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câblot

English translation: cablet, anchor cable

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:câblot
English translation:cablet, anchor cable
Entered by: Nikki Scott-Despaigne
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22:00 Nov 4, 2003
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
/ boats, sailing, anchors
French term or phrase: câblot
Pour ne pas diminuer sa résistance par deux, il faut épissurer le câblot directement sur la chaîne et non pas le passer d'abord en boucle.

yes, indeed, it's me with the anchors again!
Rod Darby
Ghana
Local time: 11:48
cablet or grapnel rope
Explanation:
Déf. = Petit câble d'environ 100 mètres de longueur, servant à mouiller les embarcations au moyen d'un grappin ou d'une petite ancre. (Dictionnaire Gruss de marine)
Selected response from:

Robintech
France
Local time: 13:48
Grading comment
super!
I mislaid this question the day before yesterday, as it seems to have decided to be "easy"
many thanks,
Rod

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5hawserxxxBourth
5(small) cable
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4cablet or grapnel rope
Robintech
2 +1COMMENT
Tony M
1drogue
cjohnstone


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
câblot
drogue


Explanation:
thought of it but confirmation ( if fits your context with GDT)

Domaine(s) : - marine activities
maritime navigation


anglais

drogue



Note(s) :
((...)) a drogue is very widely confused with a sea anchor, but in fact the two serve different purposes ((...)). An extremely efficient drogue is made by many sailmakers for use in yachts, etc. It consists of a hollow cone of canvas with a line attached to a bridle at the base of the cone and another line attached to the top. With the cone towed from the bridle and the top line loose, it forms an efficient drogue to slow the yacht down, ((...)).



cjohnstone
France
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1632
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55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
hawser


Explanation:
That's what Ernst says anyway.

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Note added at 2003-11-04 22:59:35 (GMT)
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See nice picture of what you\'re dealing with at:
http://www.banik.org/pratique/Mouillage/LIAISON.HTM

hawser - a large rope used for towing or mooring a ship [Websters]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-04 23:25:16 (GMT)
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On second thoughts, hawser is prob. a bit too big if you\'re talking about messing about in (little) boats.

How about \"rode\" - \"the line attached to the anchor of a small boat\" [Websters]

câbleau ou câblot - cordage de médiocre grosseur [Larousse Lexis]

xxxBourth
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(small) cable


Explanation:
It simply refers to a cable of small diameter. In context, unless there are other (thicker) cables with which it might be confused, indicate which one you are refering to by describing it diferently. Otherwise, simple describing it as the cable, will suffice.

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Note added at 2003-11-06 08:21:49 (GMT) Post-grading
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Cablôt : now I\'m in my ofice and have my nautical dicos with me :

cablôt = boatline, anchor warp, anchor cable

Dic Technique Maritime, Alain CLOUET, Maison du Dictionnaire.


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Note added at 2003-11-06 08:23:02 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

P.S. I\'d avoid using \"grapnel\" as that is usually expressed by \"grappin\".

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4404
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
câblot
cablet or grapnel rope


Explanation:
Déf. = Petit câble d'environ 100 mètres de longueur, servant à mouiller les embarcations au moyen d'un grappin ou d'une petite ancre. (Dictionnaire Gruss de marine)

Robintech
France
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 105
Grading comment
super!
I mislaid this question the day before yesterday, as it seems to have decided to be "easy"
many thanks,
Rod
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
câblot
COMMENT


Explanation:
I'm not sure from the limited context given, but I THINK I know what this is referring to, in which case, I have grave doubts about the previous answers.

I've come across this term in this sort of context many times before, and it seeems to be referring to an extra light-ish rope attached to an anchor, not as the primary mooring (which is the chain), but as a means of lifting the anchor if it gets caught up. Although I've never used one this way myself, I have heard of this being done, but French boatbuilders seem quite obsessed about it!


I suspect Bourth's 'rode' may in fact be the correct answer, though I have to admit I have never heard of this term before.

I don't believe that either 'hawser' or 'cable' is appropriate here.

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Note added at 1 day 10 hrs 48 mins (2003-11-06 08:48:46 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks a lot to Nikki for her helpful explanation!

I just wanted to add that although these are of course the CORRECT definitions, I HAVE come across this term being used innaccurately in this sort of way, so it seems that practical usages are perhaps less precise than we might like. In particular, I have come across the term \'cablôt\' used with a very specific explanation that it was indeed a ROPE and not a wire cable (which are not much liked on smaller boats).

Rod, there is indeed a way that a rope (or wire rope, though this seems much less likely to me) can be \'spliced\' into a chain.

I take the point about the line being more usually attached direct to the anchor --- this would indeed be my thought too.

So maybe this is being used just as a back-up / snatch-trapper for the main chain, as hinted at in your \'guindeau\' question.

By way of anecdote, my landlubberly mother once threw our best brand-new anchor overboard and stood there watching idly on as it and 40 fathoms of chain went over the side --- just as it got to the end, Dad arrived to notice, too late, that the end had never been attached, so we lost the lot! Now there\'s a case where we\'d have been very grateful for a \'cablôt\' :-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14078

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Hawser and cable are not right. However, an anchor rode is a very thin temporary mooring line - but made of rope, nopt of cable. Cf; Dic Techn. Maritime, Alain Clouet, Msn du Dictionnaire. "Anchor cable" is the safest rendering, see additions to my answer
1 day47 mins
  -> Thanks, Nikki!
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