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barre rocheuse

English translation: rocky outcrop [see question for fuller discussion]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:barre rocheuse
English translation:rocky outcrop [see question for fuller discussion]
Entered by: Tony M
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23:48 Dec 5, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Tourism & Travel / Outdoors
French term or phrase: barre rocheuse
Context:

Dans une forêt de 15 hectares de pins et de chênes verts, c'est la vraie Provence qui vous accueille avec sa simplicité, son soleil et son ambiance. Situé à mi-distance entre Bollène et Orange, au nord du département, Mornas s'étale au pied d'une abrupte barre rocheuse de 137 mètres. A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées, percées dans les remparts. Plus long que large, le village semble être écrasé au pied de sa barre rocheuse sur laquelle sa forteresse domine encore le Rhône du haut de sa falaise. Ce petit village a su conserver les quelques vestiges de son passé.
Donovan Libring
Local time: 16:35
rocky outcrop
Explanation:
I know this isn't the USUAL translation, but I feel it might fit here, if this is the kind of fortified location I'm picturing...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 16:35
Grading comment
Rocky outcropping... thanks for your help.
Yes, the translation of that website that already translated this information was pretty horrendous. I agree with you guys.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2rocky outcrop
Charlotte Allen
3 +2rocky outcrop
Tony M
3 +1rock wall, wall of rock, etc..xxxBourth


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
rocky outcrop


Explanation:
"Located midway between Bollène and Orange, in the north of the département, Mornas spreads out at the foot of an abrupt rocky outcrop 137 meters high. At each end of the village are two magnificent fortified and crenelated gateways which proudly guard the entrance to the village through the ramparts. Longer than it is wide the village seems to be squashed at the foot of the rocky ridge, from the top of which it's fortress still guards over the River Rhône."


    Reference: http://www.provenceweb.fr/e/vaucluse/mornas/mornas.htm
Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: Hello there Charlotte. That is some pretty terrible English you've found there. Hardly an example to be followed. [...]//It came to Dusty's mind too, without seeing that site it seems. I am not at all suggesting your answer's wrong!
16 mins
  -> Hi Richard! You may be right, but 'rocky outcrop' was what came to my mind, initially and when I saw photos of Mornas, so that part is not so bad! The last paragraph in particular is very bad, though. I'm sure Donovan will make a much better job of it.

agree  Assimina Vavoula
7 hrs
  -> Thanks.
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
rocky outcrop


Explanation:
I know this isn't the USUAL translation, but I feel it might fit here, if this is the kind of fortified location I'm picturing...

Tony M
France
Local time: 16:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 111
Grading comment
Rocky outcropping... thanks for your help.
Yes, the translation of that website that already translated this information was pretty horrendous. I agree with you guys.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlotte Allen: Great minds think alike...
23 mins
  -> Thanks, Charlotte! Simultaneous posting strikes again!

agree  Richard Benham: You've probably got a good point. Charlotte seems to agree with you, and she's even seen a picutre of it.
28 mins
  -> Cheers, RB! I'm always happy to be unanimous with our charming Charlotte
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
rock wall, wall of rock, etc..


Explanation:
barre n.f. [mot gaulois] - 1. Crête rocheuse. Elle correspond souvent à une couche dure dont le pendage est vertical ou presque
[Dict. de géologie, Foucault/Raoult

"Outcrop" will certainly work, but does not necessarily convey the geometry of the feature (need it be conveyed?).

Given the location, I imagine it is one of the vertically sided "mountain tops". Rock wall, wall of rock, escarpment, barren ridge, rock ridge, bare rock ridge, towering slab/mass of rock, table mountain, butte, butte ridge ...

butte. A French term for a conspicuous flat-topped hill with STEEP SIDES and frequently capped by a resistant layer of ROCK. It is CHARACTERISTIC OF ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS and is thought to he a remnant of a partly dissected plateau surface. It is smaller in extent than a --> mesa which is closely resembles in every other way

escarpment (1) the steep slope terminating a plateau or any level upland surface. (2) The steep face which terminates the stratified rocks of a --> cuesta. (3) The term is sometimes used as a synonym of cuesta, but this usage should be discouraged. The term 'scarp' is synonumous with definitions (1) and (2) but not with (3).

cuesta. A Spanish term that has been wixely adopted to decribe an asymmetrical ridge, produced by differential erosion of gently dipping strata, in which the long, gentle slope (-> backslope) is generally accordant with the -> dip of the resistant strata which form the cuesta, while the other slope is shorter and generally steeper (-> escarpment), except in the case of a hog's back ridge, where both backslope and scarp may be of the same gradient ...
[Penguin Dict. of Phys. Geography]

Happy hunting!

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Note added at 10 hrs 18 mins (2004-12-06 10:06:01 GMT)
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Looking for more ideas, I note that the site Charlotte quotes has \"rocky ridge\" for the second occurrence of \"barre rocheuse\".

village seems to be squashed at the foot of the rocky ridge, from the ...
www.provenceweb.fr/e/vaucluse/mornas/mornas.htm

Mornas is a picturesque medieval village, stretched and narrow at the foot of a high cliff
[http://www.beyond.fr/villages/mornas.html]

Excellent picture of cliff at http://www.beyond.fr/villphotos2/mornasP01.html


xxxBourth
Local time: 16:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 67

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Nice work Alex --- authoritative as ever. I still like 'outcrop', but maybe 'steep, rocky ridge' would work better? I can't get Peyrepertuse out of my mind...
5 hrs
  -> Ta. Mostly technical, mostly not poetic, but hopefully will help get (what I imagine to be) the picture.
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