (expressed in English) is just wonderful and extremely helpful (my explanations in the box above). Put the word into the glossary yourself ' I am not an expert in French.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +2péquin :
Florence B
4 +1pékins or péquinsDPolice
4pushovers
Parrot


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pékins or péquins


Explanation:
the first form is still used in the French army



pékin ou péquin n. masc. (d'un rad. pek -, indiquant le peu d'importance.). Arg. (vieilli ). Nom péjoratif utilisé par les militaires pour désigner un civil.


© 2001 Hachette Multimédia / Hachette Livre



DPolice
Local time: 00:54
PRO pts in pair: 454

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thierry LOTTE: yep
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
péquin :


Explanation:
I think this is the word better known as 'péquin ' (var. pékin, paican, pécot, pégot,... src Robert historique)

"Péquin



Surnom de civil

Point de "Pékin" dans ce "péquin", mais du provençal "pequin", "chétif, malingre" (en espagnol, "pequeño", en portugais, "pequeno", "petit", etc).
Les soldats de la Révolution, qui venaient du Midi, ont semble-t-il emporté ce mot dans leur besace.

Aujourd'hui, rien de plus imposant que d'entendre un militaire dire "Ah ! c'est un péquin !".
"
http://www.leximot.net/expression.php3?id_expr=1373

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:29:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"PÉKIN : « On nomme Pékin tout ce qui n\'est pas militaire, comme nous appelons militaire tout ce qui n\'est pas civil. » -- Talleyrand. -- « De vieux dialogues militaires des règnes de Henri III et Henri IV emploient souvent le mot piquini ou péquin pour désigner les adversaires en religion. Ainsi, dans un de ces dialogues, nous voyons un papiste traiter Coligny de pékin; un autre est intitulé les Pékins de Montauban. » -- Ambert, Constitutionnel du 25 juin 1854.
\"
http://abu.cnam.fr/DICO/excent/p.html

cela confirme qu\'il s\'agit bien de ce mot qui a été transcrit par \'péguin\'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:49:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

as I see that you have requested explanations in everything but French ;-) -
I have found the same Talleyrand\'s sentence with the word \'pékin\' instead of \'péguin\' - confirming that it\'s the same thing.

Note as well that the word is still used nowadays..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:52:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

translations into English found in Harrap\'s : civilian, guy, bloke

Florence B
France
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 753
Grading comment
Thanx a lot, Oddie. Your idea (expressed in English) is just wonderful and extremely helpful (my explanations in the box above). Put the word into the glossary yourself ' I am not an expert in French.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sduret
4 mins

agree  Linda Young
50 mins
  -> mercio à vous deux
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pushovers


Explanation:
I've been looking under glossaries and etymology and can't find any clue at all as to the origins of the expression, but the impression held by the soldiers has always been prevalent throughout history whenever a military caste is confronted with a civilian population (with particular contempt for merchants, who pay the taxes for their conscription).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-02 11:28:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Right guys, I found it in Robert.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 00:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search