KudoZ home » French to English » Other

Jonchon fecit 1693.

English translation: Jonchon made [this] [in] 1693

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Jonchon fecit 1693.
English translation:Jonchon made [this] [in] 1693
Entered by: Christopher Crockett
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

06:39 Mar 24, 2003
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: Jonchon fecit 1693.
From a French church bulletin's description of an inscription on a plaque.
Nous avons été bénites toutes les trois par Maître Jacques Houyvet prêtre, curé de Canteloup, Jonchon fecit 1693.
Aprille
United States
Local time: 09:25
Jonchon made [this] [in] 1693
Explanation:
Daniela and Francis have the sense of it, and I'll just expand a bit.

"Fecit" is from the Latin "facio" = "to do/make", the ultimate source of the French "faire," which has both these senses as well.

In an artistic context the phrase usually means that X *made* [built, sculpted, painted, etc.] or, sometimes, "was responsible for" (i.e., paid for) whatever is indicated by the context; and was a standard expression of "signature" from at least medieval --if not Roman-- times.

The most famous example of its use, perhaps, is the tympanum of St. Lazare of Autun, which is "signed" with an inscription "GISLEBERTVS HOC FECIT" ["Gilbert made this"] : http://www.art-roman.net/autun6.jpg.

(The inscription is on the band just below the feet of Christ in the web page below.)

Traditionally, this "Gislebertus" has been considered to be the sculptor of the portal, though that has been questioned in a recent book which argues (unconvincingly, I believe) that G. was a *patron* of the work not an artist --but, that's another question entirely. "Fecit" can mean patronage just as well as actual, hands-on production.

Francis' question about whether or not Jonchon was the "graveur" --i.e., whether or not he made the inscription itself-- is a good one, not possible to answer with certainty without more context.

Generally speaking, an inscription itself would not be "signed" unless it were very fancy (or long) and something of a work of art in and of itself.

(In the Autun inscription, Gilbert probably *did* make it himself, but the "hoc" surely refers to the sculpture, not just the inscription.)

Probably the context and content of the inscription which Aprille has will tell us that it is a building, chapel, sculpted tomb or some such structure which is intended.
Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 09:25
Grading comment
Merci bien. An awfully pleasant and informative response.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +6Jonchon made it in 1693
Daniela Falessi
4 +3made by Jonchon in 1693
Francis MARC
5Jonchon made [this] [in] 1693
Christopher Crockett
4done/performed by Jonchon in 1693
Jean-Luc Dumont


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Jonchon made it in 1693


Explanation:
it's Latin. Jonchon is a name, i think.

Daniela Falessi
Local time: 15:25
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jean-Luc Dumont
2 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Francis MARC: I didn't see your answer
22 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting
1 hr

agree  Mike Birch: this the meaning, but for translation leave fecit in Latin
6 hrs

agree  Christopher Crockett: That's it. See my additions below.
6 hrs

agree  Marion Burns
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
done/performed by Jonchon in 1693


Explanation:
fecit - latin for il fit - il a fait - or did or has done

Jean-Luc Dumont
France
Local time: 15:25
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 1108
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
made by Jonchon in 1693


Explanation:
c'est du latin, "Jonchon l'a fait"

Jonchon était-il le graveur ?

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 16:25
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6500

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DPolice
5 mins

agree  xxxEDLING
18 mins

agree  Christopher Crockett: Though it's possible, J. was probably not the "engraver" of the inscription itself.
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Jonchon made [this] [in] 1693


Explanation:
Daniela and Francis have the sense of it, and I'll just expand a bit.

"Fecit" is from the Latin "facio" = "to do/make", the ultimate source of the French "faire," which has both these senses as well.

In an artistic context the phrase usually means that X *made* [built, sculpted, painted, etc.] or, sometimes, "was responsible for" (i.e., paid for) whatever is indicated by the context; and was a standard expression of "signature" from at least medieval --if not Roman-- times.

The most famous example of its use, perhaps, is the tympanum of St. Lazare of Autun, which is "signed" with an inscription "GISLEBERTVS HOC FECIT" ["Gilbert made this"] : http://www.art-roman.net/autun6.jpg.

(The inscription is on the band just below the feet of Christ in the web page below.)

Traditionally, this "Gislebertus" has been considered to be the sculptor of the portal, though that has been questioned in a recent book which argues (unconvincingly, I believe) that G. was a *patron* of the work not an artist --but, that's another question entirely. "Fecit" can mean patronage just as well as actual, hands-on production.

Francis' question about whether or not Jonchon was the "graveur" --i.e., whether or not he made the inscription itself-- is a good one, not possible to answer with certainty without more context.

Generally speaking, an inscription itself would not be "signed" unless it were very fancy (or long) and something of a work of art in and of itself.

(In the Autun inscription, Gilbert probably *did* make it himself, but the "hoc" surely refers to the sculpture, not just the inscription.)

Probably the context and content of the inscription which Aprille has will tell us that it is a building, chapel, sculpted tomb or some such structure which is intended.


    Reference: http://www.structurae.de/fr/photos/img2568.php
    Reference: http://www.art-roman.net/autun.htm
Christopher Crockett
Local time: 09:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 436
Grading comment
Merci bien. An awfully pleasant and informative response.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search