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ciel de traîne

English translation: tail end of a low, - a low pressure system/zone, - depression

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:ciel de traîne
English translation:tail end of a low, - a low pressure system/zone, - depression
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

12:23 Jul 2, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / meteorology
French term or phrase: ciel de traîne
Thank you all very much

Un *ciel de traîne* s'installe sur la majeure partie du pays.
Rachel Davenport
France
Local time: 17:55
tail end of a low, - a low pressure ystem/zone, - depression
Explanation:
This is a French term for which an English equivalent exists (rear sky) but the English term is never used.

After having worked with meteorologists on a document providing weather routing assistance for a round the world yacht race, and after having consulted many reliable sources over a number of years on this one, notable Ocean Passages of the World, I reached the conclusion that in English we simply quite simply address this one differently altogether.

Whereas in France you can cast your eyes knowledgeably skyward - at the right time of course - and say "hmm, un sacré ciel de traîne", to do so in England and have folks understand what you are talking about, weather men being included in the "folk", I think you will find that "tail end of a depression/low" is what would work.


www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/bluemold/ history/1998/july/980701ha.htm

Regional weather: Wednesday, July 1 - Southern New England - Tail end of a low pressure
system has clouds and showers dominating the weather today…



www.clipper-ventures2.com/raceviewer/ diaries/ViewReport.asp?ReportID=171

This weather was being caused by the tail end of a low pressure system to the west
of us and as we pushed further south west the weather stabilized…


http://www.ckkc.co.uk/html/stories/metrolgy.html

A cold front often accompanies the tail end of a depression causing wind to increase violently and become gusty. An area to avoid by careful planning !.



www.crosswinds.net/~birdtrips/Madeira99.html

members.tripod.com/pedalforpeace/greenbay.htm




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-02 13:09:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"System\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-02 13:12:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The odd thing here being of course that the French term actually describes the state of the sky whereas the English approach in such circumstances is much more oblique, describing what is happeneing to the system itself.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-03 07:17:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A term for term would be nice, but none such usable term exists, accent on usable...No point using a terms which exists technically if never used, in day to day language or by meteorologists.

David\'s solution is probably a practical way around it, but bugs me a little as cloudy skies arise for all sorts of reasons and a \"ciel de traîne\" in very specific circumstances.

Hmm, aiming for a practical solution, with a metronome to time this, howabout :

\"Un ciel de traîne s\'installe sur la majeure partie du pays\"

\"Dull skies almost everywhere following on from the low\".
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 17:55
Grading comment
Yours is the one I think. It reads better in a weather bulletin. More 'understandable' for an everyday reader. Thanks a lot!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1rear sky
1964
4 +2tail end of a low, - a low pressure ystem/zone, - depression
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
3partly cloudyDavid Sirett


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
rear sky


Explanation:
IN online dictionariy it is given as
rear sky

Records de distance
... Portance. Lift. Cible. Target. Poulie. Pulley. Ciel de traine. Rear sky. Précipitation.
Precipitation. Ciel nuageux. Cloudy sky. Précision d'atterrissage. Spot landing. ...
vol.libre.free.fr/lexique.htm - 77k - Önbellek - Benzer sayfalar


Définition :
Nuage assez individualisé qui élève son édifice joufflu sur plusieurs niveaux.


Note(s) :
Non courant.

traîne n. f.
rear sky



1964
Turkey
Local time: 18:55
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in pair: 294
Grading comment
The right 'technical' term, but I don't think it sounds right in a weather bulletin

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Agree that the term exists - and also that it is not used - see my suggestion below.
31 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Meri Buettner: it's the only one I found for this...otherwise you need to describe the whole thing, which is kind've touchy when you're translating a "brief" weather bulletin...
7 hrs
  -> Yes thanks. I always prefer a term for term. long descriptive phrases for a term certainly is not suitable.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: The right 'technical' term, but I don't think it sounds right in a weather bulletin

42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
partly cloudy


Explanation:
I don't think there is an equivalent term for "ciel de traîne" in English, particularly in the register (weather report/forecast) apparently used here.

David Sirett
Local time: 17:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2045
Grading comment
Thanks anyway. Not an easy one.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks anyway. Not an easy one.

44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tail end of a low, - a low pressure ystem/zone, - depression


Explanation:
This is a French term for which an English equivalent exists (rear sky) but the English term is never used.

After having worked with meteorologists on a document providing weather routing assistance for a round the world yacht race, and after having consulted many reliable sources over a number of years on this one, notable Ocean Passages of the World, I reached the conclusion that in English we simply quite simply address this one differently altogether.

Whereas in France you can cast your eyes knowledgeably skyward - at the right time of course - and say "hmm, un sacré ciel de traîne", to do so in England and have folks understand what you are talking about, weather men being included in the "folk", I think you will find that "tail end of a depression/low" is what would work.


www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/bluemold/ history/1998/july/980701ha.htm

Regional weather: Wednesday, July 1 - Southern New England - Tail end of a low pressure
system has clouds and showers dominating the weather today…



www.clipper-ventures2.com/raceviewer/ diaries/ViewReport.asp?ReportID=171

This weather was being caused by the tail end of a low pressure system to the west
of us and as we pushed further south west the weather stabilized…


http://www.ckkc.co.uk/html/stories/metrolgy.html

A cold front often accompanies the tail end of a depression causing wind to increase violently and become gusty. An area to avoid by careful planning !.



www.crosswinds.net/~birdtrips/Madeira99.html

members.tripod.com/pedalforpeace/greenbay.htm




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-02 13:09:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"System\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-02 13:12:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The odd thing here being of course that the French term actually describes the state of the sky whereas the English approach in such circumstances is much more oblique, describing what is happeneing to the system itself.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-03 07:17:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A term for term would be nice, but none such usable term exists, accent on usable...No point using a terms which exists technically if never used, in day to day language or by meteorologists.

David\'s solution is probably a practical way around it, but bugs me a little as cloudy skies arise for all sorts of reasons and a \"ciel de traîne\" in very specific circumstances.

Hmm, aiming for a practical solution, with a metronome to time this, howabout :

\"Un ciel de traîne s\'installe sur la majeure partie du pays\"

\"Dull skies almost everywhere following on from the low\".


Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 17:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4404
Grading comment
Yours is the one I think. It reads better in a weather bulletin. More 'understandable' for an everyday reader. Thanks a lot!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: love that sailor lady
3 hrs

agree  Meri Buettner: Hi Rachel! BUT not sure about this in a brief weather report...it's pretty well the definition.
7 hrs
  -> Perhaps confusing me with someone else? I'm Nikki! Hello to Rachels everywhere anyway
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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