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chinoiser

English translation: cook at 85 deg., strain and add the...........

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21:04 Jul 10, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: chinoiser
In a recipe for Bavarois:
Cuire à 85 deg., chinoiser et ajouter le beurre de cacao, refroidir ...

Thanks very much!

Harold
xxxVadney
English translation:cook at 85 deg., strain and add the...........
Explanation:
you "strain" liquids, not "filter" nor "sieve", and the utensil used for it is called a "colander" (for straining".

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Note added at 2003-07-10 22:37:07 (GMT)
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You may be right regarding the \"chinois\" but the verb is to strain in any case.
Selected response from:

margaret caulfield
Local time: 13:11
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3cook at 85 deg., strain and add the...........margaret caulfield
4 +2to sieveElisabeth Toda-v.Galen
5filter through a chinois
Grite
4pass/push it through a conical strainer
writeaway
4Filter (can be through a filter (cone-shaped or not) or through a cloth)
Jean-Luc Dumont
3 +1filter
Thierry LOTTE
5 -2To sieveMichel Cosson


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
filter


Explanation:
Filter it in a "chinese hat" filter.

But, as an amateur cooker I really cannot imagine in which part of the receipe you have to filter something....

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Note added at 7 mins (2003-07-10 21:12:17 GMT)
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I mean in a \"Bavaroise\" ( not in a Bavarois as surprinsgly stated...).

Carry on and tell me how good it was.

Thierry LOTTE
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 87

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: sometimes you separate solids/liquids & recombine them later after performing additional cooking procedures or adjusting the taste, for example.
8 mins
  -> Tks Willmatter

agree  Jean-Luc Dumont: on va pas chinoiser - voir mes explications plus bas
39 mins
  -> Merci Jean Luc

disagree  margaret caulfield: Filter is not the term
1 hr
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
To sieve


Explanation:
You sieve flour and you filter liquid! i

Michel Cosson
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Grite: yes, but you don't cook flour at 85 degrees! (see text)
1 min

disagree  margaret caulfield: you only sieve flour and similar
51 mins
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
filter through a chinois


Explanation:
In cuisine, the term "chinois" is used in English. Maybe we should call Julia Child, but personally I am sure.

Here is what Le Grand Dictionnaire has to say about it:
chinois n. m.
Équivalent(s) English: chinois



Définition :
Passoire conique munie d'un manche.


Note(s) :
Il en existe différents modèles : le chinois en étamine métallique sert à filtrer les bouillons les sauces et les crèmes fines, les sirops et les gelées qui demandent à être très lisses; le chinois en fer-blanc perforé sert à passer les sauces épaisses en les foulant à l'aide d'un pilon, pour éliminer les grumeaux.



Grite
United States
Local time: 06:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jean-Luc Dumont: yes exactly - Filter through a chinois or fine sieve
27 mins

disagree  margaret caulfield: neither of these terms
51 mins
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Filter (can be through a filter (cone-shaped or not) or through a cloth)


Explanation:
Passer au chinois ou chinoiser - c'est simplement filtrer un liquide ou une sauce - pour récupérer le liquide et éliminer les morceaux ou grumeaux éventuels

Ensuite passer au chinois ( filtrer à travers un linge propre)
la décoction pour récupérer tout l' alcool.

Cuisinette - [ Translate this page ]
... Passer au chinois ou filtrer le lait infusé, le verser progressivement et lentement
dans le saladier contenant la préparation oeufs-farine et mélanger en ...
www.cuisinette.be/07plat4.htm - 56k - Cached - Similar pages

Médaillons d'agneau sauce groseille - [ Translate this page ]
... Filtrer la marinade brûlante dans la casserole et porter à ébullition en raclant ... Laisser
mijoter 5 minutes, puis passer au chinois dans une casserole propre ...
www.chez.com/titel/Recettes/ Medaillons_agneau_sauce_groseille.html - 8k -


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Note added at 2003-07-10 21:52:08 (GMT)
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Homemade Cranberry Liqueur (Anderson: long form) Recipe
... Gather up the corners of the cloth, and squeeze the solid material remaining of
all the liquid your strength can muster ... Filter again through this funnel ...
www.guntheranderson.com/liqueurs/cranberr.htm - 8k - Cached - Similar pages

Sauce from Bologna
Click Here Sauce from Bologna. ... Drain liquid and filter it through cloth or a
paper coffee filter to remove grit. Finely chop the mushrooms. ...
www.dianaskitchen.com/page/sauce/bologna.htm - 6k - Cached - Similar pages




Jean-Luc Dumont
France
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 1108

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: in order to remove any liquid
12 mins

disagree  Grite: le chinois n'est pas un linge propre; c'est une passoire très fine en métal, de forme conique.
39 mins
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pass/push it through a conical strainer


Explanation:
a chinoise/chinois (it seems both are used in English) is a conical strainer. For the sake of clarity, I'd stick with conical strainer.
ref.: dicos

... hour. Using a wooden spoon, push mixture through a medium-mesh sieve
or conical strainer into a second large pot. Add ground pepper. ...
www.cakebread.com/AHW/AHW_recipes_crepes.htm - 15k -

.. in season, wash them in good red wine and put them trough a sieve or strainer. ... Strain out the wine and push the strawberries through a conical sieve. ...
46k

writeaway
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2881
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
cook at 85 deg., strain and add the...........


Explanation:
you "strain" liquids, not "filter" nor "sieve", and the utensil used for it is called a "colander" (for straining".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-10 22:37:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You may be right regarding the \"chinois\" but the verb is to strain in any case.

margaret caulfield
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 368
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Grite: A chinois is a very specific type of colander, cone-shaped (colanders are usually round)
8 mins
  -> You may be right regarding the "chinois" - which you are - but the verb is to strain in any case

agree  Jean-Luc Dumont: Strain sauce through a fine strainer pushing on the solids to extract flavor - I do think chinoiser here is used just for the meaning - to filter a liquid or strain it thru a fine filtering device - passer au chinois - could have been more specific
27 mins

agree  Tony M: 'strain through a fine sieve' would I'm sure convey the intention if not the utensil...
3 hrs

agree  roneill: Strain is the right verb here.
1 day19 hrs

agree  Yolanda Broad
3 days4 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to sieve


Explanation:
to rub or pass flour, chocolate powder, or whatever, through a sieve, to make it nice ans smooth before using.

Can also be used to filter a liquid which could contain small lumps

Silver Spoon - [ Traduire cette page ]
... 3. Sieve the flour, baking powder and mixed spice into a large bowl. ... 2. Sieve the flour, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda into a large bowl. ...
www.silverspoon.co.uk/foodservice/recipes.asp?cat=64

Elisabeth Toda-v.Galen
France
Local time: 13:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 268

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ethele Salem Sperling
19 hrs

agree  Saleh Ayyub
5 days
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