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lu, écrit, parlé

English translation: fluent, advanced, intermediate or beginner depending on your level

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22:33 Jan 9, 2003
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: lu, écrit, parlé
pour une langue ds un CV
Nicolas
English translation:fluent, advanced, intermediate or beginner depending on your level
Explanation:
Although this is the formula used in France (and possibily other francophone countries), in the UK (I can't talk for the US but they have resumes rather than CVs anyway :-)) we usually describe our level for each language.

This answer is based on the recruitment that I used to do when recruiting linguists whilst running an international banking operation in London.

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Note added at 2003-01-09 23:59:04 (GMT)
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For clarity, the formula referred to at the beginning of the paragraph above is the \"lu, écrit, parlé\" from the original question.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-10 00:35:42 (GMT)
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We also use conversational in place of either intermediate or beginner.
Selected response from:

Peter Coles
Local time: 20:17
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4Written and spoken
lcmolinari
5 +1read, written, spokenxxxBourth
5 +1read, written and spoken / or read, write and speak
Paulette Racine Walden
5fluent, advanced, intermediate or beginner depending on your levelPeter Coles


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Written and spoken


Explanation:
It is assumed that if you can write in a certain language, you can also read.

You might have something like this on your CV:

English (written and spoken)
French (conversational ability only)

lcmolinari
Canada
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  smarinella
1 min

agree  swisstell
17 mins

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: Nicolas, on n'utilise pas les memes formule qu''en France....
18 mins

agree  TREX2
1 hr

neutral  xxxBourth: If proficiency is stated, it might be "excellent" for "lu", "good" for "écrit", and "fair" for "parlé", so all three may have to be kept.
2 hrs
  -> Yes, you're right. I just can't think of any time when I've seen 'read' in this context, i.e. "My spoken English is excellent" but never "My read English is fair" This is why I tried to stay away from using 'read'

agree  Renata Costa
1 day23 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
read, written and spoken / or read, write and speak


Explanation:
When I make my résumé or updating it, this is always on it,Bilingual,
read, written and spoken, French and English.

Paulette Racine Walden
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ioana Bostan
9 hrs
  -> Happy New Year and Thank You!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
fluent, advanced, intermediate or beginner depending on your level


Explanation:
Although this is the formula used in France (and possibily other francophone countries), in the UK (I can't talk for the US but they have resumes rather than CVs anyway :-)) we usually describe our level for each language.

This answer is based on the recruitment that I used to do when recruiting linguists whilst running an international banking operation in London.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-09 23:59:04 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For clarity, the formula referred to at the beginning of the paragraph above is the \"lu, écrit, parlé\" from the original question.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-10 00:35:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

We also use conversational in place of either intermediate or beginner.

Peter Coles
Local time: 20:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 51
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
read, written, spoken


Explanation:
A company I do CVs for uses this formula for the languages of its staff. Each language may have words like "mother tongue" (for all three) or "excellent", "fair", "some"(never "poor" etc. alongside each of these.

xxxBourth
Local time: 21:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Noel Castelino: Exactly. My wife tells me that they have this is United Nations CV forms too (or used to have it).
2 days17 hrs
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