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zizi

English translation: wiener

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:zizi
English translation:wiener
Entered by: Alanna Wilson-Duff
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07:02 Sep 19, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Comics- humour
French term or phrase: zizi
In a well-known French comic, some young children explore the taboo subjects of the adult world with candour and humour.

What are some possibilities for children's words (US English please) for this part of the anatomy? Thank you.
Alanna Wilson-Duff
Local time: 21:21
wiener
Explanation:
As a Brit, I am ill-placed to judge the exact register of this term, but I've certainly come across it a lot in US material, in what appears to be a comparable register — somewhat childish reference to it as an organ of excretion, without specific sexual overtones.

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Note added at 1 day7 hrs (2007-09-20 14:38:05 GMT)
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Out of idle curiosity, I looked in NS OED, and found that both 'peter' and 'pecker' are listed as found since 'early 20th c.', and the later is listed as 'coarse slang' and 'especially N. America'
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:21
Grading comment
Well, obviously this was a really hard choice to make, and as I said I actaully hope to be using more than one of these in different parts of the text (because little boys really do have a one track mind it would appear!). So thanks everyone for your wonderful brainstorming, and thanks Tony for your meritous un-British knowledge of American juvenile slang!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +8wiener
Tony M
3 +4pipi (or pee-pee)Terry Richards
5 +1peterjean-jacques alexandre
4 +1peckerxxxBourth
4dinkie/dink
Mark Nathan
3peckerforli
2 +1willy
Carol Gullidge
2winkieJennifer White
4 -3tool
Catherine CHAUVIN


Discussion entries: 14





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
willy


Explanation:
works in UK English, but don't know about US (hence the low confidence rating). Otherwise, it would be used by children and is pretty innocuous

Perhaps a US peer could confirm or deny US-ness...

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxJon O: I would love to meet the person who found these terms offensive
10 mins
  -> thanks, John!

neutral  Terry Richards: Not really US
12 mins
  -> thanks, Terry: As I said, I don't know about US usage

disagree  Andrew Levine: Asker specified US English, and this is a very distinctly British term (the sort of word Yanks often make fun of the Brits for using, like "bollocks" or "ta-ta"...)
34 mins
  -> I always realised this could be the case but wasn't sure - Please see my comment above//BTW I don't think tata is used much these days - not universally at least, although bollocks is, a lot, but in a different context

neutral  Tony M: I've always believed this to be very specifically UK, as in "Wee Willy Winkie"
47 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony! I'm sure you're right. I wouldn't know, but thought it worth getting the ball rolling with it anyway!

neutral  juliebarba: or as Mancunians would say "it's the D's Bs" - the dog's bollocks. It's a positive saying though! ;-) / means the same thing - bees knees
1 hr
  -> rather like the D's B's- dunno what it means, but it sounds like the bee's knees!// Nice one! The "Bollocks!" I know is usually pretty negative!

agree  French Foodie: I have to add that I grew up in North America with 3 older brothers, and as little boys they definitely refered to them as their willies, among other things! That said, Canada not US, so perhaps more of a British influence. We're a mixed bunch.
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Mara. Must admit I like the word "willies", but no doubt that's very British!

neutral  NancyLynn: for a UK audience - perfect. In London, in my 20s, a Brit told me his favourite retort to being asked to use a condom: who wants some wally's willy in a welly? LOL but very UK.
5 hrs

neutral  forli: this is completely gratuitous, but a British cricket commentator once reportedly said on live t.v." The bowlers Holding, the batsman`s Willey." during a match between England and West Indies. Don`t you just hope it`s true?
1 day8 hrs
  -> I love that one, have heard it many times, and do believe it's true. Brings a chuckle every time! There was another one about the batsman getting his leg over...
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
tool


Explanation:
Example : my tool is ready for a wee-wee. (lol)
Only kids can say so.

Catherine CHAUVIN
France
Local time: 13:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Terry Richards: More UK adolescent I would say. At least, it was when I was one :)
16 mins

disagree  Tony M: In my experience, this is a much more adult term, and with a much more sexual connotation.
25 mins

disagree  juliebarba: More likely to be seen in a porno mag than for kids ;-)
7 hrs

disagree  Jim Tucker: agree w the others - this is porno language
8 hrs
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
pipi (or pee-pee)


Explanation:
I've heard my friend's son say this in the US but his father is English and maybe he picked it up from him. I've also heard US adults use it in a joking way.

Terry Richards
France
Local time: 13:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  tatyana000: That's what I used to call it when I was a kid.
1 hr

agree  writeaway: at least that is US usage
3 hrs

agree  siragui: Yes, it's US. I used it too!
13 hrs

agree  1045
13 hrs
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
pecker


Explanation:
just a suggestion

forli
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I've always thought of this as a term used more by an adult than a child?
1 min
  -> maybe, but it is difficult to guess the register from a single word.

neutral  1045: I have to agree with Tony ...
12 hrs
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
winkie


Explanation:
This is how my little granddaughter refers to it and it seems to be commonly used at her nursery, but don't know whether this is used in the US.

Jennifer White
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Yes, this is what I grew up with, also 'winkle' — but I think this is very specifically British, all my US friends have laughed when I've used it.
1 min
  -> Oh, really? Well, there you go.......Interesting topic!!!!!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
peter


Explanation:
typically US

jean-jacques alexandre
France
Local time: 13:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 25

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I've certainly heard this term in a US context, though I feel it may be rather dated now? // This is indeed the term proposed by R+C
18 mins
  -> this sort of apparatus transcend the age, hi Tony, thanks

neutral  writeaway: typical US? I never heard it. not amongst kids at at any rate
2 hrs
  -> we must have not played in the same backyards !

neutral  siragui: Must be regional, never ever heard this in the US
10 hrs
  -> not regional, but dated may be, see Tony's comment & answer to W.
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pecker


Explanation:
TTBOMK it's eminently American.

Otherwise cock, knob, and even tassle/tassel, which will have you looking at those dangly bits on your curtains or your partner's pyjama cord in an entirely different light.

For the record, I had to check that "tassle/tassel". It was our family word, and I have never known anyone else to use it, which may simply be an indication of how much I talk about these things outside the family circle since :

TASSEL
Tassel is slang for the penis.
TASSLE
Tassle is slang for the penis
http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZT.HTM


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Note added at 53 mins (2007-09-19 07:55:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Any takers for an English rewrite of Pierre Perret's "Les Zizis"?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 mins (2007-09-19 07:56:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re. Tony's objection above, I'm pretty sure I've seen "pecker" used by and/or for kids on US TV etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-19 08:32:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Register" will also depend on the age of these children. Are we talking preschool or pre-teen, for example? I was thinking pre-teen (probably showing my age!) but it seems to me others here are thinking pre-school.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-09-19 13:52:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re. naivety (or not), remember that the French will refer to themselves or their parents as "maman" and "papa" all their lives. After 27 years here, I still find it strange saying "I'm the papa (daddy) of Edward" when I introduce myself to the parent of a friend of my children, which is what everyone does. VERY few people will say "Je suis le PERE/MERE de ...".

So it wouldn't surprise me if people used "zizi" to a much later age than English-speaking kids might use the pre-school equivalent. In fact it seems to me they do.

Remember too that the word 8-year-olds might use amongst themselves will most likely be very different from the word they would use to their parents or that their parents would use to them. I've overheard my 12-yr-old son using "couilles" and "branler" with friends, but he's never said the words to me, and has blushed whenever I've used "couilles" in conversation with him. I suspect everyone would be happier all round with "zizi", for a child/adult exchange, if any euphemism is to be used, and it seems to me that "pecker", as an Americanism, would apply in the much the same way. For British usage it might (still) be "willy".

xxxBourth
Local time: 13:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Andrew Levine: pecker, cock, and the rest are too "adolescent." It isn't really in the right register...
2 mins

neutral  Tony M: I've not personally encountered it being used child-to-child // Can't personally imagine 'zizi' being used by older children... even my 10-yr-old neighbour thinks it is quite a babyish word
7 mins

agree  juliebarba: I'll agree just because it's a great word. I 'stumbled' across it in the press - that Clinton "couldn't keep his pecker to himself"
57 mins
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
dinkie/dink


Explanation:
My American other half assures me that is common in US English.


Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 13:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +8
wiener


Explanation:
As a Brit, I am ill-placed to judge the exact register of this term, but I've certainly come across it a lot in US material, in what appears to be a comparable register — somewhat childish reference to it as an organ of excretion, without specific sexual overtones.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day7 hrs (2007-09-20 14:38:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Out of idle curiosity, I looked in NS OED, and found that both 'peter' and 'pecker' are listed as found since 'early 20th c.', and the later is listed as 'coarse slang' and 'especially N. America'

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 128
Grading comment
Well, obviously this was a really hard choice to make, and as I said I actaully hope to be using more than one of these in different parts of the text (because little boys really do have a one track mind it would appear!). So thanks everyone for your wonderful brainstorming, and thanks Tony for your meritous un-British knowledge of American juvenile slang!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrew Levine: This is what we grew up calling it
5 mins
  -> Thanks, Andrew!

agree  MDI-IDM: I'd go with this one
30 mins
  -> Thanks, MDI-IDM!

agree  tatyana000
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Tatyana!

agree  French Foodie: Wiener is perfect! When we were little, we used to think it was hilarious to sing "I wish I had an Oscar Myer wiener..." Boy, were we funny...
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mara! Lovely anecdote!

agree  writeaway: nice to be such a well-read Brit TM-yes, it is US usage ;-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, W/A! Well, it all depends WHAT you read... ;-))

agree  NancyLynn: pecker and peter are used around here too, but that may be regional - Eastern Ontario.
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nancy! I've come across 'peter' in more dated contexts, and 'pecker' in more adult ones, but am not convinced about their suitability here

agree  siragui: or weenie!
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Siragui! Yes indeed — and I've seen many different spellings of both variants

agree  1045: or weenie ...
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, J-C! Ditto...
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