KudoZ home » French to English » Poetry & Literature

tue-tete

English translation: at the top of his/her lungs

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
04:02 Jan 10, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
French term or phrase: tue-tete
parler a tue-tete
Chantal Bilodeau
Local time: 02:10
English translation:at the top of his/her lungs
Explanation:
This is how you would say it in Canada. Not sure what your target readership is. Maybe there is a different expression in the UK?
Selected response from:

Diane Partenio
Canada
Local time: 02:10
Grading comment
Thank you. I was trying to figure out if there was a different expression since "s'époumoner" would also be "screaming at the top of one's lungs". I feel there is a slight distinction between the two expressions in French but I guess there is no equivalent in English.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +10at the top of his/her lungsDiane Partenio
5 +5to scream or yell at the top of one's voiceEtienne Muylle Wallace
4To talk (very) loudly.
Juan Jacob
4 -1Talking their heads off...Ysabel812


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
at the top of his/her lungs


Explanation:
This is how you would say it in Canada. Not sure what your target readership is. Maybe there is a different expression in the UK?

Diane Partenio
Canada
Local time: 02:10
Works in field
Grading comment
Thank you. I was trying to figure out if there was a different expression since "s'époumoner" would also be "screaming at the top of one's lungs". I feel there is a slight distinction between the two expressions in French but I guess there is no equivalent in English.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Qingyong Zhang: at the top of one's voice
5 mins

agree  1045
1 hr

agree  Attorney DC Bar
1 hr

agree  Jenny Duthie
4 hrs

agree  Victoria Burns: 'at the top of his/her voice' would probably be more natural-sounding in UK English, although 'lungs' works too
5 hrs

agree  Ingeborg Gowans
8 hrs

agree  NancyLynn: agree with all comments
12 hrs

agree  sporran
13 hrs

agree  Gacela20
1 day3 hrs

agree  Joey O: This phrase is often used in children's stories when describing children singing tue-tete, ex. "Oui-Oui se mit à chanter à tue-tete." Translation from an Enid Blyton story.
1 day22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
To talk (very) loudly.


Explanation:
Parler à tue-tête, should that be.


Juan Jacob
Mexico
Local time: 01:10
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
to scream or yell at the top of one's voice


Explanation:
This does not mean there is no alternative idiomatic expression

Etienne Muylle Wallace
Spain
Local time: 08:10
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Diane de Cicco: yes, "at the top of one's voice" rather than "lungs"
1 hr

agree  ormiston: to yell on its own sounds fine to me
2 hrs

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: why not simple "to talk at the top of one's voice" ? the French is "parler" after all
2 hrs

agree  Nina Iordache
4 hrs

neutral  Carol Gullidge: agree with CMJ - it's fine apart from "scream"!
5 hrs

agree  CarolinaGU
5 hrs

agree  Lany Chabot-Laroche
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Talking their heads off...


Explanation:
I chose this one because in the French, the verb is "parler" and not "crier ou hurler à tue-tête." Are we sure the volume is loud in this context, or are they just talking non-stop?

Ysabel812
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: surely this means chattering away ten to the dozen rather than just making a lot of noise ?
1 hr
  -> I like your expression too!

disagree  Emma Paulay: Sorry, but this has everything to do with volume.
1 hr

agree  Carol Gullidge: in my experience, "talking one's head off" in NEVER done quietly! Regardless of volume, the verb is parler/PS, I think CMJ's expression is "nineteen to the dozen" - at least in UK
3 hrs
  -> I agree re: "talking one's head off," I suppose this expression incorporates both volume and intensity

neutral  Martin Cassell: doesn't work for me -- I would explain this expression as "talking to excess, talking until their heads fall off"
3 hrs

disagree  Diane Partenio: I admit that the verb had me a bit confused at first as well, but it is quite possible to talk at the top of one's voice/lungs (which would of course be a different thing from yelling at the top of one's lungs). But this is definitely about volume.
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (3): Richard Nice, Rob Grayson, Sandra Petch


Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Jan 10, 2008 - Changes made by Sandra Petch:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search