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lors d'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière

English translation: windlass

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:barbotin
English translation:windlass
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
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22:07 Nov 4, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime / boats, sailing, anchors
French term or phrase: lors d'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière
I'd been struggling bravely until I hit this one:
Un conseil: lors d'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière sur la chaîne pour éviter que le barbotin du guindeau supporte tous les efforts de traction.

BTW, I see guindeau being rendered with 'windlass' - I thought they went out with Captain Hornblower, to be replaced by winches, or?
Rod Darby
Ghana
Local time: 03:16
windlass
Explanation:
Windlasses are still very much in use, particularly when it comes to anchors and mooring.


Un conseil: lors d'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière sur la chaîne pour éviter que le barbotin du guindeau supporte tous les efforts de traction.


Hint : on a difficult mooring, shackle a warp/mooring line onto the chain in order to avoid the windlass cable drum/gypsy/wildcat from having to bear the full force of the load.

You might simply prefer to say : "... to prevent the wildcat from having to ..." It is clear from the context that this is refering to the windlass.
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 05:16
Grading comment
another case where it'd be good to share the points, but yours is what I used, Nikki.
Many thanks to all,
Rod
P.S. can I take a rain-check on that Caribbean trip, Dee?
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3windlass
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
5A tip: in a challenging ...
Hermeneutica
3 +1re. windlassxxxBourth
3this might helpEwen Roth


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A tip: in a challenging ...


Explanation:
A tip: in a challenging anchoring situation, it is best to apply a hawser/mooring line directly to the chain in order to prevent the windlass gypsy from bearing the entire traction strain.

Some windlasses are fitted to take both chain and line, see

http://www.muir.com.au/muir/pages/support.html

The line should be a little flexible [nylon] to provide some "give", so that the shock caused by the boat's movement onto the chain is somewhat absorbed by the line [which should be applied tighter than the chain].

You should do this type of thing particularly if anchoring in shallow waters with quite a bit of surf, e.g. when going in close to shore as e.g. in the Caribbean ... aaaahhhh ... or anywhere else where you can expect turbulent waters, perhaps from wind picking up suddenly.

Oh and BTW winches are different ... a windlass is a special kind of winch.

Cheers and HTH

Dee, wishing I were going to sleep on a gently bobbing boat.



Hermeneutica
Switzerland
Local time: 05:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
help with sentence
this might help


Explanation:
Don't know much about boats, but these links might help.
Good luck, HTH.

http://ltswww.epfl.ch/~auric/sailing/memento/vocabulaire.htm...
www.banik.org/pratique/Mouillage/LIAISON.HTM
www.netmarine.net/guides/dico/
permanent.cyconflans.free.fr/glossaire/glossaire.htm
www.marine-marchande.com/glossaire23.htm

Ewen Roth
Local time: 05:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
re. windlass


Explanation:
I'm not a boatie, but I suspect windlass is the "correct" nautical term, possibly especially in relation to anchor weighing devices. "Winch" is certainly used (in America's Cup racing, as commented on NZ TV), but that's for the sails anyway.

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 142

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, a winch and a windlass are not quite the same; these days, 'winch' is mainly used for sail halyards or sheets (or a certain type of windlass), whereas 'windlass' is used for mooring; confusing, as traditionally the forms were the reverse!
8 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
windlass


Explanation:
Windlasses are still very much in use, particularly when it comes to anchors and mooring.


Un conseil: lors d'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière sur la chaîne pour éviter que le barbotin du guindeau supporte tous les efforts de traction.


Hint : on a difficult mooring, shackle a warp/mooring line onto the chain in order to avoid the windlass cable drum/gypsy/wildcat from having to bear the full force of the load.

You might simply prefer to say : "... to prevent the wildcat from having to ..." It is clear from the context that this is refering to the windlass.



    Reference: http://www.maxwellmarine.com/support_glossary.php
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 05:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 178
Grading comment
another case where it'd be good to share the points, but yours is what I used, Nikki.
Many thanks to all,
Rod
P.S. can I take a rain-check on that Caribbean trip, Dee?

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  irat56
4 hrs

agree  Robintech
5 hrs

agree  Tony M: Yes, nicely put, Nikki!
5 hrs
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Changes made by editors
May 2, 2011 - Changes made by Stéphanie Soudais:
Term askedhelp with sentence » lors d\'un mouillage difficile, mailler directement une aussière
FieldOther » Tech/Engineering
Field (specific)(none) » Ships, Sailing, Maritime


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