KudoZ home » German to English » Bus/Financial

Dipl.-Oekonom

English translation: MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", "M.Sc. Econ.", or "(similar to master's degree in economics)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Dipl. Oekon.
English translation:MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", "M.Sc. Econ.", or "(similar to master's degree in economics)
Entered by: danilingua
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

09:41 Jul 8, 2002
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: Dipl.-Oekonom
Titel eines MAnagers

graduate in economics?
danilingua
Germany
Local time: 23:02
"MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", "M.Sc. Econ.", or "(similar to master's degree in economics)"
Explanation:
My first reaction was to automatically agree with Sabine without any research. Andy is well known for his good answers though, so I thought I'd better have a look. Google search results indicate the matter is very complicated:

"Master of Economics" site:.edu

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=...

199 hits, including Georgetown, Princeton, Columbia, Cornell, and NYU

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economics" site:.uk

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

47 hits, not including any big-name universities

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economy" site:.edu

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

5 hits, including no major universities

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economy" site:.uk

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

7 hits, also including no major universities

-----------------------------------------

After the above searches, I asked myself where were Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, and Yale.

1. Harvard and Yale apparently do not offer master's programs in economics, only undergraduate programs and a doctorate programs. When they speak of the programs though, they use the term "economics" and not "economy".

http://post.economics.harvard.edu/program/

http://post.economics.harvard.edu/undergraduate/

http://www.econ.yale.edu/graduate/grad.html#Description of P...

http://www.econ.yale.edu/~miller/ugrad.htm

2. Oxford offers an "M.Sc. course in economics for development" degree (M.Sc. Dev.Econ.), an "M.Phil. course in economic and social history" degree (M.Phil. Econ.Hist.), and an "M.Phil. course in Economics" degree (M.Phil. Econ.).

http://www.econ.ox.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate/MSc/msc_informatio...

http://www.econ.ox.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate/MPhil/mphil_inform...

http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/currentgrad/courses/index.htm

3. Cambridge offers several M.Phil. courses in Economics.

http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/prospect/mphil/course.htm


This leaves you with a couple of problems. Firstly, if you don't know where in the English-speaking world your translation will be read, you don't know whether to use the abbreviation "MA" for US consumption or "M.Phil." or "M.Sc" abbreviations for British consumption. (As far as I know, Economics degrees in the US are always "Arts" = "MA" degrees and not "Science" = "MS" degrees.) Secondly, if your readership will be British, you probably don't know whether your economist would be more the arty-party variety (M.Phil.) or the nuts-and-bolts variety (M.Sc.).

Because of all these uncertainties, I would prefer to use the German term followed by this long explanatory form in English

"(similar to master's degree in economics)"

and then let the reader worry about what sort of master's degree it might be.

Your German text is an abbreviation however, so you probably don't have a choice and will be forced to decide between "MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", or "M.Sc. Econ.".

By the way, "master's degree" beats "masters degree" by 600,000 to 100,000 at Google.

HTH

Dan


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:14:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:39:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:39:56 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:54:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:56:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is not me who keeps submitting the above note. Ask Henry. We\'ll see how many times this one is repeated.

NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English defines economics as \"the branch of knowledge concerned with the production, consumption and transfer of wealth\".

Merriam-Webster\'s Collegiate® Dictionary more or less agrees by saying economics is \"a social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services\".

Studying these fields, students try to earn \"Dipl.-Oekonom\", \"MA (Econ.)\", \"M.Phil. Econ.\", or \"M.Sc. Econ.\" degrees, as well as the following doctor\'s degrees.

By studying Business Management (leading to BS Bus. Admin/Man. and MBA degrees, similar to BWL, leading to Diplom Kaufman degrees, as well as the following doctor\'s degrees), students try to learn how to apply the principles of economics, political science, mathematics, psychology, and sociology, among other fields of learning, to the everyday running of different types of businesses.

Business Management tends to be SOMEWHAT more practical and Economics more theoretical. That is part of the old, original reason why, in the US, Business Management degrees are often \"BS\" or \"MS\" degrees and Economics degrees are generally \"BA\" or \"MA\" degrees.
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 23:02
Grading comment
thank you. I chose it because of the very extensive and helpful explanation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1Master/ (Bachelor - less likely) in Economics
Сергей Лузан
4 +1Master of Economics, MEcon
Translations4IT
4 +1Master of Economy
Andy Lemminger
1 +1"MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", "M.Sc. Econ.", or "(similar to master's degree in economics)"Dan McCrosky


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Master of Economy


Explanation:
Some will argue that "Master" is not the same as "Diplom". Nevertheless it is the most similar degree. If you want to be precise just leave "Diplom Ökonom" as is and add "Master of Economy" in brackets

Andy Lemminger
Canada
Local time: 15:02
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 1127

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Piotr Kurek
1 min

neutral  Kim Metzger: economics
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Master of Economics, MEcon


Explanation:
Deutsches Universalwörterbuch

Translations4IT
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 730

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar
21 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Master/ (Bachelor - less likely) in Economics


Explanation:
Good luck from Ph D in Economics, danilingua!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-13 06:04:48 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Research below was nice. Thanx Dan McCrosky, I read it with pleasure and interest.

Сергей Лузан
Russian Federation
Local time: 00:02
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 420

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels
2 hrs
  -> Thanx a lot from Ph D. Vielen Dank vom promovierten Doktor.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", "M.Sc. Econ.", or "(similar to master's degree in economics)"


Explanation:
My first reaction was to automatically agree with Sabine without any research. Andy is well known for his good answers though, so I thought I'd better have a look. Google search results indicate the matter is very complicated:

"Master of Economics" site:.edu

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=...

199 hits, including Georgetown, Princeton, Columbia, Cornell, and NYU

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economics" site:.uk

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

47 hits, not including any big-name universities

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economy" site:.edu

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

5 hits, including no major universities

-----------------------------------------

"Master of Economy" site:.uk

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

7 hits, also including no major universities

-----------------------------------------

After the above searches, I asked myself where were Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, and Yale.

1. Harvard and Yale apparently do not offer master's programs in economics, only undergraduate programs and a doctorate programs. When they speak of the programs though, they use the term "economics" and not "economy".

http://post.economics.harvard.edu/program/

http://post.economics.harvard.edu/undergraduate/

http://www.econ.yale.edu/graduate/grad.html#Description of P...

http://www.econ.yale.edu/~miller/ugrad.htm

2. Oxford offers an "M.Sc. course in economics for development" degree (M.Sc. Dev.Econ.), an "M.Phil. course in economic and social history" degree (M.Phil. Econ.Hist.), and an "M.Phil. course in Economics" degree (M.Phil. Econ.).

http://www.econ.ox.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate/MSc/msc_informatio...

http://www.econ.ox.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate/MPhil/mphil_inform...

http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/currentgrad/courses/index.htm

3. Cambridge offers several M.Phil. courses in Economics.

http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/prospect/mphil/course.htm


This leaves you with a couple of problems. Firstly, if you don't know where in the English-speaking world your translation will be read, you don't know whether to use the abbreviation "MA" for US consumption or "M.Phil." or "M.Sc" abbreviations for British consumption. (As far as I know, Economics degrees in the US are always "Arts" = "MA" degrees and not "Science" = "MS" degrees.) Secondly, if your readership will be British, you probably don't know whether your economist would be more the arty-party variety (M.Phil.) or the nuts-and-bolts variety (M.Sc.).

Because of all these uncertainties, I would prefer to use the German term followed by this long explanatory form in English

"(similar to master's degree in economics)"

and then let the reader worry about what sort of master's degree it might be.

Your German text is an abbreviation however, so you probably don't have a choice and will be forced to decide between "MA (Econ.)", "M.Phil. Econ.", or "M.Sc. Econ.".

By the way, "master's degree" beats "masters degree" by 600,000 to 100,000 at Google.

HTH

Dan


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:14:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:39:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:39:56 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:54:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If possible with the German term first followed by the expression \"similar to MBA\" or whatever, I often use the mathematics symbol for \"nearly equal to\" or \"similar to\" that usually won\'t print here at ProZ, but you know, the wavy equals sign: ¡Ö

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 12:56:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is not me who keeps submitting the above note. Ask Henry. We\'ll see how many times this one is repeated.

NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English defines economics as \"the branch of knowledge concerned with the production, consumption and transfer of wealth\".

Merriam-Webster\'s Collegiate® Dictionary more or less agrees by saying economics is \"a social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services\".

Studying these fields, students try to earn \"Dipl.-Oekonom\", \"MA (Econ.)\", \"M.Phil. Econ.\", or \"M.Sc. Econ.\" degrees, as well as the following doctor\'s degrees.

By studying Business Management (leading to BS Bus. Admin/Man. and MBA degrees, similar to BWL, leading to Diplom Kaufman degrees, as well as the following doctor\'s degrees), students try to learn how to apply the principles of economics, political science, mathematics, psychology, and sociology, among other fields of learning, to the everyday running of different types of businesses.

Business Management tends to be SOMEWHAT more practical and Economics more theoretical. That is part of the old, original reason why, in the US, Business Management degrees are often \"BS\" or \"MS\" degrees and Economics degrees are generally \"BA\" or \"MA\" degrees.


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 23:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
thank you. I chose it because of the very extensive and helpful explanation.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  stefana
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search