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Stahlbetondecke

English translation: reinforced concrete slab (floor/ceiling slab)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Stahlbetondecke
English translation:reinforced concrete slab (floor/ceiling slab)
Entered by: Victor Dewsbery
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

20:05 Feb 19, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering
German term or phrase: Stahlbetondecke
Description of the roof of a new building:-

Dach: Leicht geneigt, vollflächig verschalt, Holzunterkonstruktion auf einer Stahlbetondecke.

I can't picture this. It's not a reinforced conrete ceiling, is it? Or is it?
Armorel Young
Local time: 07:20
reinforced concrete slab (floor/ceiling slab)
Explanation:
This context doesn't seem to focus on either the ceiling or the floor.
Usually you have to plump for one or the other -- the word "Decke" in construction is a blanket term, and in English you have to decide what is meant in the context (or combine them as "floor/ceiling").
Makes a translator's life interesting. (Keeps you off the streets, doesn't it?).
Here, though, I think it's enough to call it just a "slab".
The Penguin Dictionary of Building defines ceiling as "The visible upper surface of a room ...". That doesn't seem to be meant here.

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Note added at 48 mins (2005-02-19 20:53:43 GMT)
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I suggest the ceiling is the **underside** of the slab. You can suspend things from the ceiling (lamps, for example). But if you build something on top of the slab, you are not focussing on the underside. So Armorel was right to doubt the dictionarese solution \"ceiling\".
The same principle applies whatever the external roofing is made of -- tiles, roofing felt, even a sloping concrete roof.
The top surface of the slab in question is not the ceiling, nor is it really the floor. That\'s why I would just call it a slab.
Selected response from:

Victor Dewsbery
Germany
Local time: 08:20
Grading comment
Thanks for the lively discussion, everyone. I'm going to use this phrase as probably the "least misleading".
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1reinforced concrete floorFox76
4 +1I think it is...almost.
Richard Benham
2 +2reinforced concrete slab (floor/ceiling slab)
Victor Dewsbery


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
reinforced concrete floor


Explanation:
In addition to Victor:
In this case, there are
1. a reinforced concrete floor/slab (horizontal)= Decke
2. a wooden roof framing arranged to give a slight slope = Holzunterkonstruktion
3. a wooden boarding of the roof = vollflächig verschalt
4. covering with ....?? tiles, shingles or whatsoever

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Note added at 38 mins (2005-02-19 20:43:39 GMT)
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According to asker\'s note to Richard:
3. wooden boarding
4. insulation layer made of tar board
5. tiles

Fox76
Local time: 08:20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Häh? Where does it mention the floor?//We are told specifically that this is about the roof--and since when are floors deliberately built on a slope??
3 mins
  -> Betondecke : seen from below = ceiling, seen from above = floor

agree  Rolf Bueskens: Would also go with floor; slab tends to imply that it is on the ground.
1 hr
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
reinforced concrete slab (floor/ceiling slab)


Explanation:
This context doesn't seem to focus on either the ceiling or the floor.
Usually you have to plump for one or the other -- the word "Decke" in construction is a blanket term, and in English you have to decide what is meant in the context (or combine them as "floor/ceiling").
Makes a translator's life interesting. (Keeps you off the streets, doesn't it?).
Here, though, I think it's enough to call it just a "slab".
The Penguin Dictionary of Building defines ceiling as "The visible upper surface of a room ...". That doesn't seem to be meant here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2005-02-19 20:53:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I suggest the ceiling is the **underside** of the slab. You can suspend things from the ceiling (lamps, for example). But if you build something on top of the slab, you are not focussing on the underside. So Armorel was right to doubt the dictionarese solution \"ceiling\".
The same principle applies whatever the external roofing is made of -- tiles, roofing felt, even a sloping concrete roof.
The top surface of the slab in question is not the ceiling, nor is it really the floor. That\'s why I would just call it a slab.

Victor Dewsbery
Germany
Local time: 08:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 180
Grading comment
Thanks for the lively discussion, everyone. I'm going to use this phrase as probably the "least misleading".

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: The "Dach:" suggests this whole passage is a description of the roof (plus ceiling).... It's almost certainly a reinforced concrete slab, but hardly one you'd walk on if you were inside the house??
3 mins
  -> You might walk or crawl on it if you go into the attic. Otherwise: see my note.

agree  Ken Cox: to make life easier in English, you could use 'ceiling slab' (roof... on r.c. ceiling slab...' should be clear enough)
1 hr

agree  Caroline Bentley: slab is fine - it is a structural element and can be on the ground or supported by columns, it can be a ceiling or a floor or both.
14 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I think it is...almost.


Explanation:
But the "auf" is a bit confusing. I'm pretty sure the reinforced concrete is the topmost layer.

SOme more of the description might make it clearer.

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Note added at 9 mins (2005-02-19 20:15:32 GMT)
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Well, it is possible that the wood is just there for aesthetic effect and/or a bit of sound/heat insulation.... I don\'t think it would make muchsense the other way around.

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Note added at 38 mins (2005-02-19 20:43:39 GMT)
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Two more questions, Armorel. Is there a picture (of the inside particularly)? Are these houses built for Germans primarily?

BTW, I con\'t see any reason why you couldn\'t just pluk the tiles on the sloping reinforced concrete slab. I am pretty sure that the \"verschalt\" refers to a wooden lining, of the sort our German friends seem so fond.

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Note added at 53 mins (2005-02-19 20:59:25 GMT)
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I think the suggestions that a floor is being referred to should be saved for April 1. (It\'s not so far off, lads!)

Essentially, I don\'t think there\'s anything wrong with translating the whole thing literally, avoiding the word \"ceiling\", of course, in favour of \"slab\".

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Note added at 1 hr 50 mins (2005-02-19 21:56:08 GMT)
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Now that the further information that there are tiles is to hand, it is quite possible that things are more or less as Victor describes in his comment below. That is, there is a concrete slab over the top (which forms the ceiling of the house and the floor of absolutely nothing) with a few slopy bits of wood holding up some tiles, which are lined with tarry stuff, allegedly for insulation. The underside of this reinforced concrete slab would be lined with whatever....

All in all, I think Kenneth\'s suggestion of \"ceiling slab\" is quite a reasonable compromise.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 08:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Victor Dewsbery: The wood is the rafter and batten structure which supports the tiles. And it is built on top of the "Decke". You try building that sort of structure **on top of** a ceiling. You'd probably have to turn the house upside down first.
16 mins
  -> Who says there are any tiles? It says the roof is "verschalt", i.e. lined. With what? Maybe the wood? And wooden you rather put the lining in later...?

agree  Andrew D: the wood will be lining the side of the roof. On top of the concrete slab you will have the wooden construction to give the right angle, or if the slab is angeled to hook the tiles into, here we have a Konterlattung/Lattung above the bitumen insulation.
15 hrs
  -> This is my general idea: so there will actually be wood above and below the reinforced concrete.
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