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saveur propre

English translation: its own (intrinsic) value

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:saveur propre
English translation:its own (intrinsic) value
Entered by: suezen
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14:25 Sep 22, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Philosophy
French term or phrase: saveur propre
Another whopper of a sentence.
I put saveur propre in the title because finding a nice translation for that is one of my issues, but in fact the whole final section from then on is causing me a headache. I'm pretty tired and think I need to take a break from this very dense text. I'll probably see things clearer later, but any suggestions in the meantime would be very helpful.

Very rough attempt:
as an object of desire, it is only ever sought for itself alone, not with an eye to obtaining an advantage.

Repousser le matérialisme est le devoir du savant qui doit pratiquer le détachement, fuir les honneurs et les flatteries nuisibles à la science qu’il recherchera pour sa saveur propre «car objet de désir, elle n’est jamais recherchée que pour elle-même, non en vue de l’obtention d’un avantage.»
French Foodie
Local time: 04:51
its own (intrinsic) value
Explanation:
In other words, the researcher/academic should be detached from wordly goals and work simply for the sake of furthering scientific knowledge
Selected response from:

suezen
Local time: 04:51
Grading comment
Thanks very much everyone for your time and effort - especially on a weekend. I went with intrinsic value and later also used "for its own sake".
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4for knowledge's sake
veratek
3 +2its own (intrinsic) value
suezen
4 +1own flavour
Kévin Bacquet
4 +1(for its) inherent savor
siragui
4as an end in itself
Carol Gullidge
3own benefit/for pleasure's sake
Emma Paulay
2sugg
nolemy


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
its own (intrinsic) value


Explanation:
In other words, the researcher/academic should be detached from wordly goals and work simply for the sake of furthering scientific knowledge

suezen
Local time: 04:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks very much everyone for your time and effort - especially on a weekend. I went with intrinsic value and later also used "for its own sake".

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  veratek: for its own beneficial value
17 mins
  -> thanks Vera

agree  Paul Cohen: Or: it's own intrinsic merit
7 hrs
  -> thanks Paul ... yes, a good option
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
own flavour


Explanation:
You can also use the word "flavour"...
example : Through Individual Case Studies we provide snapshots of a great many initiatives, each with its own flavour; some personal and small scale, as with many of the individual case studies; some more extensive activities


    Reference: http://www.clifton-scientific.org/compendium/intro/foreword....
Kévin Bacquet
France
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cjohnstone
15 mins
  -> Thanks Catherine!
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
for knowledge's sake


Explanation:
w/o more context, I wasn't clear if the author is advocating "knowledge for knowledge's sake" only, or advancing science (including applied and mundane research, so not just knowledge for knowledge's sake) but without falling into the materialistic and glory-filled ambition trap



veratek
Brazil
Local time: 23:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claire Chapman: Given the etymological roots of "saveur" and "savoir," I definitely prefer the use of 'knowledge.'//http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savoir
40 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  Salloz
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  tatyana000: or even just "for it's own sake"
17 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Francis Marche: agree with tatyana: "for its own sake" instead of "for itself alone" and the job is done
1 day8 hrs
  -> Thanks. Although "for knowl's sake " and "for it's own sake" express two different things, one is specific to knowledge, the other to science, which can encompass a set of varied concepts I think.
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
as an end in itself


Explanation:
ie, without any other (ulterior?) motive

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(for its) inherent savor


Explanation:
Pace GWC-Claire, the eymological link between "savoir" and "saveur" has little bearing on the semantic value of "saveur" which means "taste", in the sense of "flavour" (one in a range) or "pungency", "tastiness" etc. It's a figurative way to express a degree of physical, sensual feeling of attraction to knowledge. Whether it's worth sacrificing this nuance in favour of more pragmatic terms like "interest" or "worth" is your business.

PS: I'm all the more convinced the writer didn't have "knowledge" in mind as an echo meaning since historically it has often been believed that "savoir" came from the Latin "scire" (which is why it was spelt "scavoir" for centuries). The confusion persists today.

siragui
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  veratek
30 mins
  -> thanks, vera-tech.

neutral  Claire Chapman: Ignoring your low opinion of the writer's education & intent, the point is to translate the phrase into English. 'Flavor' does not carry the connotations in English that "saveur" does in French. The standard E. phrase is: "Knowledge for knowledge's sake."
18 hrs
  -> It's a free world. No offense meant. I did say "savor", not "flavor", however.
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
sugg


Explanation:
suggestions..
for its very essence,
for its very flavor..

nolemy
France
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
own benefit/for pleasure's sake


Explanation:
Just a couple more words to throw in!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2007-09-23 10:33:53 GMT)
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Relish? (don't laugh)

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: English
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Changes made by editors
Oct 7, 2007 - Changes made by suezen:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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