KudoZ home » German to English » Education / Pedagogy

Diplom-Übersetzer

English translation: Master's Degree in Translation

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Diplom-Übersetzer
English translation:Master's Degree in Translation
Entered by: Ruth Wiedekind
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

09:43 Jul 31, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy
German term or phrase: Diplom-Übersetzer
just out of interest:

does Diplom-Übersetzer correspond to a "master degree" or to a "post-graduate degree" in translation? official homologization? UK, USA, other countries?
Ruth Wiedekind
Germany
Local time: 21:01
Graduate Degree in Translation / Master's Degree in Translation
Explanation:
This is a bit complicated. My title, for example, is "staatlich geprüfte Übersetzerin" - which translates to "state-certified" / "state-examined" translator. So "certified" doesn't necessarily express the "Diplom" part. Generally, a German "Diplom" is equivalent to a master's degree (both in the UK and the US)

http://www.daad.or.th/StudyinGermany/RegularCourses.asp
http://www.internationaledu.net/english/germany2.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 16 mins (2004-07-31 12:00:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Uni-Diplom = Master\'s degree:
http://www.mm-translations.com/qualifications.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 17 mins (2004-07-31 12:00:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Uni-Diplom = Master\'s degree:
http://www.mm-translations.com/qualifications.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 49 mins (2004-07-31 12:32:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The point of the question, as I perceive it, is not in which country the person has received his or her degree, but if the term \"Diplom-Übersetzer\" *corresponds* to a master\'s degree\" -- and the answer to that is yes.
Selected response from:

AnnikaLight
Germany
Local time: 21:01
Grading comment
I am only giving you 2 points because the others gave very good information, too.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +5FH=BAHons, Uni=MasterVampyre
4 +1Graduate Degree in Translation / Master's Degree in Translation
AnnikaLight
3 +1Postgraduate degree-qualified translator/Diplom-Übersetzer
Dr Andrew Read
3qualified / graduate translatorHeidi Zapf
4 -1Qualified Translator
Arianna Tremayne
1 +1certified translator
Jonathan MacKerron


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Diplom-Übersetzer
qualified / graduate translator


Explanation:
.....habe ich er"googled". Siehe z.B. Link unten


    Reference: http://www.omnilingua.com/resource/localindustry/translator....
Heidi Zapf
Local time: 21:01
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Aniello Scognamiglio: certified no, graduate yes - "Diplom" (master) is a university degree (can be Hochschule or Fachhochschule)!
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Diplom-Übersetzer
Qualified Translator


Explanation:
In UK universities you get bachelors degrees or masters degrees for languages, but that does not imply that you are then a qualified translator. The ITI does exams, and gives you a 'Diploma in Translation' after passing the exam.

Arianna Tremayne
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:01
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  AnnikaLight: Arianna, in Germany, the "Diplom" is a university degree. I don't think the German "Diplom" is equivalent to the British "diploma". Diploma courses can be short courses (and not necessarily university courses), I think. Do you agree?// Ah, ok.Thanks :-)
5 mins
  -> Yes, Annika, I totally agree. Was just an explanatory comment for more information.

disagree  Aniello Scognamiglio: "Diplom" (master) is a university degree (can be Hochschule or Fachhochschule)!
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Diplom-Übersetzer
certified translator


Explanation:
according to Dietl/Lorenz

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2004-07-31 09:49:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

doesn\'t necessarily imply a postgradute degree

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 37 mins (2004-07-31 12:21:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the point the disagreers are missing, is that Germany has no graduate level as such, even though the BA is now offered at several universities. Master\'s/Graduate Degree in Translation would imply that the person in question received his/her degree outside of Germany.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 39 mins (2004-07-31 12:23:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"degree in translation\" might be closest to the truth

Jonathan MacKerron
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 165

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Siegfried Armbruster
32 mins
  -> thx

agree  Wenjer Leuschel
1 hr
  -> thx

agree  Vampyre: in allen Diplom Übersetzer CVs und Homepages die ich gelesen habe wurde es mit "certified translator" übersetzt
1 hr
  -> thx

disagree  AnnikaLight: Sorry. What I meant to say is this: "certified" is too vague and is therefore (as I believe) not equivalent with a "Diplom-Übersetzer".
2 hrs
  -> do you mean vague? if so a simple neutral would have sufficed

disagree  Aniello Scognamiglio: "Diplom" (master) is a university degree (can be Hochschule or Fachhochschule)! // certified translator is not correct at all, this alone justifies my disagree, please read my other comments.
2 hrs
  -> but not necessarily a postgraduate one, here again you needn't have disagreed...

agree  gangels: the meaning is obvious,' certificate' is just as vague as 'Diplom'
3 hrs
  -> thx

neutral  Sabine Griebler: I wouldn't use certified. ProZ translators can be certified by their professional associations, but Diplom is a university degree. I think it shouldn't be translated.
4 hrs
  -> but these associations also issue a Diplom, you are overtranslating

disagree  Dr Andrew Read: This sounds too weak - they could have just taken a short three-week course to be "certified" or have one of those mail-order diplomas!
5 hrs
  -> see above
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Diplom-Übersetzer
FH=BAHons, Uni=Master


Explanation:
Probably its more accurate to distinguish between a "Diplom Übersetzer FH" and a "Diplom Übersetzer" from a German university, comparing the German and the UK system Id suggest:

-Diplom Übersetzer FH = BAHons in Translation (the course length is 4 years and both are "sandwich courses" i.e. include an industrial placement and/or a semester abroad therefore they are more or less equivalent)

-Diplom Übersetzer=Master in Translation

The best solution however is to quote "Diplom Übersetzer" and to write a couple of sentences on the German university system and then you can always add "In the UK it can be compared to a BAHons / Master in translation."

I am a Diplom Übersetzer FH but if I were to apply for a job in the UK I couldnt write "BAHons in translation" in my CV because on the one hand Im not entitled to use the BA title and on the other hand in Germany a Bachelor is only a three year course and a Diplom is a 4+ year course.

Vampyre
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sylvie malich: Right, the point is that the Diplom Übersetzer got their degree in Germany with the German system. The system cannot be translated but explained. Just like a Dip. Ing. does not have a masters in engineering. I leave it as such, or graduate engineer.
2 hrs
  -> thank you, i agree, institutions seldom if ever have a 1:1 equivalent within another culture therefore a good explanation goes a longer way than a misleading translation

agree  Dr Andrew Read: with your solution re Gmn term + explanation
3 hrs

agree  roneill: with leaving the German term
4 hrs

agree  Christian: and with Andrew Read. Use the German term and give a short explanation.
22 hrs

agree  gangels: How many translators can dance on the tip of a pin?? The CVs of some 'Diplomübersetzer' on this thread read as though written by fourth-graders.
1 day2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Diplom-Übersetzer
Graduate Degree in Translation / Master's Degree in Translation


Explanation:
This is a bit complicated. My title, for example, is "staatlich geprüfte Übersetzerin" - which translates to "state-certified" / "state-examined" translator. So "certified" doesn't necessarily express the "Diplom" part. Generally, a German "Diplom" is equivalent to a master's degree (both in the UK and the US)

http://www.daad.or.th/StudyinGermany/RegularCourses.asp
http://www.internationaledu.net/english/germany2.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 16 mins (2004-07-31 12:00:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Uni-Diplom = Master\'s degree:
http://www.mm-translations.com/qualifications.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 17 mins (2004-07-31 12:00:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Uni-Diplom = Master\'s degree:
http://www.mm-translations.com/qualifications.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 49 mins (2004-07-31 12:32:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The point of the question, as I perceive it, is not in which country the person has received his or her degree, but if the term \"Diplom-Übersetzer\" *corresponds* to a master\'s degree\" -- and the answer to that is yes.


    Reference: http://www.rwth-aachen.de/zentral/english_degree_diplom.html
    Reference: http://www.proz.com/h.php3?bs=1&id=757951
AnnikaLight
Germany
Local time: 21:01
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 14
Grading comment
I am only giving you 2 points because the others gave very good information, too.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Vampyre: bei Unistudiengängen kenne ich mich nicht aus, aber FH Diplom Übersetzer müssen noch ein bis zwei Jahre studieren um den Master zu bekommen also kann "Diplom Übersetzer" und "Masters Degree in Translation" nicht äquivalent sein
1 hr
  -> Hmm, Vampyre. Good point :-). FH ist nicht dasselbe. Aber ein "Uni-Übersetzer-Diplom" entspricht dem Master's...

agree  Aniello Scognamiglio: Universitätsdiplom is equivalent to "master's". The question was "does Diplom-Übersetzer correspond to a 'master degree'? Yes, definitely! //add: This is a double-agree!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Aniello :-)

neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: certainly does not apply for Germany
1 hr

agree  Sabine Griebler
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Diplom-Übersetzer
Postgraduate degree-qualified translator/Diplom-Übersetzer


Explanation:
Another two suggestions in the light of the discussion above. For the first, if we agree that a "Diplom" is not *exactly* the same as a Masters, then this would cover it.

Alternatively, depending on the context it cd be quite legitimate to simply use the German term - for example if it were in a CV/resume going to translation agencies, who would (or should) be familiar with the German term.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 56 mins (2004-07-31 15:40:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think some of you have alluded to the second alternative in your answers above, especially Vampyre - he/she should get the points if you go for that option. :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 5 mins (2004-07-31 15:48:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think in N America, they call a \"postgraduate degree\" a \"graduate degree\", a term little used in the UK. So this solution has dangers!

Dr Andrew Read
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  roneill: I agree with leaving the German term.
1 hr

neutral  Vampyre: re:postgraduate/graduate degree" thx for explaining the difference between the UK and US, i wasnt aware of it, but I guess we think along the same lines :-)
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search