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charrette

English translation: a small cart or wagon

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00:18 Aug 26, 2002
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: charrette
it is a French word
Courtney Williams
English translation:a small cart or wagon
Explanation:
A \"charette\" is a small cart: anything from a child\'s wagon to a two-wheel horse-drawn cart.
Selected response from:

cheungmo
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3a small cart or wagoncheungmo
5 +1Yes, gig, but...Atenea Acevedo
4char -ETT
Christopher Crockett
4charette / charette procedure
Libero_Lang_Lab
4gig
Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
3cart, chariot
Nikita Kobrin


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
gig


Explanation:
light two- wheeled one- horsed carriage

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Note added at 2002-08-26 00:31:02 (GMT)
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or
cart

Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
United States
Local time: 19:21
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Libero_Lang_Lab: but not as it is used in English - this being a monolingual question rather than French-English
19 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cart, chariot


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 2002-08-26 00:37:51 (GMT)
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cart - a two- or four-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle for carrying goods or passengers

Nikita Kobrin
Lithuania
Local time: 05:21
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Libero_Lang_Lab: see above
16 mins
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Yes, gig, but...


Explanation:
It is also figurative speech, used to express this:

"A final, intensive effort to finish a project, especially an architectural design project, before a deadline."

Ref: Webster's Unabridged.

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Note added at 2002-08-26 19:29:29 (GMT)
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According to Webster\'s, usage in English (in architects\' jargon) is dated back to the 1960\'s, and comes from the idea of speed of wheels, as in chariots and wagons.

That is, if as I suspect, you wanted to know the usage of a French word in English.

Atenea Acevedo
Local time: 21:21
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
12 mins
  -> Thanx, Dan
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
charette / charette procedure


Explanation:
I suspect that what you may be after is not a carriage (gig by the way is v. old fashioned in this meaning)...

... but a collaborative approach to problem solving / project completion, particularly commonly found in architecture, whereby several teams of architects may contribute work to an overall design..

see this reference in a piece about a project by De Meuron and Herzog - two famous Swiss architects (the charette reference is right at the bottom):

http://www.moma.org/expansion/charette/architects/herzog_meu...

Here's another definition (from the Iowa University website):

The Charette Procedure is a group idea generating and prioritizing tool. Its strength is its ability to address several issues at once in a highly interactive group setting. The charette procedure involves several small groups simultaneously discussing parts of the "big picture," then passing their ideas on to the next group for refinement, enlargement, and eventually, prioritization. The charette procedure is especially useful when a group has decided what they want to do, but is unsure of all the details involved in how to do it.


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Note added at 2002-08-26 01:16:23 (GMT)
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NB it can be spelt charette or charrette


    Reference: http://www.fhzal.com/competitions/2002.html
    Reference: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/communities/tools/decisions...
Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:21
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 102

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jean-Luc Dumont: French but used in English does not make it make it monolingual - Il faudra me dit où tu as acheté ton sens de la traduction intuitive ("suspect") - je te souhaite d'avoir raison mais rien ne l'indique pour l'instant :)
5 hrs

neutral  John Kinory: I have to agree with JLDSF's first point. My French is not up to the rest of it...
9 days
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
a small cart or wagon


Explanation:
A \"charette\" is a small cart: anything from a child\'s wagon to a two-wheel horse-drawn cart.


cheungmo
PRO pts in pair: 339
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: You are probably right. But, what is your authority for this -- I can't find it in Collins Concise (online) French Dictionary or www.thesaurus.com. It is at best an extremely arcane expression that I have not heard before.
2 hrs
  -> My authority? I'm a native francophone.

agree  morrison: Yes wagon
1 day1 hr

agree  evelyn evans: but used mostly in a rural or farming context
3 days10 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
char -ETT


Explanation:
With respects to R.J.Chadwick, but sometimes you just have to get the right tool for the job, and the online Collins Concise French and the www.thesaurus.com just wont cut the mustard, here.

Certainly a French word (Chrétien de Troyes uses it in the 12th century : Lancelot is "Le Chevalier de la Charrette"), but with a venerable history of English usage.

Which the Oxford English Dictionary, as usual, does a pretty good job of summarizing :

"charette. Obs. Forms: 5 charrette, 5-6 charett, 5-7 charette, (6 chear-, chairette), 6-7 charet, charret. [a. OFr. charrette, (charete) wagon, cart, dim. of OFr. charre car sb.1 (prob. of Romanic age: cf. Ital. and med.L. carretta, Sp. and Pr. carreta). In mod.French charrette is a two-wheeled vehicle with two shafts, while chariot is four-wheeled. This distinction may be historical, and may have existed originally in Eng. also; but here, after the shifting of the stress to the first syllable, and consequent obscuration of the termination, charet(te and chariot were confounded and treated as synonymous; and the former became obsolete before the middle of the 17th c., though it virtually survived as a pronunciation of chariot till the 19th c. With six exceptions charet occurs uniformly in the Bible of 1611, but has been everywhere changed in later editions to chariot. ]

1. A wheeled vehicle or conveyance.
b. A war-chariot. (In biblical or classical use.)

--1535 Coverdale Dan. xi. 40 : "And the kinge of the north..shall come agaynst him with charettes."

--Coverdale Zech. vi. 2 : "In the first charet were reade horse."

--1611 Bible Ex. xiv. 7 : Hee tooke sixe hundred chosen charets."


I'd go for char-ETT, even though the OED speaks of the "shifting of the stress to the first syllable" and its transformation into "chariot."

The very new use of the term noted by Dan ("a collaborative approach to problem solving...") shouldn't have any effect on the pronunciation, I should think.

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Note added at 2002-08-26 15:58:52 (GMT)
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Nuts.

I see now that \"char\" is ambiguous --a short \"a,\" as in \"pat \". How about \"cher-ETT,\" as in the French, \"cher\" ?


    Reference: http://www.princeton.edu/~lancelot/
Christopher Crockett
Local time: 22:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 436
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