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frisée aux gésiers

English translation: salad with duck meat [OR: tasty morsels of...]

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12:03 May 27, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
/ gastronomic
French term or phrase: frisée aux gésiers
Curly endive salad with gizzards!! Next! I don't think so somehow.

I'm doing a menu as a favour to a friend. Not really my line. I always pitied people having to translate "gésiers" since gizzards sounds ludicrous (and revolting) to an anglophone. I would be very grateful for any help.
mckinnc
Local time: 11:32
English translation:salad with duck meat [OR: tasty morsels of...]
Explanation:
...why not just avoid saying WHICH bit it is? I think it's fairly safe to say it is LIKELY to be duck, and it's safer than 'giblets', since that conjures up all sorts of dodgy images to the squeamish among us.

If you just say 'meat', then nobody's any the wiser, unless they're daft enough to ask for the gory details!

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Note added at 2003-05-27 21:35:26 (GMT)
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In my experience, most English people don\'t know what \'gizzards\' are, and what they IMAGINE them to be is far worse than the reality! But unless you\'ve actually plucked and drawn a duck (as I now have — somewhat reluctantly, it must be said!), I doubt most people would have more than a hazy idea of the anatomy. The only time most of us encounter a gizzard is when we get something stuck in it — and then it\'s very rarely where we\'d imagine it to be! :-))
As for the \"to duck or not to duck\" question — duck gésiers are such a common by-product of the foie gras and magret industry, it\'s fairly safe to assume they will be duck, unless the poultry is home-grown; in any case, for restaurant use, I think chicken gésiers are a less attractive proposition.


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Note added at 2003-05-28 07:46:51 (GMT)
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BTW, I do think it\'s worth keeping the \'curly endive\' — so much more French, and more appetizing than mere \'lettuce\'

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Note added at 2003-06-03 15:16:36 (GMT) Post-grading
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\"Sorry luv — gizzards is orf!\"
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:32
Grading comment
Thanks,

I like this approach best. They actually pulled this item from the menu in the end, thus saving me the bother.

Colin
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3curly salad with giblets
Lanna Castellano
3 +2salad with duck meat [OR: tasty morsels of...]
Tony M
4Salade LandaiseMike Birch
4Curly lettuce with preserved/conserved gizzards.
Florence Evans


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Curly lettuce with preserved/conserved gizzards.


Explanation:
Colin, I agree with you it sounds revolting, but nevertheless so nice to eat.
Even if you do not translate the word, customers are bound to ask what it is and ... well they will get that answer.

Florence Evans
Local time: 11:32
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Maybe redundant to add in the 'confit' — and after all they MIGHT not be!
9 hrs
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
curly salad with giblets


Explanation:
giblets are more acceptable - they include gizzards, and in the Brussels restaurants where they are served in particular they include heart and liver and lights. Most delicious dish in the world unless you're a vegetarian!

Lanna Castellano
Local time: 10:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 377

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz
4 hrs

agree  Peter McCavana: Maybe "curly green salad with giblets". It's true "giblets" somehow sounds nicer than "gizzards"!
7 hrs

agree  herve laurent
10 hrs

neutral  Tony M: I don't agree that 'giblets' sounds nicer than 'gizzards' :-)
19 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Salade Landaise


Explanation:
or more verbosely: 'regional salad of the Landes'
This is a common name on French menus, since most of the gizzards come from the Landes. If further enquiry ensues, the waiter politely explains and, I hope, recommends.

Mike Birch
Local time: 10:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 126
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
salad with duck meat [OR: tasty morsels of...]


Explanation:
...why not just avoid saying WHICH bit it is? I think it's fairly safe to say it is LIKELY to be duck, and it's safer than 'giblets', since that conjures up all sorts of dodgy images to the squeamish among us.

If you just say 'meat', then nobody's any the wiser, unless they're daft enough to ask for the gory details!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-27 21:35:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In my experience, most English people don\'t know what \'gizzards\' are, and what they IMAGINE them to be is far worse than the reality! But unless you\'ve actually plucked and drawn a duck (as I now have — somewhat reluctantly, it must be said!), I doubt most people would have more than a hazy idea of the anatomy. The only time most of us encounter a gizzard is when we get something stuck in it — and then it\'s very rarely where we\'d imagine it to be! :-))
As for the \"to duck or not to duck\" question — duck gésiers are such a common by-product of the foie gras and magret industry, it\'s fairly safe to assume they will be duck, unless the poultry is home-grown; in any case, for restaurant use, I think chicken gésiers are a less attractive proposition.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-28 07:46:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

BTW, I do think it\'s worth keeping the \'curly endive\' — so much more French, and more appetizing than mere \'lettuce\'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-03 15:16:36 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

\"Sorry luv — gizzards is orf!\"

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14078
Grading comment
Thanks,

I like this approach best. They actually pulled this item from the menu in the end, thus saving me the bother.

Colin

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Peter McCavana: Yes, this is an option for the squeamish! (if it _is_ duck)
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Peter! In my experience it so often IS (in restaurants at least) that it's a fairly safe bet...

agree  lien
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, lien!
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