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tu me fais craquer

English translation: You've hit my soft spot/You've charmed me/You've got under my skin...

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01:30 Jan 12, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Slang
French term or phrase: tu me fais craquer
man who has recently started a relationship with a woman
maria
English translation:You've hit my soft spot/You've charmed me/You've got under my skin...
Explanation:
It means she's got through his defences, "Cracked his armour" so to speak. It's used frequently in several forms: elle est craquante, tu me fais craquer, je craque pour toi.
Selected response from:

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 05:09
Grading comment
Thank you, this really helped me!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3You've hit my soft spot/You've charmed me/You've got under my skin...
Emma Paulay
3 +3you bowled me over
Robin Levey
3I'm falling for you, I'm into youMaya Kruger
5 -3you crack me up
peekay


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -3
you crack me up


Explanation:
quite common

peekay
Canada
Local time: 23:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Katarina Peters
26 mins

disagree  Attorney DC Bar: I believe it means to be bowled over by someone, not to have someone make you laugh, especially in this context.
3 hrs

neutral  1045: "You crack me up." means "You make me laugh." I don't think that that is the case here.
4 hrs

neutral  juliebarba: @ 1045 "you crack me up" can also mean that somebody annoys you, although without further context we don't know.
8 hrs

disagree  Emma Paulay: Not in France!
12 hrs

disagree  Maya Kruger: It doesn't mean to make someone laugh
19 hrs

disagree  Lany Chabot-Laroche: Wrong interpretation
3 days11 hrs
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
you bowled me over


Explanation:
Quite common (at least in the UK, where we understand the intricacies of cricket...).

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 00:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Attorney DC Bar: Also in North America.
3 hrs

agree  Assimina Vavoula
4 hrs

agree  Gacela20
12 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I'm falling for you, I'm into you


Explanation:
It does not mean you just make someone laugh, it's a romantic expression


    users.swing.be/celine.delacharlerie/Fichiers/Girls_BoysTrucsCraquer.htm -
    Reference: http://www.aufeminin.com/mag/couple/d281.html
Maya Kruger
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  writeaway: that would be 'craquer pour" but this isn't the same construction .
6 hrs
  -> sorry, but you are wrong

agree  Emma Paulay: It's the same as "craquer pour"...
11 hrs
  -> merci
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
You've hit my soft spot/You've charmed me/You've got under my skin...


Explanation:
It means she's got through his defences, "Cracked his armour" so to speak. It's used frequently in several forms: elle est craquante, tu me fais craquer, je craque pour toi.

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 05:09
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
Thank you, this really helped me!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxmistahara: Yes, to break down (the armour). "I am taken with you", "I am under your spell"
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mistahara.

agree  Lany Chabot-Laroche
2 days22 hrs

agree  banny: Thank you, Emma
3 days5 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Jan 12, 2008 - Changes made by writeaway:
Field (specific)Poetry & Literature » Slang


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