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dépréparation

English translation: disposal

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:dépréparation
English translation:disposal
Entered by: NancyLynn
Options:
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18:46 Jan 5, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / railroad switches
French term or phrase: dépréparation
- Garantir l'application du frein d’immobilisation lors de la dépréparation.
NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 10:44
background notes...
Explanation:
Sorry Nancy, I couldn't find a term that seemed to be 'it'. On the other hand, 'dépréparation' is a genuine term, seemingly narrowly related to trains. The driver is said to 'dépréparer' the train or put it into a state of 'dépréparation', and when he does so these additional brakes (very strong ones) come into play. One of the texts I looked at said that there was a 'dépréparation' button he could press. I got the impression it was a 'state' that the train was put into, say when it is in the station, or when it is not in service for a short while, to make it completely immobile, or to make sure it doesn't move about when passengers are boarding. A rough equivalent would be 'in a state of unreadiness', or 'unready'. One of the texts also referred to 'circuit de préparation' and said that the train could be put into 'dépréparation' either by the driver, or if this circuit was short-circuited.

Sorry, none of this is really of much help to you. What you need is the precise English equivalent.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 22 hrs 44 mins (2005-01-07 17:30:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nancy, I emailed NKW (a ProZ friend of mine and a bit of an expert on trains) and he suggested that \'disposal\' is the term you are searching for.

I will quote from his reply:

\"Touching briefly on railway terminology, I believe that the term you are seeking is \'disposal\', where the driver secures the unit, applies the mechanical parking brake and isolates the external and battery power supplies. Sometimes this is carried out at dedicated Carriage Sidings, sometimes in stations, where units are stabled overnight or during long intervals during the day. I am not sure about the automatic brakes (these are usually electrically- or electropneumatically operated systems .. but the electrical supply is isolated and the compressors are switched out of use. The reservoirs hold sufficient pressure to keep the brakes applied on air-braked stock, whilst the mechanical brake at either end immobilises the unit whilst it is in the carriage sidings/stabled at the platform.



As for the circuit that activates the braking system in the train, both locomotives and multiple-units in France are fitted with an emergency braking system which enables the driver to cut the traction supply and to make an emergency brake application by pressing a red plunger, often situated close to the power/braking controller or on the right hand side of the driving desk. This applies both to SNCF and RATP stock. I believe that newer UK mainline/suburban traction units and LUL underground stock is similarly equipped.



What you describe is more akin to temporary immobilisation of the train, possibly where there is a fault on the permanent way or in the signalling system that requires the train to remain where it is for a considerable period.\"

I have googled for this term myself and it does seem to come up a lot in a \'couplet\' with \'preparation\', e.g. \'Train preparation and disposal\', as if the two were opposites.

Hope this helps. If this term turns out to be the right one, then by rights points should go to NKW....
Selected response from:

Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:44
Grading comment
Thanks Charlotte, that was just great!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4information:xxxCMJ_Trans
3 +1stabling / dispersal
Charlie Bavington
2 +1background notes...
Charlotte Allen
2uncouplingbigedsenior
1depreparationileania


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
depreparation


Explanation:
www.perso.wanadoo.fr/florent.brisou/Fiche%20Nantes.htm
(translate this page)


ileania
Local time: 17:44
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in HungarianHungarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  DocteurPC: is used often, but I don't know if it has the same sense
1 hr
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
uncoupling


Explanation:
a possibility

bigedsenior
Local time: 07:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
stabling / dispersal


Explanation:
According to this site, which I found invaluable when I did some train stuff last summer....

http://www.railway-technical.com/tr-ops.html

Plenty of English language railway sites seem to support "stabling" (which sounds more likely to me than dispersal!)

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 15:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: stabling = mise en garage - stabling is the railway term for "parking". When you stable a train, you must also "unprepare" it, i.e.check you have turned everything off, applied the brakes etc. "Dépréparation" is another form of "preparing" - for parking
4 hrs
  -> Since you are using the car & parking analogy, when I park, I generally tend to check that everything is switched off, brakes are on, etc. :-)

neutral  Charlotte Allen: Hi Charlie, I came across 'stabling' as well, but I get the impression that this is a very general term for putting the train into a siding or whatever, and I think that dépréparation has a more technical, even electrical sense.
4 hrs
  -> Didn't quite get same impression then, cos I saw stabling as being the end of the working day for the train, and they can go into sidings at any time for any reason.....possibly not a key point however :-)

agree  Peter Freckleton: EG "(TDTC1401A) Prepare, operate, monitor and stable steam locomotive" "and see under "Sttable and secure steam locomotive" - http://www.ntis.gov.au/cgi-bin/waxhtml/~ntis2/unit.wxh?page=...
5 hrs
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
information:


Explanation:
before a train can leave a depot and go out on the network, it has to be "prepared" (préparation d'un train). This means that the driver, when he takes up his duty, must carry out a complete series of checks that a specified in the particular rule book of the company for which he works (these are +/- standard internationally but with national "quirks"). These checks include, checking that the brakes are functioning properly, etc. "Preparing a train" also includes turning on the heating on a passenger train so the train will not be stone-cold when the first passengers board. I could go on.... but...
At the end of the "shift", when the train is due to go back to the sheds or to be stabled on a "voie de garage" (stabling track), the process is reversed, in other words the train is "dépréparé". So here they are saying that you must ensure that the brakes are fully applied (parking brakes) when going through the procedures to ensure that the train is properly shut down at the end of its service.
In English you talk about "train preparation" for the first part of the above description. I have never heard of "train depreparation" however - off the top of my head I would say something like "shut down procedures" or "when completing the sign-off process"
HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-01-06 07:15:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

that ARE specified

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 16:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 416
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
background notes...


Explanation:
Sorry Nancy, I couldn't find a term that seemed to be 'it'. On the other hand, 'dépréparation' is a genuine term, seemingly narrowly related to trains. The driver is said to 'dépréparer' the train or put it into a state of 'dépréparation', and when he does so these additional brakes (very strong ones) come into play. One of the texts I looked at said that there was a 'dépréparation' button he could press. I got the impression it was a 'state' that the train was put into, say when it is in the station, or when it is not in service for a short while, to make it completely immobile, or to make sure it doesn't move about when passengers are boarding. A rough equivalent would be 'in a state of unreadiness', or 'unready'. One of the texts also referred to 'circuit de préparation' and said that the train could be put into 'dépréparation' either by the driver, or if this circuit was short-circuited.

Sorry, none of this is really of much help to you. What you need is the precise English equivalent.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 22 hrs 44 mins (2005-01-07 17:30:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nancy, I emailed NKW (a ProZ friend of mine and a bit of an expert on trains) and he suggested that \'disposal\' is the term you are searching for.

I will quote from his reply:

\"Touching briefly on railway terminology, I believe that the term you are seeking is \'disposal\', where the driver secures the unit, applies the mechanical parking brake and isolates the external and battery power supplies. Sometimes this is carried out at dedicated Carriage Sidings, sometimes in stations, where units are stabled overnight or during long intervals during the day. I am not sure about the automatic brakes (these are usually electrically- or electropneumatically operated systems .. but the electrical supply is isolated and the compressors are switched out of use. The reservoirs hold sufficient pressure to keep the brakes applied on air-braked stock, whilst the mechanical brake at either end immobilises the unit whilst it is in the carriage sidings/stabled at the platform.



As for the circuit that activates the braking system in the train, both locomotives and multiple-units in France are fitted with an emergency braking system which enables the driver to cut the traction supply and to make an emergency brake application by pressing a red plunger, often situated close to the power/braking controller or on the right hand side of the driving desk. This applies both to SNCF and RATP stock. I believe that newer UK mainline/suburban traction units and LUL underground stock is similarly equipped.



What you describe is more akin to temporary immobilisation of the train, possibly where there is a fault on the permanent way or in the signalling system that requires the train to remain where it is for a considerable period.\"

I have googled for this term myself and it does seem to come up a lot in a \'couplet\' with \'preparation\', e.g. \'Train preparation and disposal\', as if the two were opposites.

Hope this helps. If this term turns out to be the right one, then by rights points should go to NKW....


    Reference: http://www.equipement.gouv.fr/actualites/Rapports/Rapportlig...
Charlotte Allen
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks Charlotte, that was just great!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Where's NKW (train fanatic turned medical translator) when we need him?
10 hrs
  -> I was going to email him (we're ProZ acquaintances and on emailing terms) but chickened out, then he emailed ME this morning, so I took the opportunity to ask him and he came up with 'disposal'.
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