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5 sailing terms

English translation: nautical terms - in harbour

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:terminologie nautique - au port
English translation:nautical terms - in harbour
Entered by: Nikki Scott-Despaigne
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11:17 Apr 3, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime / Sailing
French term or phrase: 5 sailing terms
Translating information for tourist office in Brittany, France, and can't find direct English equivalents for the maritime terms below. The original is not in full sentences, and aims to provide brief practical info for visitors who come into the port by boat. The text in brackets is to aid comprehension:

- port à flot (24-hr access)
- port à seuil
- bassin à flot (draught of 1.5-2m)
- mouillage à chaîne-mère
- port d'échouage, chambre de vases (depth +2.00m)

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated - thanks!
AmandaM
Local time: 04:11
Harbour vocab
Explanation:
http://www.proz.com/?sp=h_a&eid_c=9126&id=175736

- port à flot (24-hr access) = A harbour to which there is always access, whatever the tide is doing. You need to check how much your boat draws - how much of her there is underneath the waterline - before making sure whether you can get in/out safely at a given time though! (Not the same thing as a “floating harbour” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/F/82940.htm)


- port à seuil = harbour/dock with sill.
A “seuil” is a sill in the foundations of a harbour/dock entrance structure. (http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/91744.htm)

- bassin à flot (draught of 1.5-2m) = open basin, wet dock, non-tidal basin, dock basin.
A basin which is closed by a lock. Wet docks always have a more or less the same amount of water in them, whatever the tide is doing. The lock gates are only opened at high tide, which is the only time when boats can enter or leave this dock.
(http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/87745.htm)


- mouillage à chaîne-mère = “Mediterranean mooring, mooring stern-to, mooring bow-to”. (Although your term describes the type of mooring set-up udnerwater, Brits and US refer to it as "Med-mooring".)
A “chaîne-mère » is one of the chains linking the fixed points of a buoy’s mooring to the central point. It’s a set up which enables boats to be moored stern-to or bow-to http://www.sailnet.com/collections/articles/index.cfm?articl... Common in the Med, even referred to as “Mediterranean mooring” by British sailors rather than the more common GB mooring alongside. In fact, it is not just used in the Med. Almost all the boats in my local harbour (La Trinité sur Mer) are moored this way. As marinas become more crowed the technique is used in the UK too. http://www.tor.cc/articles/mooring.htm

For a diagram of what this means underwater, have a look at this : http://perso.wanadoo.fr/portfrejus/amarrage2.htm

You have a long chain (chaîne mere) on the bottom running parallel to a pontoon but at about a boat and a half length’s from the pontoon. From this main chain, several shorter chains (chaîne fille) set at right angles to the pontoon link the main chain to rings fixed onto the pontoon.


- port d'échouage (depth +2.00m) = dry harbour, standing harbour.
A harbour where the boats are left high and dry at low tide. (Avoid using “dry dock” which is “cale sèche” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/69452.htm)

- chambre de vases = Not sure without more description but as it is with “port d’échouage”, I suspect it is either “camber” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/C/91328.htm, (Traditionally a dock where cambering, the bending of beams for shipbuilding, took place. Now used for a small dock) ; or perhaps even “lock chamber” http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/L/92505.htm (The space enclosed between the gates and side-walls of a lock) – but “vases”, being what’s left when the water’s gone, in context?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 15:06:59 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Quick \"Moderator\'s Note\".

Eve if terms are related, it\'s best to post just one term per question. From a practical point of view, someone needing help with similar or identical terms will find the glossary that much easier to use as a result.

Cheers,

Nikki

Co-Moderator FR>EN

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 15:13:32 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In addition to making the glossary easier to use, some folks who can answer one or two of the terms do so, which is helpful. However, others might be dissuaded from doing so if they can\'t answer all.

All the best,

Nikki

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 18:37:13 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Just wondering whether \"Les Vases\" might not be the name for a local beach. La Plage des Vases : www.activart.com/erika/pages/reportage.html

Note on “chambres des Vases”. \"Chambre\" appears to be synonymous locally (Le Croisic) for \"bassin\".
\"Des bassins appelés «chambres» le divisent (la chambre des Vases est réservée aux bateaux de plaisance.\"

Thus \"Les Vases\" bassin is used for cruising boats - ie it\'s the local yacht marina.

http://www.vito-tourisme.com/villes/sitevilles/lecroisic/adv...
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 05:11
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your very thorough definitions, and to everyone else for your assistance.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5Harbour vocab
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 +1floating port - sill port - floating dockDPolice
4 +1Deep water / Dredged etc...zaphod
4link
Vidmantas Stilius
4dry harbourcheungmo


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
floating port - sill port - floating dock


Explanation:
I dont know about the rest


    Dictionary of Naval Technical Vocabulary by G. Hartline
DPolice
Local time: 05:11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
link


Explanation:
I hope this link will help you, at least with sme of the terms:

http://www.cs.stir.ac.uk/~kjt/sailing/eng-fr-af.html

It's an En-Fr Sailing Dictionary


    Reference: http://www.cs.stir.ac.uk/~kjt/sailing/eng-fr-af.html
Vidmantas Stilius
Local time: 06:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in LithuanianLithuanian
Grading comment
Thanks, but I already found it and it lacked detail!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks, but I already found it and it lacked detail!

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Deep water / Dredged etc...


Explanation:
Port a flot: Deep water port
Porte a seuil: Dredged Port
Bassin a Flot: Deep water basin
Mouillage a Chaine-Mere: Chained Mooring (Also called a rafted mooring)
Port D\\\'Echouage: Tidal Port
Chambres des vases: Has me stumped for the moment.


zaphod
Local time: 05:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
11 mins
  -> Merci, still don't know what chambres des vases is though

neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Name for a local beach - Les Vases - and "chambre" used to refer to the yacht marina. See whether you think my post-grading note makes sense. I'm not sure about it!
5 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
dry harbour


Explanation:
For "port d'échouage".

For "chambres des vases", could this be "chambres des vases communiquants"? The equivalent to a hydraulic jack, the sort one finds in a service station?

Re: chaîne mère/fille, there are mooring chains (the boat are tied to them, away from the dock). Could not find a precise equivalent to mère/fille. Perhaps this will give a clue to someone.


cheungmo
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Harbour vocab


Explanation:
http://www.proz.com/?sp=h_a&eid_c=9126&id=175736

- port à flot (24-hr access) = A harbour to which there is always access, whatever the tide is doing. You need to check how much your boat draws - how much of her there is underneath the waterline - before making sure whether you can get in/out safely at a given time though! (Not the same thing as a “floating harbour” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/F/82940.htm)


- port à seuil = harbour/dock with sill.
A “seuil” is a sill in the foundations of a harbour/dock entrance structure. (http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/91744.htm)

- bassin à flot (draught of 1.5-2m) = open basin, wet dock, non-tidal basin, dock basin.
A basin which is closed by a lock. Wet docks always have a more or less the same amount of water in them, whatever the tide is doing. The lock gates are only opened at high tide, which is the only time when boats can enter or leave this dock.
(http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/87745.htm)


- mouillage à chaîne-mère = “Mediterranean mooring, mooring stern-to, mooring bow-to”. (Although your term describes the type of mooring set-up udnerwater, Brits and US refer to it as "Med-mooring".)
A “chaîne-mère » is one of the chains linking the fixed points of a buoy’s mooring to the central point. It’s a set up which enables boats to be moored stern-to or bow-to http://www.sailnet.com/collections/articles/index.cfm?articl... Common in the Med, even referred to as “Mediterranean mooring” by British sailors rather than the more common GB mooring alongside. In fact, it is not just used in the Med. Almost all the boats in my local harbour (La Trinité sur Mer) are moored this way. As marinas become more crowed the technique is used in the UK too. http://www.tor.cc/articles/mooring.htm

For a diagram of what this means underwater, have a look at this : http://perso.wanadoo.fr/portfrejus/amarrage2.htm

You have a long chain (chaîne mere) on the bottom running parallel to a pontoon but at about a boat and a half length’s from the pontoon. From this main chain, several shorter chains (chaîne fille) set at right angles to the pontoon link the main chain to rings fixed onto the pontoon.


- port d'échouage (depth +2.00m) = dry harbour, standing harbour.
A harbour where the boats are left high and dry at low tide. (Avoid using “dry dock” which is “cale sèche” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/D/69452.htm)

- chambre de vases = Not sure without more description but as it is with “port d’échouage”, I suspect it is either “camber” : http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/C/91328.htm, (Traditionally a dock where cambering, the bending of beams for shipbuilding, took place. Now used for a small dock) ; or perhaps even “lock chamber” http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/L/92505.htm (The space enclosed between the gates and side-walls of a lock) – but “vases”, being what’s left when the water’s gone, in context?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 15:06:59 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Quick \"Moderator\'s Note\".

Eve if terms are related, it\'s best to post just one term per question. From a practical point of view, someone needing help with similar or identical terms will find the glossary that much easier to use as a result.

Cheers,

Nikki

Co-Moderator FR>EN

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 15:13:32 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

In addition to making the glossary easier to use, some folks who can answer one or two of the terms do so, which is helpful. However, others might be dissuaded from doing so if they can\'t answer all.

All the best,

Nikki

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 18:37:13 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Just wondering whether \"Les Vases\" might not be the name for a local beach. La Plage des Vases : www.activart.com/erika/pages/reportage.html

Note on “chambres des Vases”. \"Chambre\" appears to be synonymous locally (Le Croisic) for \"bassin\".
\"Des bassins appelés «chambres» le divisent (la chambre des Vases est réservée aux bateaux de plaisance.\"

Thus \"Les Vases\" bassin is used for cruising boats - ie it\'s the local yacht marina.

http://www.vito-tourisme.com/villes/sitevilles/lecroisic/adv...



    Reference: http://www.rchme.gov.uk/
    Reference: http://perso.wanadoo.fr/portfrejus/amarrage2.htm
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 05:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 178
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your very thorough definitions, and to everyone else for your assistance.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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