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pavillon anglais

English translation: English bungalow

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:pavillon anglais
English translation:English bungalow
Entered by: Ken Fagan
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

19:27 Jul 9, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Real Estate / promesse de vente
French term or phrase: pavillon anglais
unable to give any context (sorry!)
Ken Fagan
Local time: 02:09
English bungalow
Explanation:
one of many possibilities

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Note added at 6 mins (2008-07-09 19:33:48 GMT)
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cottage

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Note added at 19 mins (2008-07-09 19:47:17 GMT)
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outlying cottage/bungalow (if that is indeed the case)
Selected response from:

Jonathan MacKerron
Grading comment
thank you, Jonathan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +5English bungalow
Jonathan MacKerron
4English-style property/residence
Sheila Wilson
3(English) building or wing
David Mousseau
3family residence in the English style
Robin Levey
2also [a sort of naval flag]
Helen Shiner


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
English bungalow


Explanation:
one of many possibilities

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Note added at 6 mins (2008-07-09 19:33:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

cottage

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2008-07-09 19:47:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

outlying cottage/bungalow (if that is indeed the case)

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
thank you, Jonathan

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Robin Levey: I don't see how this fits with the context just provided by Ken (apparently it's in France, so it's French not English, and its a house, not a bungalow).
1 hr

agree  rkillings: "English cottage" should do it. Especially if it's rather grand -- that would preserve the irony of 'pavillon'.
1 hr

agree  David Mousseau: I would say "English-style bungalow", because I'm not sure if "English bungalow" is an accepted term
7 hrs

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
8 hrs

agree  Laurence Idezak: English cottage or English-style bungalow
10 hrs

agree  jean-jacques alexandre: agree w/ David : "english style....."
12 hrs

neutral  B D Finch: Have you any evidence that this would be a bungalow rather than being 2 or more storeys?
1 day20 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
family residence in the English style


Explanation:
I'm sure an estate agent would find something more poetic than this, but I'm no agent and no poet...

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-07-09 20:42:31 GMT)
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Re Ken's note below: You're the poet, Ken, not me! If you like it ... use it!

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Notes to answerer
Asker: how about "English style family residence"?

Asker: thank you

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
also [a sort of naval flag]


Explanation:
Just want to throw this into the mix on the off-chance... There are lots of references on google to this term - most seem to refer to a sort of naval flag. See links below. I know it most probably is a building, but it could it be a flag in the garden, could it? Or am I completely missing some sort of trenchant Gallic humour here? Certainly also used in a metaphorical sense, too: http://www.lesechos.fr/info/agro/300153157.htm


    Reference: http://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/pavillon
    Reference: http://www.infos-dieppoises.fr/Archives2002/DieppePavillonAn...
Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(English) building or wing


Explanation:

Here at the university in Québec, and in other large institutions generally, we refer to the different buildings as "pavillons". For example, when I was a student, most of my courses (and where I currently work) were in a building called "De Koninck" - "Pavillon De Koninck" ("The De Koninck building").

Context would be extremely helpful here ;)

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Note added at 7 hrs (2008-07-10 03:09:02 GMT)
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I've since seen the context provided (one of several houses in a complex). Therefore, "building" or "wing" is obviously out.

If I were doing this, I'd keep it simple: something like "English-style house", or even "unit" (if it's a more technical document), or "bungalow", as Jonathan suggested, if that indeed fits the context.

This is an interesting riddle!





Example sentence(s):
  • Q: "Il est où, ton cours?" R:"Dans le pavillon Parent"
David Mousseau
Canada
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: thank you, David


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: a pavillon in France is just a detached house and not too grandiose. but with 00 context and only these 2 words on the page, perhaps it's best to ask the client.
56 mins
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
English-style property/residence


Explanation:
They often call new properties that here in the South of France. I haven't noticed that they are always houses, or bungalows or whatever - in fact I don't know what's English about them, but then it's advertising-speak.

I imagine it would be best to go with something like my suggestion, which is rather general, unless you have other context.

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 01:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: thank you, Sheila


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  B D Finch: Yes, but a "pavillon" is specifically a detached property.
1 day6 hrs
  -> Thanks for the comment - I'm not sure all the local developers are aware of that constraint! Could certainly add "detached"
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