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le roulé d'une épaule

English translation: the roll of a sleeve's head

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:le roulé d'une épaule
English translation:the roll of a sleeve's head
Entered by: Rob Grayson
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10:29 Aug 15, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Textiles / Clothing / Fashion
French term or phrase: le roulé d'une épaule
Found in a description of a range of men's clothing:

"....Les possibilités de personnalisation sont multiples: classique ou contemporain, la longueur la plus juste pour une veste, la plus élégantes des largeurs pour les jambes du pantalon, l'exactitude dans le roulé d'une épaule ou dans le tombé d'une manche...."
Rob Grayson
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:48
the roll of a sleeve's head
Explanation:
This is exactly what they said. However, as CMJ Trans said, you may wish to apply a bit of license since it is advertising copy... :-)

The French school comes from the style begun in the 1960's by Pierre Cardin, who designed a jacket with high shoulders and a visible little roll in the sleeve's head. This jacket is flared and very long, popular in England in the first half of the 20th century. Cardin's pants were bell-bottomed and without pleats.
http://www.sabatinioflondon.net/custom_suits.html

The jacket shoulder is a virtuoso display of tailoring—and the heart of the garment, according to Attolini. Those little puffs in the fabric at the sleevehead are the hallmark of a shirt-sleeve shoulder, so called because the sleeve is attached without using an overlap of fabric. Rather, the Attolini tailors use a lip-stitch to join the fabric ends, then they roll about five centimeters of the fabric into the sleevehead and sew it again. The second stitching produces the slight rippling. It is a difficult technique, and the fact that it's hand-done by different tailors is why no two Attolini jackets are exactly alike. ("Elegance is not perfection," says Massimiliano.)
http://www.departures.com/articles/sew-fine
Selected response from:

Claire Chapman
Local time: 00:48
Grading comment
Thanks, Claire - although I didn't use your exact wording, you helped me to understand what the French was actually describing
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5the roll of a sleeve's head
Claire Chapman
3the perfect fall of the shoulder
Paul Hirsh
3..the precision in the cut of a shoulder..
Cervin
4 -2shoulder padxxxmuitoprazer


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
shoulder pad


Explanation:
the stylistic highlighting of a perfect shoulder curve/form.

xxxmuitoprazer
Local time: 05:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxCMJ_Trans: this is wrong - shoulder pad = épaulette
48 mins

disagree  avsie: Shoulder pad = épaulette
53 mins
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
..the precision in the cut of a shoulder..


Explanation:
..

Cervin
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 44
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the perfect fall of the shoulder


Explanation:
tailors talk about fall meaning the the way the drapery drapes

Paul Hirsh
France
Local time: 06:48
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: I like your suggestion monxmood, but unfortunately the text is immediately followed by "le tombé d'une manche" - i.e. the fall of a sleeve - so probably need to avoid using this twice

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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the roll of a sleeve's head


Explanation:
This is exactly what they said. However, as CMJ Trans said, you may wish to apply a bit of license since it is advertising copy... :-)

The French school comes from the style begun in the 1960's by Pierre Cardin, who designed a jacket with high shoulders and a visible little roll in the sleeve's head. This jacket is flared and very long, popular in England in the first half of the 20th century. Cardin's pants were bell-bottomed and without pleats.
http://www.sabatinioflondon.net/custom_suits.html

The jacket shoulder is a virtuoso display of tailoring—and the heart of the garment, according to Attolini. Those little puffs in the fabric at the sleevehead are the hallmark of a shirt-sleeve shoulder, so called because the sleeve is attached without using an overlap of fabric. Rather, the Attolini tailors use a lip-stitch to join the fabric ends, then they roll about five centimeters of the fabric into the sleevehead and sew it again. The second stitching produces the slight rippling. It is a difficult technique, and the fact that it's hand-done by different tailors is why no two Attolini jackets are exactly alike. ("Elegance is not perfection," says Massimiliano.)
http://www.departures.com/articles/sew-fine

Claire Chapman
Local time: 00:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 331
Grading comment
Thanks, Claire - although I didn't use your exact wording, you helped me to understand what the French was actually describing
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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