ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » German to English » Bus/Financial

EURO or EUROS

English translation: U.S. audience: euro (pl. euros), EUR, €

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Euro (pl. Euro)
English translation:U.S. audience: euro (pl. euros), EUR, €
Entered by: Erik Macki
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:17 Apr 23, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: EURO or EUROS
In non-legislative and non-legal texts (e.g. advertising, press releases of companies, newspaper articles mentioning figures etc.) - what is the best way to indicate EURO amounts? I'm particularly interested in the US audience's usage since that's the target group I'm translating for.
The EU originally intended the Euro to be "invariable" but I know that in the UK it's most common to write "10 million Euros" rather than "10 million Euro" - do the Americans feel the same way?
Barbara Wiegel
United States
Local time: 01:51
e.g. 18 EUR, 18 euros, or €18
Explanation:
For a U.S. audience, I think either of the following three notations are both defensible and commonplace in the translating I do (over 900,000 words last year):

18 EUR
18 euros
€18

Which you select depends on consistency with other currencies. For instance, if you write $12, then you should write €12. If you write 12 dollars, you should write 12 euros. If you write 12 USD or $12 USD, then you should write 12 EUR or €12 EUR, correspondingly.

I see reason to avoid the euro symbol (€). Everyone pretty much knows what it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-23 18:51:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I had a typo: I see *no* reason to avoid the euro symbol (€). Go ahead and use it!
Selected response from:

Erik Macki
Local time: 22:51
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5euros
Ted Wozniak
5 +3e.g. 18 EUR, 18 euros, or €18Erik Macki
5abbreviations + words + symbolsJoy Christensen
4 -1Euros
NickWatson
4 -3ONE AMERICAN'S EXPERIENCExxxRNolder
1no definite answer, just more background info
Dan McCrosky


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
ONE AMERICAN'S EXPERIENCE


Explanation:
IN MY LINE OF WORK, I OFTEN PLACE EU AFTER A NUMBER (EG. 10,8 EU). hOWEVER WHEN REFERING TO IT IN CORRESPONDENCE I WILL SAY: 10.8 EUROS SO THAT ALL THE RECIPIENTS WILL HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING (NOT JUST THOSE WITH ACCOUNTING BACKGROUNDS)

xxxRNolder
Local time: 01:51
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 163

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Erik Macki: In this case it's better to use the standard three-letter abbreviation, e.g. 10.80 EUR
18 mins
  -> WAS A TYPO ! BUT IN CORRESPONDENCE

disagree  AmiHH: EUR should go BEFORE the figure, in an American context.
51 mins
  -> WELL, LIKE I SAID IN THE INDUSTRY I WORK FOR IT IS PLACED AFTER THE AMOUNT AS EUR (BEFORE WAS A TYPO - SHOOT ME!) AND IN CORRESPONDENCE, SENTENCES ETC. IT IS SPELLED OUT IN THE PLURAL AS EUROS.

disagree  Joy Christensen: I have seen just a plain E, but EU is no go; that means something else. But wouldn't you say 10.80 EUR or euros or whatever? Why on earth leave the zero off? Of course, talking about millions or billions, you'd do it this way, but not smaller than that.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
euros


Explanation:
Although the "official" plurals are euro and eurocent, since your not writing for the EU, don't let them legislate grammar! The English plural is formed by adding an s. Basta! Ende! Finito!

In the end, it's the client's decision what they prefer. I have clients who insist on the "official" ungrammatical plural and others who insist on the the s-ending.

Ted Wozniak
United States
Local time: 00:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1846

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elvira Stoianov
7 mins

agree  Erik Macki
21 mins

agree  jccantrell: yep, sheep:sheep, ox:oxen, goose:geese ..
1 hr

agree  Joy Christensen: and fish fish; but English has a tradition of putting an "s" on the end of units of money. I don't think English can be regulated in Brussels either!
4 hrs

agree  Jan Liebelt
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Euros


Explanation:
I am inclined to write Euro with a capital E to begin with. I debated this issue with my Dad ( a former head of English) and he said it does not need a capital. It is nevertheless frequently written with a capital E.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-23 18:47:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You can also make life easier by inserting the Euro symbol instead...€. Just an idea

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-23 20:32:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Evidently the Euro currency is the exception to the rule in terms of capitalisation, here is just one of the myriad of examples
\"Hyperwave AG secured new equity totaling Euro 20 million due to good growth forecasts and an established business model\", it is also frequently the case in English that the currency is written before the figure



NickWatson
Germany
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Erik Macki: Just as one does not capitalize dollar, mark, franc, or ruble, so does one not capitalize euro.
2 mins

neutral  Pee Eff: agree with Erik
1 hr

disagree  Ralf Lemster: Even though you see it frequently, that doesn't mean it's correct... ;-)
1 hr
  -> well it is certainly the case that the currency should come before the figure, and as we all know conventions can over time become grammatical rules

neutral  Joy Christensen: I believe the E is meant to stand in for the symbol.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
e.g. 18 EUR, 18 euros, or €18


Explanation:
For a U.S. audience, I think either of the following three notations are both defensible and commonplace in the translating I do (over 900,000 words last year):

18 EUR
18 euros
€18

Which you select depends on consistency with other currencies. For instance, if you write $12, then you should write €12. If you write 12 dollars, you should write 12 euros. If you write 12 USD or $12 USD, then you should write 12 EUR or €12 EUR, correspondingly.

I see reason to avoid the euro symbol (€). Everyone pretty much knows what it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-23 18:51:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I had a typo: I see *no* reason to avoid the euro symbol (€). Go ahead and use it!


    ATA-accredited
Erik Macki
Local time: 22:51
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 384

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  deireland: This just about covers it.
26 mins

agree  ZOLTÁN PARRAGH
1 hr

agree  StefanR
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
no definite answer, just more background info


Explanation:
Bundesfinanzministerium: http://www.bundesfinanzministerium.de/Anlage1761/Bericht-des...

Für die gemeinsame europäische Währung wurde von der Internationalen Organisation für Standardisierung (ISO) der aus drei Buchstaben bestehende Code „EUR“ festgelegt (ISO 4217, Nr. 94). Auch das graphische Symbol € für den Euro wurde dort registriert. Es ähnelt einem E, das von deutlich markierten, horizontal parallel verlaufenden Linien durchquert wird. Für die Untereinheit des Euro hat sich bislang keine Abkürzung oder Symbol durchgesetzt. Ihre offizielle Bezeichnung lautet „Cent“. Bei der Bildung der Mehrzahl wird auf das Plural-S verzichtet („zwei Euro, drei Cent“).


Duden Neue Deutsche Rechtschreibung:

der Euro – [s] – [s]

but Rule 90 is mentioned, which says roughly "no plural endings on currency names that are not feminine" ... but then what about "die Pfennige" ???

der Pfennig –s –e

die Mark – –

Duden only mentions "Cent" as an English word, but writes:

der Cent – [s] – [s] as with "der Euro"


Official European Union site: http://europa.eu.int/comm/translation/euro/eurofull.htm

German: Euro
Note "Euro" ist invariabel, also Singular "der Euro", Plural "die Euro":
1 Euro/100 Euro - der Euro/die Euro; ISO-Code: EUR

English: euro
Note one euro, two euro; ISO code: EUR


About.com: http://german.about.com/library/bleuro_voc.htm

euro (noun) = der Euro (no plural ending)
one euro has 100 cents = ein Euro hat 100 Cent
five euros = fünf Euro

cent (noun) = der Cent (no plural ending)
In German the plurals of "Cent" and "Euro" are the same as the singular.
This is the case for many money units in German that are not feminine.


The Financial Times and Wall Street Journal both write:
"one euro" and "two euros" – "one cent" and "two cents"
(but wsj writes "European cents").



Landesbank Kiel:
http://www.lb-kiel.de/de/ipr/reports/Euroewu/EuroSpezial_200...

Der Euro
€ = Symbol
EUR = amtliches Kürzel
Singular = 1 Euro
Plural = 100 Euro
Der Cent = Untereinheit des Euro;
100 Cent = 1 Euro
Ct. = kein amtliches, aber gebräuchliches Kürzel für Cent


Luxemburg: http://www.abbl.lu/euro99_d/monnaie.htm

Euro, EURO oder Euros: welches ist die richtige Schreibweise ?

Bei der Beantwortung dieser denn doch nicht unwesentlichen Frage, lehnt man sich an die bei andern Währungsbezeichnungen übliche Schreibweise an.

Da es sich beim Euro – im Gegensatz zum ECU oder zur DM und nicht um eine Abkürzung aneinandergereihter Wörter handelt, gibt es keinen Grund zur Schreibweise in Großbuchstaben. Also: Euro, nicht EURO. Was die Mehrzahl-Bezeichnung anbelangt, die ja wohl am häufigsten Verwendung findet, wird nach der zwar nicht absoluten, aber gängigen Regel verfahren werden, dass Währungsbezeichnungen im Plural ungebeugt bleiben. Genauso wie man von 100 Dollar spricht, wird man von 100 Euro (und nicht 100 Euros) sprechen.

Bei der Zentimalunterteilung in Cent dürfte dieselbe Regel gelten, wenngleich bei Fremdbezeichnungen – aber handelt es sich hier um eine solche ? – die Beugung nicht ungebräuchlich ist. Also Cent oder Cents ? Die Rechtschreibexperten haben sich für "Cent" und die "Cent" entschieden.
Im Französischen bekommt der (kleingeschriebene) "euro" seine Pluralendung, also – "20 euros" – "un montant en euros". Für die Unterteilung in Cent haben sich die Franzosen eine ganz besondere Lösung einfallen lassen: Da ihnen das etwas amerikanisch klingende "cent" nicht so leicht über die Lippen kommt, haben sie eigenmächtig beschlossen, daß auch die Bezeichnung "centimes" verwendet werden darf.


Österreich: http://www.euro.gv.at/download/eurobuch.pdf

Als Untereinheit des Euro wurde der Cent erkoren. 100 Cent sind ein Euro. „Cent“ ist die rechtlich festgelegte Bezeichnung; zwar befindet sich auf den Münzen der Aufdruck „Euro Cent“, das ist aber eine Ausnahmeregelung – „Euro Cent“ ist keine formal richtige Bezeichnung. Weder Euro noch Cent werden übrigens als Mehrzahlwort verwendet – auch im Plural heißt es „Euro“ und „Cent“, nicht etwa „Euros“ und „Cents“.

Personally, I am fed up with all this. In English, I now always write one euro and two euros, one (euro) cent and two (euro) cents. I only insert the "(euro)" in front of cent or cents if cents from other currencies are mentioned in the same context.

HTH

Dan





Dan McCrosky
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
abbreviations + words + symbols


Explanation:
When currency is abbreviated it is capitalized, and BEFORE the sum it should be abbreviated. Like DM 20 or 20 marks (English). So if the euro is abbreviated to EUR, it is capitalized. The E, I believe, is a compromise when one lacks the symbol, and it only resembles the symbol when it is a capital E. Similarly, it's $20 or 20 dollars (dollar sign is on about all keyboards). In Denmark it's DKK 20 or 20 kr or 20 kroner. By the way, what does one say to the plural of the word "krone" in English? I hope not "kroners".

Joy Christensen
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Erik Macki: In English you should use krone/kroner or crown/crowns (Danish crowns). If kroner is somehow unbearable to an editor, then crowns is the way to go.
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: