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cernes jusqu'aux oreilles

English translation: bags under his eyes, all the way to his ears

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cernes jusqu'aux oreilles
English translation:bags under his eyes, all the way to his ears
Entered by: Barbara Cochran, MFA
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19:04 Jun 29, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Physical Description
French term or phrase: cernes jusqu'aux oreilles
A twenty-two year old woman describing the physical appearance of a fifty-five year old British general whom her father wants to marry her off to.

Context: "Le general Burgoyne est un vieillard repoussant, avec des **cernes jusqu'aux oreilles**...Beuh! Autant epouser un crocodile."

I don't feel all that comfortable with "eyes that bulge all the way down to his ears."

Merci!

femme
Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 08:01
bags under his eyes all the way to his ears
Explanation:
Literally. Do we really talk about "luggage" under our eyes as the French talk about "valises"?

And of course the image evokes that of "sourire jusqu'aux oreilles / smile from ear to ear", so maybe :

General Burgoyne is a revolting old man. The bags under his eyes reach from ear to ear, for Heaven's sake. Aaaagh! I might as well marry a crocodile"

Of course "bags/crocodile" works better in English than "cerne/crocodile" in French!
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 14:01
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3set of luggage under the eyesFrench Foodie
3 +2bags under his eyes all the way to his earsxxxBourth
4with ripples of flesh, stretching ear to ear
veratek
3pouchy eyes eating his face awayjean-jacques alexandre
3dark circles under his eyes, stretching from ear to ear
Sarah Llewellyn


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
set of luggage under the eyes


Explanation:
An expression used when bags under the eyes are really big - not just bags but a whole set of luggage :-)

French Foodie
Local time: 14:01
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: never heard it but it's rather good!
5 mins

agree  Jim Tucker: like this one
7 mins

agree  Jenny Duthie
1 hr

neutral  writeaway: not in an 18th century context me thinks
4 hrs
  -> didn't know it was 18th century when I answered
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cernes jusqu\'aux oreilles
dark circles under his eyes, stretching from ear to ear


Explanation:
Hard to find a concise equivalent in English, hence the gloss.
"Set of luggage" might be a little too contemporary for an 18th century text.

Sarah Llewellyn
Local time: 05:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: stretching from ear to ear? across his whole face? one should really research 18th century English a bit to see what expressions were used. But that is for Asker to do, not for Kudoz posters.
1 hr
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
bags under his eyes all the way to his ears


Explanation:
Literally. Do we really talk about "luggage" under our eyes as the French talk about "valises"?

And of course the image evokes that of "sourire jusqu'aux oreilles / smile from ear to ear", so maybe :

General Burgoyne is a revolting old man. The bags under his eyes reach from ear to ear, for Heaven's sake. Aaaagh! I might as well marry a crocodile"

Of course "bags/crocodile" works better in English than "cerne/crocodile" in French!

xxxBourth
Local time: 14:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ormiston: like your comments.Must one mention ears ?
5 mins
  -> Not necessarily.

neutral  writeaway: for 18th century English? /no-that really has to be researched if the aim is to match this with 18th century English.
1 hr
  -> Quite honestly I don't know the 18C English for "bags under the eyes"!

agree  Richard Benham: For a more 18th-century tone, how about "I'd as soon marry a crocodile".
9 hrs
  -> Yes.
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
pouchy eyes eating his face away


Explanation:
just a try at turning it another way

jean-jacques alexandre
France
Local time: 14:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 25
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2 days13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
with ripples of flesh, stretching ear to ear


Explanation:
don't know about 18th cent. usage though

veratek
Brazil
Local time: 09:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Jul 3, 2007 - Changes made by Barbara Cochran, MFA:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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