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bis, ter

English translation: "a", "b" / bis, ter

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:bis, ter
English translation:"a", "b" / bis, ter
Entered by: Marion Burns
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16:50 Jun 30, 2003
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: bis, ter
Par la section XX du meme Côde dans ses articles "706 bis" et "706 ter"...



THANKS!
Marion Burns
United States
Local time: 14:03
"a", "b"
Explanation:
It would translate as "706 a" and "706 b".

Robert & Collins Dictionary

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Note added at 8 mins (2003-06-30 16:58:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.arkleg.state.ar.us/1999/scripts/ ablr/code/ark_code1.asp?ctitle=24 - 25k

This link really uses it well.

www.law.harvard.edu/publications/ evidenceiii/rules/706.htm - 10k
Selected response from:

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
I thought it was this, and needed confirmation.

Helpful to get both AE and BE versions. I'd give more points if I could!

Thanks as always!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7"a", "b"
Gayle Wallimann
4 +4bis ter
Francis MARC
5by the 20th section of the same code, articles 706a and 706belagroza
4 +1this is no answer
verbis
5 -1"bis" = twice; "ter" = thrice1045


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
bis ter


Explanation:
the same (latin source)

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Note added at 2003-06-30 17:08:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t claim its english/american but it is used (just look at the english sites on Internet)

The same way bis and ter are no longer used in current french documents, but in some administrations (limited to the counting of 3 items max usually)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-30 17:10:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t claim its english/american but it is used (just look at the english sites on Internet)

The same way bis and ter are no longer used in current french documents, but in some administrations (limited to the counting of 3 items max usually)


Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 21:03
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6500

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christopher Crockett: Unknown in U.S. usage.
2 mins

agree  Jerzy Zubkiewicz: but 706.6 0r 706.7 is OK too
2 mins

agree  verbis: bis, ter . Well-known to people in the branch;))))))))))))
5 mins

disagree  Gayle Wallimann: I have never read or heard of this in English, except when translators have not translated the codes.
5 mins
  -> I mean they use it in english as there is no exact equivalent (but 1, 2, 3 ,or a, b, c ...)

neutral  RHELLER: sorry Francis but this is unheard of in U.S.
8 mins

agree  xxxBourth: The document is in French only (presumably), so keep the titles in French.
36 mins

agree  David Sirett: 1) If it is a French code, you won't find article 706a or 706b. The point of a reference is to locate the text concerned. 2) bis and ter are used extensively in the English texts of international documents (UN, WIPO, etc.).
3 hrs

agree  fnordian: what david sirett said.
10 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
"a", "b"


Explanation:
It would translate as "706 a" and "706 b".

Robert & Collins Dictionary

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2003-06-30 16:58:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.arkleg.state.ar.us/1999/scripts/ ablr/code/ark_code1.asp?ctitle=24 - 25k

This link really uses it well.

www.law.harvard.edu/publications/ evidenceiii/rules/706.htm - 10k

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1213
Grading comment
I thought it was this, and needed confirmation.

Helpful to get both AE and BE versions. I'd give more points if I could!

Thanks as always!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes "706a", "706b".
2 mins
  -> Yes, without the spaces.

agree  Geoffrey D Heath: But usually there's no space between the number and the a or b.
4 mins
  -> I agree, I didn't mean to put the spaces in between, however, it is sometimes with parentheses.

agree  Elisabeth Toda-v.Galen
9 mins

agree  Simon Charass
10 mins

agree  lien
59 mins

agree  Yolanda Broad
3 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
1 day15 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
this is no answer


Explanation:
just want to point out that the experts know and use Latin phraseses and espressions, such as "habeas corpus" , "in absentia" "mutatis mutandis"



lawyers, attornerys and people of the sort understand it, obviously

some others don't

if this doc has to go to Great Britain or to lawyers and judges I'd keep the Latin "bis, ter"
otherwise, ..............................................

ciaooooooooooooooooooooooooo







--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-30 17:16:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

p.s.: sorry for the bad spelling, 41 degrees here;)))))))))))))))))))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-30 17:17:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

pp.ss. keep smilinggggggggggggggggggggggggggg

verbis
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан: Or like that (if this doc has to go to Great Britain or to lawyers and judges to keep the Latin "bis, ter")
1 day14 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
by the 20th section of the same code, articles 706a and 706b


Explanation:
After a number or a digit the equivalent of bis is "a" (ex. 12bis = 12a) and i suppose that for "ter" the equivalent is "b" etc.

elagroza
Local time: 20:03

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gayle Wallimann: Yes, that's exactly what I said before!
1 hr
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
"bis" = twice; "ter" = thrice


Explanation:
*

1045
Canada
Local time: 14:03
PRO pts in pair: 436

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Gayle Wallimann: That might be the meaning, but it isn't used in English in this context.We don't say 706 twice, and 706 thrice.
24 mins
  -> Whether it is used or not in English, I'm just telling you what it means.
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