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Gebäck

English translation: (you choice of/variety of) bread

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18:46 Apr 6, 2008
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
German term or phrase: Gebäck
.... Salad served with ... dressing and "Gebaeck".

I am struggeling to find an appropriate term for Gebaeck, as in a veriety of bread rolls.
All I could find was "pastries" which in my optinion is something different... ?
Austrianlassie
Local time: 09:06
English translation:(you choice of/variety of) bread
Explanation:
Das kann dann "rolls, bagels, a slice of bread etc." sein. Das Wort Gebäck im Deutschen bezieht sich eindeutig auf Brot, Semmeln (Brötchen) usw. und nicht auf Kuchen, Torten (pastries) usw.
Selected response from:

Andrea Winzer
United States
Local time: 04:06
Grading comment
Thanks everybody, I have opted for "variety of bread rolls" in the end.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2bakery items, baked goods
Brigitte Keen-Matthaei
3 +2(you choice of/variety of) bread
Andrea Winzer
3 -1scone
Sladjana


  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Gebaeck
(you choice of/variety of) bread


Explanation:
Das kann dann "rolls, bagels, a slice of bread etc." sein. Das Wort Gebäck im Deutschen bezieht sich eindeutig auf Brot, Semmeln (Brötchen) usw. und nicht auf Kuchen, Torten (pastries) usw.

Andrea Winzer
United States
Local time: 04:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thanks everybody, I have opted for "variety of bread rolls" in the end.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Andrea. That's what I was going to use, but I'm looking for a shorter version if possible (mainly to save space on the menu card).


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mihaela Boteva: Just bread would be OK -- normally you get whatever the place is offering.
41 mins

agree  Cetacea: bread or possibly even bread sticks.
1 hr

agree  Anja Neudert: just bread is fine - you don't know whether there will be a *choice*
12 hrs

disagree  Vere Barzilai: Gebäck could be some sweet pastry as well and bread, in my opinion, is just bread
19 hrs
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Gebaeck
scone


Explanation:
scone sticks, perhaps?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scone_(bread)

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Note added at 22 mins (2008-04-06 19:09:42 GMT)
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or scone rolls.

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Note added at 51 mins (2008-04-06 19:38:02 GMT)
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A wrong link about the term scone appears. I copied it again.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scone_(bread)

Here is the full text version copied fro Wikipedia:

Scone (bread)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Scones with honey. Jam is also a favoured topping.
Scones are also commonly served with jam and clotted cream (commonly known as a cream tea).The scone is a British snack of Scottish origin. A small quickbread made of wheat, barley or oatmeal, usually with baking powder as a leavening agent. British scones are often lightly sweetened, but may also be savoury. In the U.S., scones are drier and larger, and typically sweet.

The pronunciation across the United Kingdom is varied. Some sections of the population (nearly two thirds of the British population and 99% of the Scottish population, according to one academic study[1]) pronounce it as /skɒn/ (to rhyme with con and John, the U English Pronunciation), and the rest pronounce it /skəʊn/ (to rhyme with cone and Joan, the Non-U English pronunciation). According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word scone derives perhaps from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread). The word is attested in the Scots language long before it was in more general use in the English language.

[edit] Description
British scones closely resemble a North American biscuit (many recipes are actually identical) — itself not to be confused with the English biscuit, which equates to the American cookie. In the United States, there is a growing tendency to refer to sweet variations as "scones" (perhaps under influence from espresso bars, where they are popular fare), while those eaten as part of savoury meals are known as "biscuits". American "scones" are often baked to a dry and somewhat crumbly texture, and are typically large and rectangular; more like a cross between a cookie and a muffin than a biscuit. In Canada, both tend to be called "biscuits" or "tea biscuits".


[edit] Varieties
British scones frequently include raisins, currants, cheese or dates. In the United States, scones sold by coffee shops often include fillings such as cranberries, blueberries, nuts, or even chocolate chips. More original fillings include smarties. However, most fillings tend to be spices, including cinnamon and poppy. In both Britain and the U.S., mass-produced scones tend to be doughier than home-made scones.

In Scotland and Ulster, savoury varieties of scone include soda scones, also known as soda farls, and potato scones, normally known as tattie scones, which resemble small, thin savoury pancakes made with potato flour and resemble the Jewish latke. Potato scones are most commonly served fried in a full Scottish breakfast or an Ulster fry.


[edit] Scones around the world
The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea.

The griddle scone is a variety of scone which is fried rather than baked. In some countries one may also encounter savoury varieties of scone which may contain or be topped with combinations of cheese, onion, bacon etc.

In the Scots language, a griddle is referred to as a "girdle". Therefore "griddle scones" are known as "girdle scones". This usage is also common in New Zealand where scones, of all varieties, form an important part of the traditional cuisine.

Scones are popular in Ireland as well as England and Scotland, and were chosen as the Republic of Ireland representative for Café Europe during the Austrian Presidency of the European Union in 2006 (the United Kingdom chose shortbread).

Other common terms include dropped scone, or drop scone, after the method of dropping the batter onto the griddle or frying pan to cook it.

In some US states in the Mountain West region, especially Utah and Idaho, a "scone" commonly refers to a deep fried flattened bread which serves as the basis for "Navajo" tacos and is commonly consumed by itself with honey butter. It is similar to frybread or sopaipilla.

Scones are quite popular in Argentina (brought by Irish and English immigrants and from Welsh immigrants in Patagonia [2]). They are usually accompanied by tea, coffee or mate. [3]

In Australia, popular varieties include the vegemite scone.

[edit] Other usage
In Scottish language the verb scon means to crush flat or beat with the open hand on a flat surface, and "scon-cap" or "scone-cap" refers to a man's broad flat cap or "bunnet".





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Note added at 53 mins (2008-04-06 19:39:50 GMT)
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http://www.joyofbaking.com/SconesIntroduction.html

Sladjana
Montenegro
Local time: 10:06
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Craig Meulen: A British reader would be shocked, he would never eat a scone with a salad.
1 hr
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
bakery items, baked goods


Explanation:
This is what jumped to mind

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Note added at 57 mins (2008-04-06 19:44:08 GMT)
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You don't want to narrow your choice to one specific term, since who knows what sort of bread, muffin, bread sticks, rolls, croissants is meant. It could be a scone, of course, but could be something entirely different as well - you don't know. (I don't think scones are served with a salad...)

Brigitte Keen-Matthaei
Local time: 00:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ingeborg Gowans: this is a good way of "covering all your angles and convey the meaning at the same time
28 mins

neutral  Craig Meulen: On a menu? I'm not sure, doesn't sound too appetising. In another context, fine.
40 mins

neutral  Cetacea: Basically correct, but I don't think you'd see either "bakery items" or "baked goods" on a menu.
41 mins

agree  Vere Barzilai: would have definitely gone with pastry or baked goods
19 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (1): VeronikaNeuhold
Non-PRO (3): Harald Moelzer (medical-translator), Cetacea, writeaway


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Changes made by editors
Apr 6, 2008 - Changes made by writeaway:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO
Apr 6, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Term askedGebaeck » Gebäck


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