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Mummenschanz

English translation: farce / charade / pantomime

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Mummenschanz
English translation:farce / charade / pantomime
Entered by: William Stein
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:18 Apr 4, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: Mummenschanz
Masquerade? Is there a better word? Sounds a bit old-fashioned in the context I need it in.

Context: A rather Kafkaesque scene in a play. A man is dragging a church bell after him, and addressing the audience. He is explaining that he didn’t know what he was getting himself
into when he accepted this job -- well, maybe he didn’t exactly get the job, he was forced to take the job … but at any rate … he says

Ich habe mir diesen Mummenschanz jedenfalls nicht ausgedacht. Das müssen Sie mir glauben.
Gunilla Zedigh
Germany
Local time: 16:27
farce
Explanation:
or
Punch-and-Judy show
or
pantomime

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Note added at 2003-04-05 01:44:21 (GMT)
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Charade is another option (the third meaning would be particularly suitable here):

Main Entry: cha·rade
Pronunciation: sh&-\'rAd, -\'räd
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from Provençal charrado chat, from charrá to chat, chatter
Date: 1776
1 : a word represented in riddling verse or by picture, tableau, or dramatic action
2 plural : a game in which some of the players try to guess a word or phrase from the actions of another player who may not speak
3 : an empty or deceptive act or pretense <his concern was a charade>
Selected response from:

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 08:27
Grading comment
thanks for all the info guys!
think charade is best here too... gz
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7farce
William Stein
5 +2mascarade
Saskia
4low-brow comedyNancy Arrowsmith
4theatre of the absurdgangels
4guise, disguiseezbounty@aol.co
4 -1Mummenschanz
swisstell


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
farce


Explanation:
or
Punch-and-Judy show
or
pantomime

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-04-05 01:44:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Charade is another option (the third meaning would be particularly suitable here):

Main Entry: cha·rade
Pronunciation: sh&-\'rAd, -\'räd
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from Provençal charrado chat, from charrá to chat, chatter
Date: 1776
1 : a word represented in riddling verse or by picture, tableau, or dramatic action
2 plural : a game in which some of the players try to guess a word or phrase from the actions of another player who may not speak
3 : an empty or deceptive act or pretense <his concern was a charade>


William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1734
Grading comment
thanks for all the info guys!
think charade is best here too... gz

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxSilLiz
1 hr

agree  Fantutti
5 hrs

agree  TonyTK
6 hrs

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
7 hrs

agree  virgotra
8 hrs

agree  pschmitt
19 hrs

agree  gangels: charade is what I thought of first
1 day3 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
mascarade


Explanation:
dress-up, costume

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Note added at 2003-04-04 16:29:45 (GMT)
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here the event itself is meant

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Note added at 2003-04-04 16:30:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

masquerade better spelling ;)

Saskia
Local time: 09:27
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 179

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
34 mins

agree  swisstell: except those many t hat have also seen Mummenschanz in the USA
38 mins
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Mummenschanz


Explanation:
I would not translate it. The name was made famous by the Mummenschanzgroup of Basle, Switzerland. If you look up Google, there are thousands of hits in various languages - always leaving the word as is.

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Note added at 2003-04-04 17:44:19 (GMT)
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Mummenschanz of course is not just a local i.e. Swiss thing as people of little cultural exposure might imply (see neutral below).
The Mummenschanz group has toured the world many times and was part of the world-famous Circe de Soleil for a year.

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 16:27
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3377

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kim Metzger: Google hits are worthless without additional resources. No one in an English-speaking country would have a clue what Mummenschanz means.
31 mins
  -> the comment above belongs here. Obviously, your bureaucratic reliance on "references" will not do in such cases

neutral  Nancy Arrowsmith: right on Kim
7 hrs

disagree  virgotra: Kim, you're spot on again
8 hrs
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
guise, disguise


Explanation:
pretense

ezbounty@aol.co
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 287
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
low-brow comedy


Explanation:
(I guess that's what we're talking about?)
otherwise, if the context demands it, farce or nonsense are also OK.

Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 474
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1 day3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
theatre of the absurd


Explanation:
is an old standby of theater critics

gangels
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 5465
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