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au fond de mon Louvre

English translation: in the depths of my Louvre

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12:48 Feb 18, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Les Pardaillan
French term or phrase: au fond de mon Louvre
Hi,

It's here:

http://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Les_Pardaillan_-_XII

Car c'est à toi seule que je rêve au fond de mon Louvre

"at the bottom of my Louvre" just wouldn't do it for an English speaker...

Best wishes, and many thanks,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:45
English translation:in the depths of my Louvre
Explanation:
I would translate as 'For it is only you that I dream of in the depths of my Louvre'. There is no reason to omit the actual name of the palace and the word depth has the locative/emotional ambivalence that is required here.
Selected response from:

Diana Muresan
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:45
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3in the depths of my Louvre
Diana Muresan
4 +1lost/wandering/pacing about in my palacexxxBourth
3in the deep heart of my Louvre
Mary Carroll Richer LaFlèche
3alone in my vast palace, the Louvre
B D Finch
3You're the only picture in my "heart" galleryJohn Peterson


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
You're the only picture in my "heart" gallery


Explanation:
Smaltz!

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Note added at 7 mins (2008-02-18 12:56:16 GMT)
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Schmalz!!

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Note added at 8 mins (2008-02-18 12:56:53 GMT)
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with a t!!

John Peterson
Local time: 13:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
in the depths of my Louvre


Explanation:
I would translate as 'For it is only you that I dream of in the depths of my Louvre'. There is no reason to omit the actual name of the palace and the word depth has the locative/emotional ambivalence that is required here.

Diana Muresan
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
many thanks excellent

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxBourth: I would fear, however, that like the Asker, presumably, and another Answerer, the Reader might think of the Louvre as a museum or art gallery, not as a royal palace (unless he has read the book thus far ...)
2 mins
  -> I am inclined to agree with you. I did not read the book, but based on the link provided by the Asker I assumed it was obvious Louvre was the residence of the king at that time. So I would change it to palace only if translated separately from the source

agree  juliebarba: Disagree with B. because it might mean a palace but it is in ref. to the Louvre.Don't think we need to worry about the reader's knowledge/lack of it.Versailles is effectively a museum but we all know what it was & if you don't it, doesn't change the facts
34 mins

agree  Claire Chapman
3 hrs

agree  xxxgiltal
7 hrs
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lost/wandering/pacing about in my palace


Explanation:
The young man in question appears to be Charles IX, and in his mouth "mon Louvre" would refer to the Royal Palace, long before it became a museum.

As for "au fond de" , here it would seem to imply a sense of vastness, and hence of being lost in it, wandering about aimlessly in it, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2008-02-18 13:21:33 GMT)
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The palais du Louvre in Paris, on the Right Bank of the Seine is a former royal palace, situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois. Its origins date back to the medieval period and its present structure has evolved in stages since the sixteenth century.
The Louvre, which gets its name from a Frankish word leovar or leower, signifying a fortified place, according to the French historian Henri Sauval (1623-1676), was the actual seat of power in France until Louis XIV moved to Versailles in 1682, bringing the government perforce with him; the Louvre remained the formal seat of government to the end of the Ancien Régime. [ ... ]
The earliest above ground part of the Palais du Louvre was begun in 1535. The architect Pierre Lescot introduced to Paris the new design vocabulary of the Renaissance, which had been developed in the châteaux of the Loire Valley. His new wing for the old castle defined its status, as the first among the royal palaces
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palais_du_Louvre

Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was King of France, ruling from 1560 until his death. He is best known as king at the time of the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre.

King Charles IX called for calm, but stayed in the safety of the Louvre until Saturday, 26. August, when he left to go the parliament to explain the necessity of giving the command to bump off the Protestants, in order to prevent a conspiracy.
http://www.metropoleparis.com/2003/836/836henri.html

The origins of the Louvre date to 1200 when Philippe August began construction of a fortress on the banks of the Seine. However this original edifice comprised less than a quarter of the present Cour Carrée on the eastern end of the Louvre (the Sully wing of the Museum). [ ... ]
Significant alterations were made by François I (who commissioned the architect Pierre Lescot in 1546), and renovations of the west and south wings were carried out during the reigns of Henri II, Charles IX, and Henri III. (Lescot died in 1571.)
http://www.paris.org/Musees/Louvre/buildhistory.html

Revolutionary passions gave rise to a most laughable error about Charles IX., in connection with the Louvre. During the Revolution hostile opinions as to this king, whose real character was masked, made a monster of him. Joseph Cheniers tragedy was written under the influence of certain words scratched on the window of the projecting wing of the Louvre, looking toward the quay. The words were as follows: "It was from this window that Charles IX., of execrable memory, fired upon French citizens." It is well to inform future historians and all sensible persons that this portion of the Louvre-- called to-day the old Louvre--which projects upon the quay and is connected with the Louvre by the room called the Apollo gallery (while the great halls of the Museum connect the Louvre with the Tuileries) did not exist in the time of Charles IX. The greater part of the space where the frontage on the quay now stands, and where the Garden of the Infanta is laid out, was then occupied by the hotel de Bourbon, which belonged to and was the residence of the house of Navarre. It was absolutely impossible, therefore, for Charles IX. to fire from the Louvre of Henri II. upon a boat full of Huguenots crossing the river, although at the present time the Seine can be seen from its windows.
http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/lit/debalzac/Ca...



xxxBourth
Local time: 14:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Peterson: You're right - I didn't look at the link (couldn't resist the urge to post!) - so I'd go along with the notion of a palace.
22 mins

neutral  juliebarba: I think it should still have Louvre in it somehow. Like it or not and inspite of what a reader might understand it is in reference to the Louvre! and all your links show that it's fine to use it
34 mins
  -> All depends if this passage is isolated and/or intended to be meaningful, etc., what the non-French reader is expected to know about French architecture, history, culture, etc. Imagine how much "Sandringham" might mean to a Frenchman ...
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
alone in my vast palace, the Louvre


Explanation:
Expanding it somewhat, but trying to capture the spirit of what is communicated.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 14:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
in the deep heart of my Louvre


Explanation:
Louvre is important, you can't just eliminate it

Mary Carroll Richer LaFlèche
Canada
Local time: 08:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
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