KudoZ home » German to English » Business/Commerce (general)

Unternehmer

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
12:23 Feb 2, 2009
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
German term or phrase: Unternehmer
"Als Vertragspartner der XXX AG und eigenständiger *Unternehmer* ist er verantwortlich für die positive Entwicklung seines Unternehmens in Balance mit den Interessen der XXX AG"

Am I the only person who thinks that "entrepreneur" is rarely a satisfactory translation of "Unternehmer"? To me an entrepreneur is generally someone who looks to invest in suitable business ventures, whereas an "Unternehmer" is frequently (as here) simply the owner/operator of an independent business enterprise.

Any good ideas/suggestions welcome.
DHPete
Local time: 11:47
Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +8entrepreuner or business owner
SusieZ
4 +2independent contractor
Robinshaw
4employer or industrialist (but also entrepreneur)Ellen Kraus
4undertakingDavid Moore
4contractor/independent contractor
Inge Meinzer
3"business entity" or "trading entity"
Jo Bennett
3sole proprietor
Lingua.Franca
2 -1businessman
Helen Shiner


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
businessman


Explanation:
A small squeak - would this do?

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Notes to answerer
Asker: A little too general for the context, but thanks


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Charles Rothwell: A tad too general, I fear (except in gender terms!)
30 mins
  -> Possibly - hence the small squeak.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
employer or industrialist (but also entrepreneur)


Explanation:
would be my suggestion

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 Min. (2009-02-02 12:28:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

but if you need the term in plural, you are better advised to use < the business community >

Ellen Kraus
Austria
Local time: 12:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 84

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  SusieZ: do we know that the owner has employees or is large enough to be an "industrialist"?
27 mins
  -> as long as this question has not been answered, it is thus premature to distribute

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: maybe CL4 is premature too?
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
entrepreuner or business owner


Explanation:
In the US at least, a self-employed business owner is an entrepreneur. When it comes time to pay taxes, the business owner typically declares that all of his assets are at risk - sounds pretty entrepreneurial to me:))....But, you can of course use "business owner" instead.

SusieZ
United States
Local time: 06:47
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alison Schwitzgebel
5 mins

agree  Mark Straver: I'd definitely go for this one.
31 mins

agree  Kevin Fulton: or "business operator"
46 mins

agree  Friderike Butler
55 mins

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
1 hr

agree  Nick van Boshoven
2 hrs

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: fits this context well - the owner part being important. :)
2 hrs

agree  Rebecca Garber
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sole proprietor


Explanation:
In this context entrepreneur doesn't fit well.

Entwicklung seines Unternehmens --> "his enterprise" would work here.

Lingua.Franca
Spain
Local time: 12:47
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  SusieZ: a "sole proprietor" is simply a business owner who has not incorporated his business. Nothing in the text calls for that kind of interpretation.
24 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
eigenständiger Unternehmer
independent contractor


Explanation:
since the context makes reference to a contractual relationship

Robinshaw
Spain
Local time: 11:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Inge Meinzer: I did not see your entry before I posted mine :-)
21 mins
  -> Null problemo, Inge ...

agree  Charles Rothwell: I agree. Could even be 'franchisee' (if we had more context)?
24 mins
  -> I agree

disagree  Mark Straver: You can be an independent contractor without having a contract, though. And be one without being a business owner as well which the term seems to indicate (as well as the context).
30 mins

agree  Alfredo Vargas: Definitely, in this specific context
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
contractor/independent contractor


Explanation:
Often used in the US for the owner of a small service business. IMO this would be quite appropriate in the context at hand.

Inge Meinzer
United States
Local time: 03:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
undertaking


Explanation:
This is the expression contained in the acronym "SMU", and I think it's perfectly suitable here as "independent undertaking".

SMU = small and medium-sized undertakings

David Moore
Local time: 12:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 237

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ken Cox: this won't work in the US, where an undertaking is a project or a formal (contractual) commitment\\The asker is UK-based, but we don't know the target audience.
1 hr
  -> Yes, Ken, that's quite true, but as it's a contract being translated by a UK-based translator, I'd bet it's a pretty (UK-)restricted audience...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"business entity" or "trading entity"


Explanation:
Either of these would cover sole props, partnerships, ltd companies or any other format. You can find plenty of hits for both via Google, eg Wikipedia link below for "business entity".


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_business_entity
Jo Bennett
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer




Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (3): writeaway, EdithK, Susan Welsh


Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Feb 2, 2009 - Changes made by Susan Welsh:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search