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grobstollig

English translation: deep-treaded / extra-chunky / heavy-tread

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:grobstollig
English translation:deep-treaded / extra-chunky / heavy-tread
Entered by: Ulrike Kraemer
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

08:44 Mar 11, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks
German term or phrase: grobstollig
Maschinen von XXX sind mit großen, grobstolligen Rädern ausgestattet (for use on muddy ground).

The machines are fitted with large wheels, but what about the "grobstollig" bit? I found tread pattern, profile, lugs, etc. but am not an expert on tyres. Help is therefore much appreciated.

TVMIA
Ulrike Kraemer
Germany
Local time: 18:33
deep-treaded, knobby
Explanation:
Here's another option, if you're still not satisfied. But I can also totally concur with the knobby/knobblies suggestions -- e.g. knobbly (more common is “knobby”) tires or studded tires for winter cycling. I translate for a motorcycle manufacturer and that's what "we" call the tires with the high-profile/deep-tread.
I've noted in my glossary that:
"Stollenräder or Stollenreifen are off-road tyres, or knobbly tyres, commonly referred to as "knobblies" (motorcycle term)"



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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-03-11 12:45:22 GMT)
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Not to worry- your entry was clear to me that you weren't talking about motorcycle tires (or for your readership tyres), but the suggestions still are valid -- a tire is a tyre and no matter its size it can have a deep, knobbly tread. HTH, BJ
Selected response from:

DespinaB
Austria
Local time: 18:33
Grading comment
Well, I would have liked to give points to all of you for the many good suggestions. After doing some "legwork" (as suggested by Richard), I decided to go with "deep-treaded". I'll include "extra-chunky" and "heavy-tread" in the glossary, however, because I think they're good alternatives. Thanks a lot for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1chunky Tread)David Moore
5knobby
Richard Stephen
4knobbly (tyres)DHPete
4deep-treaded, knobby
DespinaB


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
chunky Tread)


Explanation:
I think this is the expression I'd use; I had such a term recently, and I found out that these agricultural tyres with rubber studs are not sold in the UK, only in Scandinavia - at least by Michelin. So they ain't no "regular" English term for them.

I think you'd get the meaning acoross admirably if you described them as "agricultural (or tractor) tyres) with an extra- chunky tread", bearing in mind that tractor tyres in the UK have a pretty deep tread anyway..

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Note added at 20 mins (2008-03-11 09:05:00 GMT)
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That should have been "chunky (tread)"...sorry!

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Note added at 22 mins (2008-03-11 09:06:19 GMT)
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Hell fire - "across" should have been in there too...too early in the morning for me....

David Moore
Local time: 18:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 572

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter: I've also come across "knobby tread". Not sure if this would really be appropriate to describe the tread of giant tractor tyres. See http://www.woodsequipment.com/mowerdetail.aspx?id=9643 ("Choice of Turf, low-pressure Chevron, or Knobby tread tires").
36 mins
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
knobby


Explanation:
In the US we do use snow tires for cars and we call them "knobbies"
See also references

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-11 10:02:42 GMT)
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I don't think the term is limited to cars. I know for a fact that the term is also used for motorcycles. There are all sorts of Google hits under snow tires. So let's let the asker do the "leg work" himself.


    Reference: http://www.safety-council.org/info/traffic/snowtires.html
    Reference: http://www.tirerack.com/winter/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=125
Richard Stephen
United States
Local time: 10:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 408

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Moore: ...and for tractors? Which is what these are if I read correctly between the lines...
16 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
deep-treaded, knobby


Explanation:
Here's another option, if you're still not satisfied. But I can also totally concur with the knobby/knobblies suggestions -- e.g. knobbly (more common is “knobby”) tires or studded tires for winter cycling. I translate for a motorcycle manufacturer and that's what "we" call the tires with the high-profile/deep-tread.
I've noted in my glossary that:
"Stollenräder or Stollenreifen are off-road tyres, or knobbly tyres, commonly referred to as "knobblies" (motorcycle term)"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2008-03-11 12:45:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Not to worry- your entry was clear to me that you weren't talking about motorcycle tires (or for your readership tyres), but the suggestions still are valid -- a tire is a tyre and no matter its size it can have a deep, knobbly tread. HTH, BJ

DespinaB
Austria
Local time: 18:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Well, I would have liked to give points to all of you for the many good suggestions. After doing some "legwork" (as suggested by Richard), I decided to go with "deep-treaded". I'll include "extra-chunky" and "heavy-tread" in the glossary, however, because I think they're good alternatives. Thanks a lot for your help.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
knobbly (tyres)


Explanation:
Only marginally different from Stephen's suggestion, but this is certainly a (colloquial) term in the UK

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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-03-11 12:49:05 GMT)
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In response to your last note: in that case I'd probably simply call them "heavy-tread tyres"

DHPete
Local time: 17:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 78
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