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Phrasierungszeichen

English translation: Acccent marks

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Phrasierungszeichen
English translation:Acccent marks
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17:54 May 12, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Music theory
German term or phrase: Phrasierungszeichen
This is about music and I wonder if this word can be translated as "phrasing accents".

The specific "accents" are
., -, >, ^

which brings up another question since the explanation to those is "kurzer/langer Fall". Would that be "emphasis" or "instance"?

Kind of embarrasing as I play music myself but it's been a while since I learned the theory....

Thanks for your help,

Antje
Antje Ruppert
United States
Local time: 01:42
Accent marks
Explanation:
As I said on the other instance of this quesiton, "Phasierungszeichen" are "phrasing marks", but these are actually "betonungszeichen", "accent marks". Phrasing is the binding of a number of notes together. Accents are applied to single notes (as are the signs you have given). And crescendo and diminuendo or decrescendo are dynamics, and apply to passages. One of your signs ">" is similar to a diminuendo mark, but that is longer.

I don´t know the correct names for the accent marks you have given (I play Baroque and jazz keyboards, and don´t have to deal with these signs :-), but I know roughly what they mean:

. staccato, or detached
- is an emphasis, held but not long, you could call it a long emphasis
> is a short emphasis
^ is, I think, another short emphasis.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-13 07:08:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have looked further into this, including Trixie´s excellent Dolmetsch reference, and http://www.wm.edu/CAS/music/theorybk/text/sndnot.htm.

The latter explains articulation marks as being of three types: articulation marks (!), phrasing marks, and words. This makes sense for me, in that it admits that these classifications are not absolute. Articulation marks refer to a single note, while phrasing marks refer to groupings of notes. A staccato mark refers to a single note, but affects its relationship to other notes, so it is both an articulation mark and a phrasing mark.

The specifics of the signs do not seem to be as standard as one would wish. Staccato is of course clear. \"-\" is tenuto, its opposite, but sometimes called \"soft attack\". \">\" is sometimes referred to as \"strong attack\", sometimes \"accent\". \"^\" is marcato.

For \"kurzer/langer Fall\", Cécile says it has no real meaning here. As a practical solution I am suggesting \"short/long attack\" (or emphasis, or accent).

Cécile has been commenting of late on a marked difference between English and German. In German, most terms have precise, fixed meanings, where in English they swirl and shift. I thought at first this was a question of perspective, but I am beginning to think she is right.
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:42
Grading comment
Thanks, Chris and everybody else as well.

Regards,

Antje
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Accent marksChris Rowson
5 +1Phrasing marks / phrase marks
Monica Colangelo


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Phrasing marks / phrase marks


Explanation:
http://www.dolmetsch.com/phrase.gif

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-12 19:27:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Diminuendo (decreasingly powerful)
Crescendo (Increasingly powerful)
(für kurzer und langer Fallen)


decrescendo, decresc.
decreasingly powerful

diminuendo. dim.
decreasingly powerful

hairpin signs are also used
narrow to wide for crescendo; wide to narrow for diminuendo

Monica Colangelo
Argentina
Local time: 02:42
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxblomguib
1 hr
  -> Thanks

neutral  Chris Rowson: Phrasierungszeichen are phrasing marks all right, but credc. and decresc. are dynamics, not phrasing. And the samples given are accent marks.
2 hrs
  -> Chris: I based the latter part of my answer on the last two lines I pasted
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Accent marks


Explanation:
As I said on the other instance of this quesiton, "Phasierungszeichen" are "phrasing marks", but these are actually "betonungszeichen", "accent marks". Phrasing is the binding of a number of notes together. Accents are applied to single notes (as are the signs you have given). And crescendo and diminuendo or decrescendo are dynamics, and apply to passages. One of your signs ">" is similar to a diminuendo mark, but that is longer.

I don´t know the correct names for the accent marks you have given (I play Baroque and jazz keyboards, and don´t have to deal with these signs :-), but I know roughly what they mean:

. staccato, or detached
- is an emphasis, held but not long, you could call it a long emphasis
> is a short emphasis
^ is, I think, another short emphasis.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-13 07:08:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have looked further into this, including Trixie´s excellent Dolmetsch reference, and http://www.wm.edu/CAS/music/theorybk/text/sndnot.htm.

The latter explains articulation marks as being of three types: articulation marks (!), phrasing marks, and words. This makes sense for me, in that it admits that these classifications are not absolute. Articulation marks refer to a single note, while phrasing marks refer to groupings of notes. A staccato mark refers to a single note, but affects its relationship to other notes, so it is both an articulation mark and a phrasing mark.

The specifics of the signs do not seem to be as standard as one would wish. Staccato is of course clear. \"-\" is tenuto, its opposite, but sometimes called \"soft attack\". \">\" is sometimes referred to as \"strong attack\", sometimes \"accent\". \"^\" is marcato.

For \"kurzer/langer Fall\", Cécile says it has no real meaning here. As a practical solution I am suggesting \"short/long attack\" (or emphasis, or accent).

Cécile has been commenting of late on a marked difference between English and German. In German, most terms have precise, fixed meanings, where in English they swirl and shift. I thought at first this was a question of perspective, but I am beginning to think she is right.


    Reference: http://www.candcmusic.de
Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 768
Grading comment
Thanks, Chris and everybody else as well.

Regards,

Antje

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан
7 hrs

agree  Steve McFarlane
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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