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Promotion zum Dr. jur.

English translation: Awarded doctorate in law (Dr.jur.)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Promotion zum Dr. jur.
English translation:Awarded doctorate in law (Dr.jur.)
Entered by: Kim Metzger
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15:30 Apr 5, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Education / Pedagogy / CV
German term or phrase: Promotion zum Dr. jur.
From a speaker's CV. Promotion is a doctorate or PhD, but what would be the natural way to express this in a CV? The "Thema" is the title of his thesis (British English).

1990 - Promotion zum Dr. jur. über das Thema:
“Die extraterritoriale Anwendung nationalen Wettbewerbsrechts unter besonderer Berücksichtigung länderübergreifender Fusionen“
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 21:18
Awarded doctorate in law (Dr.jur.)
Explanation:
I am not concerned about points here. I just wanted more room to express my views.

I think the possible confusion over the exact equivalent in English is good enough reason to stick to the German title. In British universities (and those of many other Commonwealth countries), the LLD is a "higher doctorate", very rarely awarded, for scholars of international reputation (as with LittD, DSc, sometimes MD (quite unlike the US MD!), etc.). So the nearest "equivalent" to a German Dr.jur. would be a PhD in law. But then you could argue that name is not synonymous as it doesn't mention law, could get confused with the German Dr.phil. (which is similar to a PhD, but only in humanities/arts/social science disciplines...) etc.

So why not keep it, with an explanation in English of what it is, but in lower case so as not to look like an "official title" of the degree?
Selected response from:

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 04:18
Grading comment
Thanks, everybody. I think this is a good entry for our KOG.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Awarded doctorate in law (Dr.jur.)
Richard Benham
4 +1Awarded LLD
Textklick
3 +2received, awarded
jccantrell


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
received, awarded


Explanation:
How I might phrase it.

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 33

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: I am not sure a verb is necessary, as this is a CV in point form. If so, however, I would use "awarded"....technically "admitted to the degree of..." is probably more accurate, but too pompous for a CV.
2 mins

agree  Textklick: I didn't refresh the browser as usual. With you on the pompous.
9 mins
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Awarded LLD


Explanation:
Oxford English Reference Dictionary: LL D abbr.
Doctor of Laws. L legum doctor

"Awarded Dr. Jur. (LLD) for my dissertation: "....etc.

Guess that's what I'd say in a C.V. Don't envy you the rest really.

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Note added at 28 mins (2007-04-05 15:59:13 GMT)
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Yes of course Richard's right. Awarded doctorate in law (Dr. jur.)...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-04-05 17:00:29 GMT)
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Tübingen? In that case, I'd go for what I last said above as Richard suggested. It's not the EN title or EN equivalent - it's an explanation.

Textklick
Local time: 03:18
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mill2: or just simply 1990 - Doctorate of Laws etc. [in AE it would be Doctorate in Law]
12 mins

neutral  Richard Benham: Trouble is, LLD is a "higher doctorate" [...] This guy may only have a JD, by the sounds of it....//There is a research paper requirement for JD (see link above), but it now seems this is a red herring!
35 mins
  -> Bloody dictionaries. You might be right, but according to Wikipedia, a JD is based on the number of hours you clocked up. It was awarded in the US (see Wikipedia :Doctor of laws) and he did write a dissertation.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Awarded doctorate in law (Dr.jur.)


Explanation:
I am not concerned about points here. I just wanted more room to express my views.

I think the possible confusion over the exact equivalent in English is good enough reason to stick to the German title. In British universities (and those of many other Commonwealth countries), the LLD is a "higher doctorate", very rarely awarded, for scholars of international reputation (as with LittD, DSc, sometimes MD (quite unlike the US MD!), etc.). So the nearest "equivalent" to a German Dr.jur. would be a PhD in law. But then you could argue that name is not synonymous as it doesn't mention law, could get confused with the German Dr.phil. (which is similar to a PhD, but only in humanities/arts/social science disciplines...) etc.

So why not keep it, with an explanation in English of what it is, but in lower case so as not to look like an "official title" of the degree?

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 04:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Thanks, everybody. I think this is a good entry for our KOG.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bernhard Sulzer: an example: 1992 Doctorate in law, awarded by the Freiburg Law Faculty. http://www.uclm.es/Espaciojudicialeuropeo/curriculum/vogel.p...
3 hrs

agree  Julia Weiss
15 hrs

agree  Textklick: Please excuse me for editing a peer comment. Not cricket! I meant to say that what I said above was an agree with Richard!
6 days
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Changes made by editors
Apr 5, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldSocial Sciences » Law/Patents


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