KudoZ home » French to English » Slang

fusi (spelling?)

English translation: Dang!

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
15:15 Oct 31, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Slang / General public (marketing study-Canadian French)
French term or phrase: fusi (spelling?)
un produit simple; les autres, on ne sait plus ce qu'on mâche avec leur terme fusi

I have some terms in a translation that I am not 100% sure of - I don't normally work with Canadian French.

If my colleagues would be so kind as to help me out...thanks very much! If you think these should be non-pro, I will change the classification.
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 06:52
English translation:Dang!
Explanation:
Quebecers are fond of using swear words as superlatives. Some terms have popped up as more acceptable replacements, and "fusil" is one such term. As such, it has no grammatical meaning in the sentence, and would be used pretty much the same way as one would "Pardi" in France. Consequently, I suggest "Dang" as an equivalent in tone and use.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs (2006-11-01 14:42:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That's a simple product. Dang! The other brands make their product name so complicated we don't know what we're chewing anymore!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs (2006-11-01 14:44:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As in the following Web site: http://www.blogmaverick.com/2006/06/13/dang-its-humid/
Selected response from:

xxxRaynald Adam
Local time: 08:52
Grading comment
This is what fit best in my context and this is what I used - thanks also to Jonathan :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4Dang!xxxRaynald Adam
1 +2two options offered by the site I mentioned above
Jonathan MacKerron
1Could it be a product name?xxxBourth


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
two options offered by the site I mentioned above


Explanation:
"fusil, avoir les yeux en f.
être furieux
to be really pissed off [mad as hell]

fusil, être en f.
être furieux
to be really pissed off [mad as hell]"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2006-10-31 15:52:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

but hardly appropriate for your specific context I'm afraid...

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  IanDhu: "to look daggers" perhaps (from Hamlet)
15 mins

agree  1045: You forgot "en beau fusil" ...
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Could it be a product name?


Explanation:
If I eat ham and eggs, I want to know I'm eating ham and eggs. Put something in a plate and call it "Suprême de la ferme" and I don't know what I'm getting.

If I want to eat the bits of worm-riddled fish they pick off the floor when all the half-decent bits have been dispatched, adding colour and flavouring, I'd like to have that on the packaging, please. Don't call it "Fusi" or something else exotic so I don't know what I'm actually eating.

xxxBourth
Local time: 14:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Dang!


Explanation:
Quebecers are fond of using swear words as superlatives. Some terms have popped up as more acceptable replacements, and "fusil" is one such term. As such, it has no grammatical meaning in the sentence, and would be used pretty much the same way as one would "Pardi" in France. Consequently, I suggest "Dang" as an equivalent in tone and use.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs (2006-11-01 14:42:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That's a simple product. Dang! The other brands make their product name so complicated we don't know what we're chewing anymore!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs (2006-11-01 14:44:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As in the following Web site: http://www.blogmaverick.com/2006/06/13/dang-its-humid/

xxxRaynald Adam
Local time: 08:52
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
This is what fit best in my context and this is what I used - thanks also to Jonathan :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Your explanation is plausible, but the suggested solution is unworkable and ludicrous.[...]//My comment stands, and it was about the idiomacy or otherwise of the English. Actually, it is not unknown for Quebeckers to come to Adelaide, or vice versa.
15 hrs
  -> I'm not sure when was the last time you heard Québécois slang in Australia, but I'll provide a sample translation of the sentence to show how that would work.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search