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Fahrtwind

English translation: headwind/aerodynamic drag

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Fahrtwind
English translation:headwind/aerodynamic drag
Entered by: bhpirch
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12:09 Jun 4, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / automotive
German term or phrase: Fahrtwind
Does anybody have a good translation of "Fahrtwind" (the wind created while driving a car)?
Thank you for all your help
bhpirch
Local time: 07:07
airstream, apparent wind (but see detail)
Explanation:
A couple of dictionaries (including the Oxfored/Duden) give 'arstream' or 'airflow', but I don't think these are adequate. The 'Fahrtwind' is the wind experienced by a vehicle (or a person in a vehicle) as a result of the motion of the vehicle. As far as I know there is not exact equivalent term in English, where it is more common to speak of the effects of this 'wind' (aerodynamic drag, wind resistance etc.)

Depending on your context, you might use 'apparent wind' (but this is the combination of any 'true' wind and the 'own wind' of the moving vehicle) or 'airstream (moving past the vehicle)', but it might be better to use a paraphrase or reword the translation to avoid the use of the term (e.g. use 'aerodyamic drag' in place of 'Widerstand verursacht durch den Fahrtwind').

Headwind is arguably OK in a vernacular context, but technically it means an external wind blowing opposite the direction of travel, not the apparent wind due to the motion of the vehicle (opposite of tail wind).

one example reference:

Have you ever wondered how the wind affects the performance of a Derby racer? You may have seen some interesting results on a gusty race day, when a big ''sled'' somehow beat the ''sure winner''. Let's examine mathematically how this works.

Once a Derby racer gets up to speed it's estimated that aerodynamic drag accounts for over 80% of the total drag an the car. So, as cars approach the finish line, it is common to see the more aerodynamic cars seem to pull away. Since air drag is a highly nonlinear function of apparent wind velocity, and since a Derby has a larger lateral area than frontal area, it appears that there are aerodynamic effects that work to increase the drag forces of crosswinds and even "quartering'' tailwinds. This article describes calculations for the, effects.

The results are interesting:

* The most beneficial wind is not a direct tailwind but a ''quartering'' tailwind of about 30 degrees from the rear.
* The most detrimental wind is not a direct headwind, but rather a ''quartering'' headwind blowing at about 45 degrees to the racer's path.
* Crosswinds are not harmless. A pure crosswind (at 90 degrees to the direction of travel) actually slows a racer down almost as much as a direct headwind.
* ''Marginal'' tailwinds (i.e. winds Making an angle of about 100 degrees to 140 degrees to the direction of the racer) can be either beneficial or detrimental depending on there speed, the speed of the racer, and the design of the racer.

Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 14:07
Grading comment
The explanations helped the best and gave a clearer picture of what is meant. Thank you so much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3head wind
Steffen Walter
5 +2slipstreammckinnc
4 +1air strea, relative wind, or slip stream
Dr. Fred Thomson
4airstream, apparent wind (but see detail)Ken Cox


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
head wind


Explanation:
is the term springing to my mind in this case

Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 274

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cilian O'Tuama: or as one word "headwind"
3 mins
  -> Ja, beide Schreibweisen

agree  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.
6 mins
  -> Danke Rolf

agree  Jeannie Graham: also air stream and slip stream
24 mins
  -> Thanks, but to avoid the ambiguity apparently created by your BMW glossary I'd still prefer the safe bet of "head wind"
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
slipstream


Explanation:
Is that not all it is? This is often referred to when talking about the wind turbulence behind a plane for example.

mckinnc
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: that's be Windschatten, i.e. behind the car. Headwind is what blows back your hair.
1 min

neutral  Steffen Walter: in line with Cilian
5 mins

agree  Jeannie Graham: possibility as per bmw glossary
21 mins

agree  xxxbrute
42 mins
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
air strea, relative wind, or slip stream


Explanation:
These are translations provided by Whylidall,GE Autmotive Engr Dict


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 13:03:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Headwind is the wind that the vehicle meets as it travels. It is not the wind created by the vehicle.
Oops, I meant to type \"air stream\" above.
You might consider vehicle turbulence or vehicle-caused turbulence.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 06:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 159

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: yes, 'realative wind' is also good (but it still depends on the context)
8 mins
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
airstream, apparent wind (but see detail)


Explanation:
A couple of dictionaries (including the Oxfored/Duden) give 'arstream' or 'airflow', but I don't think these are adequate. The 'Fahrtwind' is the wind experienced by a vehicle (or a person in a vehicle) as a result of the motion of the vehicle. As far as I know there is not exact equivalent term in English, where it is more common to speak of the effects of this 'wind' (aerodynamic drag, wind resistance etc.)

Depending on your context, you might use 'apparent wind' (but this is the combination of any 'true' wind and the 'own wind' of the moving vehicle) or 'airstream (moving past the vehicle)', but it might be better to use a paraphrase or reword the translation to avoid the use of the term (e.g. use 'aerodyamic drag' in place of 'Widerstand verursacht durch den Fahrtwind').

Headwind is arguably OK in a vernacular context, but technically it means an external wind blowing opposite the direction of travel, not the apparent wind due to the motion of the vehicle (opposite of tail wind).

one example reference:

Have you ever wondered how the wind affects the performance of a Derby racer? You may have seen some interesting results on a gusty race day, when a big ''sled'' somehow beat the ''sure winner''. Let's examine mathematically how this works.

Once a Derby racer gets up to speed it's estimated that aerodynamic drag accounts for over 80% of the total drag an the car. So, as cars approach the finish line, it is common to see the more aerodynamic cars seem to pull away. Since air drag is a highly nonlinear function of apparent wind velocity, and since a Derby has a larger lateral area than frontal area, it appears that there are aerodynamic effects that work to increase the drag forces of crosswinds and even "quartering'' tailwinds. This article describes calculations for the, effects.

The results are interesting:

* The most beneficial wind is not a direct tailwind but a ''quartering'' tailwind of about 30 degrees from the rear.
* The most detrimental wind is not a direct headwind, but rather a ''quartering'' headwind blowing at about 45 degrees to the racer's path.
* Crosswinds are not harmless. A pure crosswind (at 90 degrees to the direction of travel) actually slows a racer down almost as much as a direct headwind.
* ''Marginal'' tailwinds (i.e. winds Making an angle of about 100 degrees to 140 degrees to the direction of the racer) can be either beneficial or detrimental depending on there speed, the speed of the racer, and the design of the racer.




    Reference: http://207.242.75.40/derbtech/windeff.htm
Ken Cox
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 251
Grading comment
The explanations helped the best and gave a clearer picture of what is meant. Thank you so much.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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